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Full text of "What to do with the cold mutton : a book of réchauffés. Together with many other approved receipts for the kitchen of a gentleman of moderate income"

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Schlesinger Library 
Radcliffe College 



Culinary Collection 

From the Collection of 

Sophie Coe 



STUDIO 
ROBERT 1959 
MOTHERWELL 



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WHAT TO DO 



WITH THE COLD MUTTON: 



A BOOK OF RECHAUFFES. 



TOaBTHEB WITH 



MANY OTHEE APPROVED EEOEIPTS FOB THE KITOHEISr OF 
A GENTLEMAN OF MODEBATE INCOME. 



NEW YORK: 

BUNCE AND HUNTINaTON, PUBLISHEES. 

1865. 






' i 



PREFACE. 



It may be thought unDecessary to add another to 
the already numerous lists of books upon Cookery ; 
books as various in their degrees of excellence as in 
price. But this little work does not profess to teach 
" the whole Art of Cookery :" it simply aims at sup- 
plying a want often felt by the young and inexperi- 
enced mistress of a household, where a moderate in- 
come, rather than position, renders economy advisable ; 
and who, accustomed to every luxury and comfort in 
her father's house, is yet ignorant of the art by which 
such culinary results are attained, and would gladly 
see her husband's more modest table as well ordered, 
though by more simple means. To such persons, the 
following hints of " What to do with the Cold Mut- 
ton" may be of use, as suggesting something more 
than the only rechauffe that ever enters the imagina- 
tion of a plain cook — the inevitable " hash." 

The receipts that follow the "Book of Rechauffes" 
have all been long tried and approved, and though 
some of them may be thought of a more costly char- 
acter than is compatible with a " moderate income," 
the expense depends very much upon locality ; that 



4 PEEFAOE. 

which may be procured for possibly one or two 
shilllDgs in the country, may cost three, or four in the 
city, whilst in other things the reverse may be the 
case, and what may be dear inland, may be cheap at 
the, sea-coast. When guests are to be entertained, 
choicer dishes are required than are needed for the 
daily table, and for such occasions suitable receipts 
are given. But throughout this little book there is 
nothing that a plain cook may not manage well, after 
one or two trials ; and if her mistress will only take 
the trouble of telling her of any error against good 
taste in matters of arrangement or dishing-up, the 
result cannot fail to be equally satisfactory to both. 

P. K. S. 



WHAT TO DO 



WITH THE COLD MUTTON. 



No. 1.— STOCK 

It may appear odd to commence a list of rechauffes 
with a receipt for making stock, but inasmuch as this 
important foundation of all soups and sauces shotdd 
and can be made, in economic^ and well-ordered 
kitchens, from the bones of the joints of meat, or 
poultry, or game, that form the daily food of the 
family, this stock, so made, may fairly be classed 
under the head of rechauffes. 

Of course, upon any extraordinary occasiou, when 
a large quantity of stock may be needed, it must 
then be made from fresh meats, — shiu of beef, 
knuckle of veal, &c., according to the kind^required. 
But for daily use in a iamily, the stock made from 
dressed bones will be found sufficient ; and if the 
following method be carried out, the result will be 
as good stock as can be desired, though it is difficult 




6 Ei:oHATjrF]&s. 

to persuade plain cooks of this fact ; they always 
insisting, in their ignorance,' that fresh meat is posi- 
tively necessary to produce good soups and sauces. 
However, the following receipt, if fairly tried, will 
prove to them their mistake. Take the bones of a 
piece of sirloin of beef, that weighed, before the meat 
was cut off, ten or twelve pounds ; break them up 
with a chopper into eight or ten pieces, and put 
them into a stock-pot, or a stewpan, or a large sauce- 
pan, with a gallon of water ; let them stew gently 
for five or six hours by the side of the fire, then 
strain the liquid through a sieve into a basin, and 
put it aside for some hours, or till the next day. 
You will find that the gallon of water has been re- 
duced to half the quantity in the boiling. Then, 
when quite cold, carefully skim off every particle of 
&t, and put the stock into a stewpan with two large 
onions, a largensized carrot cut into three pieces, a tur- 
nip cut in half, and a head of celery, if in season ; if 
not, use a teaspoonful of celery-seed tied in a piece of 
muslin ; a small bunch of sweet herbs, and a sprig 
or two of parsley ; let these simmer gently by the 
side of the fire for two hours, and if the quantity 
becomes much reduced, put in a little boiling water, 
so as to keep it up to two quarts ; add salt, a little 
pepper, and a good-sized knob of sugar while boiling ; 
strain it when done from the herbs and vegetables, 
and you will then find your stock nicely flavored for 



soups or sauces ; in cold weather this will remain 
good in a cool larder for several days if desired ; but 
in summer it should be heated in a stewpan each 
day that you wish to keep it, and then poured into 
a clean basin; if this is not attended to, it will 
turn sour very soon. Any kind of bones will make 
good stock; mutton, beef, veal, or poultry, or 
game, all or any of these may be stewed down to- 
gether. The bone of a large leg or shoulder of mut- 
ton will make about three pints of stock ; and in 
stewing down bones that have been cooked, you may 
add to them any trimmings from necks or loins of 
mutton or other meat, or the shank-bone of a leg of 
mutton, &c., if you should happen to have them, 
remembering to add also more water in proportion, 
if you put a large quantity of these trinmiings in 
your stock-pot. Nothing of this kind should be 
wasted or thrown aside as useless, for all these things 
can be turned to good account ; and the liquor also 
in which meat or poultry has been boiled, instead of 
being thrown away, will make the stock all the 
better if you use it, as far as it goes, instead of water. 
In the various receipts for rechauffes, when " good- 
flavored stock" is directed to be used, the stock, 
after the herbs and vegetables have been added, is 
meant ; when "stock" only is mentioned, the broth 
without the flavoring of herbs and vegetables is 
intended. 



i 



8 B]filiOHAUFFts. 

No. 2. — ^If yon desire to make this stock into dear 
soup, add to it, when heated, the whites of two eggs 
beaten up with a teacupM of cold water ; pour this 
into the stock, whisk it well over the fire, give it a 
boil up, and strain it through a jelly-bag, once or 
more times, till it is as clear as white wine. Then 
to color it, if too pale, take two or three lumps of 
sugar, melt them over the fire in an iron spoon, till 
the sugar becomes a dark brown, but be careful not 
to bum it black ; dissolve this burnt sagar in a little 
hot water, and add as much of it to your soup as will 
make it the desired color (it should be the tint of 
golden sherry) without causing the soup to be either 
bitter or sweet. If bitter, the sugar will have been 
burnt too much ; if sweet, it will not have been burnt 
enough. This kind of clear soup may be varied in 
many ways ; you may put in it a variety of vegeta- 
bles, such as carrots, turnips, celery, onions, French 
beans, asparagus, green peas, and finely shred 
lettuce, all or any of these that may be in season 
together; only being careful to cut the difierent 
kinds all of the same size in small shreds about an 
inch loDg, so that all may be equally cooked in the 
same time: or you may put in small leaves of 
chervil only. Again, the same kind of clear soup 
may be thickened with a little sago or tapioca, boiled 
in it till quite clear ; or you may boH a little maca- 
roni or vermicelli in water, drain it, and put it in the 



/ 



Boup before serving; if boiled in the soup, it de- 
stroys the clearness of it. Or, should any of the 
clear soup *in which you have put cut vegetables be 
left, strain it off from the vegetables, and the next 
day, if you have a sufficient quantity to send to table, 
you may vary it by making it a puree or thick soup 
of some kind of vegetable, such as carrot, turnip, 
parsnip, vegetable marrow, or potato ; or you may 
thicken it with a little sago, <&c. This sago or ver- 
micelli soup again may be varied the second day by 
adding to it when heated, but not boiling^ the yolks of 
two or three eggs, beaten up in half a pint of milk ; 
let it thicken over the fire, stirring constantly ; but 
the soup must not boil, or the eggs will curdle it. 
Or the clear soup may be changed into a curry soup 
by adding curry paste in the proportion pf two table- 
spoonfuls of paste to three pints of soup ; thicken it 
with a little flour, boil it well, that it does not taste 
raw, and serve with a dish of plain boiled rice to be 
eaten with it. A little practice will soon teach a 
young cook how she may vary a soup according to 
the season of the year, so that, should enough be left 
to send up a second time, it need not be of the same 
kind, unless particularly wished for. 



10 EfiOHAUFFis OF FISH. 



EfiCHAUFFflS OF FISH. 



No. 3.— FISH IN WHITE SAUCE. 

Remote from the bones any kind of white boiled 
fish that may be left from the previous day's dinner, 
and break into flakes or convenient sized pieces. To 
the bones, heads, tails, and fins, add a small onion, 
a sprig of parsley, a small blade of mace, and nearly 
a pint of water. Let all simmer in a stew-pan by the 
fire till the liquid is reduced to half the quantity, 
and then strain the stock through a sieve. To this 
fish stock add a quarter of a pint of cream, or half 
milk and half cream ; thicken with a little flour and 
butter, season to taste with salt, and warm the pieces 
of fish in this sauce, but do not let it boil, or it wiU 
curdle. Put a border of nicely mashed potatoes 
round your dish, and serve up the fish and sauce 
quite hot in the centre. You may use any kind.of 
light-colored meat stock for the sauce, instead of that 
made from the fish-bones, if you prefer it. 

No. 4.— TO DRESS FISH A SkCOND TIME. 

To a small quantity of fish, add two handfuls of 
bread crumbs, two eggs, two ounces of butter, a 
little essence of anchovy, and a little pepper, salt, 



E:6cHAUFFilS OF FISH. 11 

and cayenne. Mix these all well with the fish, 
which should previously be taken from the bones 
and pounded ; batter a plain mould, put in the mix- 
ture, and steam it until it is hot throilgh. Any cold 
boiled fish may be dressed in this way. 

No. 5.— FISH AND EGGS. 

Take any nice pieces of cod, turbot, or brill, heat 
them through in boiling water, and drain them welL 
Boil three eggs hard, and when cold cut them in 
three or four pieces lengthways; boil twice the 
quantity of potatoes to eggs, and cut in slices the 
same way. Have ready the following sauce : — ^mix a 
teaspoonful of ready-made mustard, a teaspoonful of 
vinegar, a teaspoonful of Harvey or Reading sauce, 
and some pepper and salt ; melt a quarter of a pound 
of butter, and add to these ingredients, mixing well. 
Pour this sauce over the fish, eggs, and potatoes 
quite hot, and serve. 

No. 6.— FISH CAKES. 

To about a pound of cold boiled fish, either salt or 
fresh, add one and a half pounds of mashed potatoes ; 
beat well together in a mortar, with the addition of an 
egg and a little milk, and season with salt, pepper, 
onions, and a little thyme well chopped ; of course 
omitting the salt if the fish should have been salted. 
Then, with a little flour, roll into small round cakes, 



12 K^OHAUFIlfes OF FISH. 

rather thick, and fry a light browiL Dish them up 
as you would cutlets. 

■ 

No. T.— FISH AND MAOAEONL 

Take the remains of any kind of white boUed fish, 
remove the bones and skin, and break it in rather 
small pieces. BoU some maccaroni in water till ten- 
der, drain it well, and cut it in lengths of about an 
inch, and mix equal quantities of fish and macaroni 
Then put two ounces of butter into a stewpan, add 
the yolks of two eggs, a little lemon-juice, pepper, 
and salt, and stir in well half a pint of good melted 
butter; make the sauce quite smooth, put in the 
fish and macaroni, and heat it thoroughly in the 
sauce. Pour it out on a dish, keeping it as high as 
you can in the centre ; cover it thinly with fine bread 
crumbs, and brown the top with a salamander, or in 
the oven till of a nice light color. 

No. 8.— FISH PUDDINa. 

Take equal quantities ,df any cold boiled white fish 
and mashed potatoes. ^ Break the fish up quite small, 
and mix well with the potatoes, adding two ounces 
of butter made liquid in the oven, or if you have it, 
you may use cream instead of the butter; season 
with salt and a little pepper. Butter a pudding 
dish, put in the mixture, keeping the top rough, and 



t 



E:feOHAUFFi:8 OF FISH. 13 

place it in the oven till hot through and the top is 
nicely browned. 

No. 9.— TURBOT OUTLETS. 

Take the remains of the fish from the bones very 
carefally ; if a thick lai'ge fish, cut it through slant- 
ways in slices, keeping them all of the same size and 
form. Sprinkle each piece with salt, pepper, and 
nutmeg ; dip it into oiled butter, then into fine bread 
crumbs, then into beaten yolk of egg^ and again into 
the bread crumbs; fry them in boiling fat, drain 
very dry, and serve them as you would cutlets, with 
a clear light-colored gravy, flavored strongly with 
lemon-juice, for sauce. 

No. 10.— TURBOT i LA CREME. 

Put into a stewpan a piece of butter the size of a 
large egg^ two table-spoonfuls of flour, a little milk, 
some salt, pepper, and nutmeg, and stir over the fire 
till quite smooth, adding more milk till the sauce is 
of the right thickness and well boiled ; then put in 
the fish, broken in somewhat small pieced ; let them 
heat through, and serve. 

No. 11.— TURBOT k LA SAINTE MENEHOULD. 

Cut the turbot in neat pieces, dip each into a very 
hot thick sauce, which must be light colored and 
very well flavored; pile them in a dish, sprinkle 



14 EijCHAXJFF:fe8 OF FISH. 

thickly with fine bread crumbs, over this grate some 
Parmesan cheese, and brown it nicely in the oven or 
before the fire, and serve very hot. 

No. 12.— CURRIED COD. 

Boiled cod makes an excellent r^chauffS as a 
curry. For about a pound of fish, free from skin 
and bones, take the following ingredients: two 
ounces of butter, one ounce of curry powder, six 
ounces of finely chopped onions, and two salt-spoon- 
fals of salt. Melt the butter in a stewpan, then add 
the curry powder, onions, and salt, and let them boil 
thoroughly, or the curry powder will taste raw : put 
in the pieces of cod broken into large flakes, and let 
them cook for five minutes over a rather sharp fire, 
keeping it constantly stirred to prevent burning. If 
the curry seems too dry when the fish is added, 
pour in a little milk, just sufficient to moisten it 
without making it liquid. Pile the curry high in 
a dish, and serve with a border of well-boiled rice 
romid it. 

No. 13.— COD 1 LA PROVEXgALB. 

Remove the skin and the bones from the cod, and 
break it into flakes. Take a thin dish, and cover the 
bottom of it with some shallot, chives, or green 
onions, parsley, and lemon-peel — all which are to 
be finely chopped — a little salt, pepper, nutmeg, two 



k6ohauff:6s of fish. 16 

table-spoonMs of good salad oil, and a small bit of 
bntter. Arrange the pieces of cod over this, and 
repeat the same seasoning over the fish; then cover 
with crumbs of bread, and put the dish in the oven 
to cook slowly till sufficiently done. If the top is 
not well colored, brown it nicely with a red-hot 
shovel or a salamander. To be served very hot, and 
eaten with lemon-juice. 

No. 14.— BONNE BOUOHE OP COD. 

Out the cod into nice slices, removing the skin and 
bones. Put into a stewpan a small piece of butter, 
a table-spoonful of flour, a little very finely chopped 
garlic, some salt, pepper, and nutmeg ; moisten with 
cream or mUk, and stir the sauce over the fire till 
well mixed. Put in the fillets of cod, and warm 
them in the sauce; take them out, and cover each 
fillet with fine bread crumbs and grated Parmesan 
cheese; egg them with beaten yolk of egg, and 
cover again with bread crumbs and Parmesan. 
Sprinkle weU with a little oiled butter, and brown 
them in a cutlet-pan. Serve very hot. 

No. 15.— CROQUETTES OF COD. 

Cut the cod in small pieces, put them into a stew- 
pan with a little piece of butter, salt, pepper, and a 
bay-leaf; add sufficient flour from your dredging- 
box, and moisten with cream or milk. Cook the 



16 KfeCHAFFFilS OF FISH. 

ood for a few minutes, then take each piece, dip it 
into beaten yolk of egg^ and throw them immedi- 
ately into boiling fat ; let them take a good yellow 
color, drain well, and sei-ve very hot, piled as high 
as possible in your dish, with a border of fried pars- 
ley. 



No. 16.— VOL-AU-VENT OP COD. 

Break the cod in small pieces, and free it from 
skin and bone. Put into a stewpan a small piece of 
butter and two table-spoonfuls of flour, mix them 
together, and moisten them with half a pint of good 
nrilk; boil fast to reduce the sauce, stirring con- 
stantly, that it may not burn or stick to the bottom 
of the stewpan, and as it becomes thick, add by de- 
grees another half-pint of milk ; boil well and strain. 
Warm the pieces of cod in this sauce, add a little 
salt, and serve in a vol-au-vent. 



No. l*?.— COD FRITTERS. 

Take the cod from the bones in as large flakes as 
possible. Make a batter of the proper consistency 
for frying, of flonr, a little salad oil, a small quantity 
of any kind of light white wine, and a little salt 
Dip the flakes of cod in this batter, fry them in boil- 
ing fat, drain well, and serve. 



s 

» 



KfeCHAUFFfe OF FISH. 17 

No. 18.— COD 1 LA GARONNE. 

Put into a stewpan your pieces of cod, with a 
small bit of batter, two table-spoonfuls of oil, some 
capers, anchovies, parsley, and green onions, all 
chopped very fine, and pepper and salt ; warm the 
fish in this, stirring well till the oil and batter ^are 
well mixed, then put it into a dish, sprinkle over 
with fine bread crumbs, salamander the top, and 
serve. 

No. 19.— BOULETTES OP COD. 

Break the cod in very small pieces, warm it in a 
thick, well-flavored white sauce ; make it into small 
balls, egg and bread-crumb them twice, and fry a 
light-brown color. 

No. 20.— COD A LA FRANgAISE. 

Divide the fish in flakes free from skin and bone. 
Put into a stewpan some slices of lemon, fillets of 
well-washed and scraped anchovies, parsley, green 
onions, and a very little garlic, all finely chopped, 
salt, pepper, with salad oil and butter in equal quan- 
tities ; heat this over a slow fire, stirring incessantly, 
and pour the half of this sauce on to the dish in 
which you serve the fish ; arrange the pieces of cod 
OB this, put a border of neatly cut pieces of fried 
bread, pour the rest of the sauce over the fish. 



18 mfeOHAUFFijS OF FISH. 

sprinkle with bread crambs, brown nicely, and serve 
very hot. 

No. 21.— SALMON CUTLETS. 

Take as much cold boiled salmon as yon require 
for your dish of cutlets, and break it with a fork 
into very small shreds ; moisten with a little melted 
butter, or, if you have any of the lobster sauce left 
from the previous day, use that instead of the melted 
butter ; season with salt and a little cayenne pepper, 
and bind together with an egg well beaten. Make 
up into the shape of mutton cutlets, egg and bread- 
crumb them twice, and fry a light brown, and serve 
very hot. To be eaten with lemon-juice. 

No. 22.— SALMON AND SALAD. 

In some parts of Scotland, the remains of boiled 
salmon, instead of being pickled, as is usually done 
in England, are sent to table cold, to be eaten with 
salad; and those who try it in this way will dis- 
cover it to be excellent in hot weather. Trim the 
fish neatly, ornament it with sprigs of parsley, and 
serve with it a bowl of salad, dressed as No. 201 or 
No. 384, as may be preferred. 

No. 23,— FISH SALAD. 

If you have any fish left from the previous day's 
dinner, you may make it into an excellent salad. 



E3&CHAUFF^8 OF FISH. 19 

Cut it into neat pieces, about an inch and a half or 
two inches sqnare, and put th^n into a deep dish or 
basin, with salt to taste, and a little very finely 
chopped onion; over this squeeze the juice of a 
lemon, cover over the basin with a plate, and set it 
aside for two hours. Then shred some fresh, well- 
dried lettuce, pile it up high in the centre of a dish, 
drain the fish from the lemon-juice, and arrange the 
pieces in a circle as you would cutlets round the pile 
of lettuce, and pour over the lettuce, keeping the 
fish white, some salad sauce, No. 384. Place a small 
leaf of either parsley or chervil between ea<^ piece 
of fish by way of ornament, or a small piece of very 
red beet-root. If you prefer it, you may cut the fish 
into much smaller pieces, and put alternate layers of 
fish- and salad in your dish, taking care to fill it up 
as high as you can, and pour the sauce over the 
whole. 



No. 24.— SOUSED MACKEREL. 

Cold boiled mackerel are very good pickled nearly 
in the same way as salmon. Take as much as you 
require of the liquor in which the fish was boiled, if 
you have saved any ; if not, use water, and add to 
either an equal quantity of vinegar, a small onion, 
a bay-leaf, some sprigs of parsley, and some whole 
peppercorns. Boil all these together, then take out 
the onion, bay-leaf, and parsley, pour the pickle over 



30 BilOHATJFF^ OF FISH. 

the fieb, uid let it remain in it till next day, then 
serve it in the pickle, garnished with apriga of fennel. 

No. 25.— KEDGEREE. 
Boil a teaoopful of rice, aa if for curry ; ta&e cold 
dressed whiting, or any delicate fish, and pick all the 
meat from the bones; mix two ounces of butter with 
the rice first, then the fish, seasoning with pepper, 
salt, and a httle cayenne, and lastly, add two raw 
eggs beaten slightly ; stir all together over the fire 
quickly for a minute or two, and serve very hot. 
This is an excellent dJsh for breakiast. 



hi-3-: 



B:i!OHAUFF:£:s of mutton. 31 



EfiCHAUFFfiS OF MUTTON. 



Ko. 26.— BJ6CHAMEL OF MUTTON. 

IjF a loin of mutton has been carved in slices with- 
out cntting through the bones, an excellent dish may 
be made from the remains of it. Cut away what is 
left of the meat close to the bones of the back (the 
butcher should be told not to chop through these 
bones), leaving from two to three inches of the fat 
meat at the end of the ribs, so as to form a sort of f 

well for the following preparation. Take this meat 
that you have cut off, mince it very small, and put it 
into a stewpan with a finely-chopped onion, salt, 
pepper, nutmeg, and moisten with a little good fla- 
vored stock, dredging in enough flour to thicken it. 
When sufficiently cooked, pour this mince upon the 
bones of the joint, cover thickly with fine bread- r, 
crumbs, making it the original shape of the loin, 
sprinkle well with a little oiled butter, and put it 
into the oven to brown nicely, and serve very hot. 
If you have not enough of the meat of the loin to 
make the bechamel, you may add to what there is, 
any cold mutton from another joint that you may 
happen to have. 



33 iu6chauff:6s of mutton. 

no. 2t.— broiled shoulder of mutton. 

Take the remains of a shoulder of mutton, pare off 
all the skin and fat from what meat there is, and 
score it deeply and closely all over on each side. 
Then melt to oil, from two to three ounces of butter, 
and stir into this two large teaspoonfuls of ready- 
made mustard, one of salt, and a saltnspoon of cayenne 
pepper; mix well, and with a teaspoon pour this 
mixture into all the scores of the meat ; put it on the 
gridiron, and broil it over a clear, sharp fire ; send to 
table immediately upon a pur6e of onions or turnips. 

No. 28.— BROILED MUTTON WITH TOMATO SAUCE. 

Cold boiled leg of mutton, if not too much boiled, 
is very good cut in rather thick slices, sprinkled 
with pepper and salt, and broiled. To be served 
very hot, with a thick sauce flavored strongly with 
fresh tomatoes or tomato sauce. 

-, No. 29.— CUTLETS A LA SAINTE MENEHOULD. 

> If you have the best end of a boiled neck of mutton 

left, trim it and cut it up into cutlets, warm them in 
high-flavored thick sauce, then dip them into fine 
bread crumbs, then into beaten yolk of egg to which 
you have added chopped parsley and onion and salt, 
k then again into bread crumbs, and fry theuL Send 

them up with a rich brown sauce. 

r 



KfeCHAITFF:i:S OF MUTTON. 23 

No. 30.— GEOSVENOR CUTLETa 

These also are made l&om the remains of a boiled 
neck of mntton. Cut into cutlets neatly, and warm 
them in a brown glaze ; serve them Ih a crown, and 
fill in the centre with a thick white sauce, or a puree 
of turnips or potatoes ; but be careful in dishing them 
up not to let the white sauce or puree fall over the 
brown-glazed cutlets. 

No. 31.— CUTLETS OP MUTTON k LA PABMESANE. ^ 

Cut rather thick slices from a cold leg or saddle of 
mutton, keeping them all of the same size and form. 
Mix equal quantities of grated Parmesan cheese and 
fine bread crumbs ; dip the slices of mutton into a 
little good-tasted thick brown sauce, then into the 
bread and Parmesan, then into beaten yolks of eggs 
in which you have put a little salt and very finely 
chopped parsley and chives or onion, and a second 
time into the bread and Parmesan, and either grill 
them over a clear slow fire, or fry them and seiTe 
them in a crown, with a sauce flavored with tomato 
in the centre. If you grill them, the cutlets should 
first be sprinkled with a little oiled butter. 

No. 32.-PRUSSIAN CUTLETS. 

Cut as much cold mutton from any joint as you 
require, pound it, and moisten it with a little good- 



/V 



24 KfeCHAUFFfe OF MUTTON. 

flavored stock that is strong enough to have become 
a jelly ; add to it a shallot very finely minced, pep- 
per, salt, two tea-spoonfals of soy, and the yolk of 
an egg; mix all thoroughly together, form into 
rather thick cdtlets, and fry them in hot fat. 

JC^ No. 33.— GRILIiED CUTLETa 

Cat the slices of mntton rather thick, and make 
them of the same form and size ; warm them in a 
good-flavored thick sauce, then dip them into fine 
bread crumbs, then into yolk of egg in which you 
have beaten a little very finely chopped parsley and 
onion, then again into the bread crumbs ; grill them 
over a slow clear fire, and send them up with a little 
clear brown gravy. 

No. 34.— BLANQUETTE OP MUTTON. 

Cut the meat from a cold boiled leg of mutton in 
very thin small slices, paring away the skin and the 
sinews. If you happen to have any mushrooms, cut 
up three or four middle-sized, and stew them in a 
little butter (if not, put in one or two table-spoonfuls 
of mushroom catchup to the sauce to give the 
flavor), add to them a little white sauce, the slices 
of meat, and as much stock as may be necessary to 
make the sauce the right thickness ; warm the meat 
in this, adding salt to taste, and, just before serving, 
stir in the yolks of two eggs well beaten, and let 



B^OHATTFPES OE MyTTON. 26 

them tbicken the sauce, hat be careful it does not 
boil, or it will curdle. 

No. 35.— HASHED MUTTON WITH MUSHROOMa 

Cut the mutton into niceslices, fpee from skin and 
fat, and dredge each slice on both sides with flour. 
Take six good-sized mushrooms, trim them, cut each 
in four pieces, and put. them into a stew-pan with a 
small piece of batter to stew ; add a little good stock, 
some pepper and salt, and when sufficiently done, put 
in the meat ; let it heat through slowly, stirring fre- 
quently to prevent burning, but be careful that it 
does not boil^ or the meat will be bard ; and as soon 
as the flour loses its raw taste%ind thickens the hash, 
it is done, and should be served immediately with 
sippers of neatly cut thin toast or fried bread round 
the dish. 

Ko. 36.— THE BPICURFS HASH. 

To about one pound of cold mutton, cut in neat 
slices, take the following ingredients ; — slice two large 
onions, put them into a stewpan with a small piece 
of butter, and fry them till they are a good brown 
color ; then add half a pint of good-flavored broth 
or stock, a dessert-spoonful of Tums or Harvey 
sauce, three dessert-spooniuls of tarragon vinegar, a 
table-spoonful of curry paste, a small lump of sugar, 
and a little pepper and salt to taste ; let this sauce 



26 KilCHAjrFFBS OF MTKTTON. 

boil up, and then simmer slowly by the fire for half 
an hour, stirring it occasionally, and thicken it with 
one table-spoonful of flour, mixed smooth in a little 
cold water, or half the quantity of corn-starch. Let 
the thickening boil thoroughly, and when the sauce 
is ready, put in the slices of meat, let them heat 
through, but not boil, or the meat will be hard, and 
serve quite hot, with sippers of toast round the dish. 

No. 37.—CURRIED MUTTON. 

• 

Though a curry is best made from fresh meat, yet 
a very good one may be the result of using cold 
mutton for it, if the following instruotions are at- 
tended to. For one fiound of cold mutton, cut in 
small pieces about half an inch square, take the fol- 
lowing ingredients : — one ounce of curry powder, 
two ounces of butter, six ounces of onions finely 
minced, and two salt-spoonfuls of salt. Melt the bat- 
ter in a stewpan, and when boiling hot, add two large 
onions cut in slices until well browned, when take 
them out and lay aside ; then put in the curry pow- 
der, minced onions, and salt ; mix aU well together, 
and keep stirring till the curry powder is thoroughly 
cooked, then add the meat, and continue stirring con- 
stantly, gradually adding sufficient boiling water to 
keep all soft, without being in the least degree liquid, 
and also the browned onioas chopped fine. From 
five to ten minutes over a good fire will be time 



EiiCHAUFFES OF MUTTOIf. 27 

enough for the mutton to stew, as it has been pre- 
viously cooked ; pile it high in the gentre of a dish, 
and serve it with a border of plain boiled rice 
round it. 

No. 38.--MUTTON PUDDINa. 

A very good pudding may be made from cold 
mutton ; boiled is better for the purpose than roast, 
but either may be used. Cut the mutton in small 
slices, rather thick ; mix well together in a plate 
some flour, salt, and pepper, with a good sized onion 
finely chopped, and into this mixture dip each piece 
of mutton ; slioe three or four potatoes, according to 
size. Then biitter a pudding iik>uld or basin, line it 
with a light suet crust, lay in lightly the mutton 
and potatoes in alternate layers, till you have filled 
up your mould, pour in a tea-cupful or more of good 
stock, cover the top closely with the rest of the suet 
crust, and boil or steam it till done. It will not take 
so long to cook as if niade from fresh meat. 

No. 39.— TIMBALES OF MUTTON. 

Mince very small as much mutton as you require 
to fill your moulds ; soak a little crumb of bread in 
some good stock ; chop as fine as possible a small 
clove of garlic and a little parsley ; mix all these 
thoroughly, adding salt, pepper, and nutmeg, with 
sufficient beaten yolk of egg to bind all together. 



28 R^HAXJFF]&S OF MUTTON. 

Boil a small quantity of the small-pipe macaroni in 
water till tender, and drain it well. Butter the 
inside of as many plain tin cups or moulds as you 
wish for your dish, line them neatly with the mac- 
aroni, placing it round layer after layer, or cutting 
it in lengths of the size of the top of the mould and 
the height of the sides, so that the macaroni stands 
upright round the moulds ; fill in the centre with the 
mixture you have prepared, cover over with mac- 
aroni, or only flour the meat, as you please ; tie a 
doth over the topj and boil them for half an hour. 
Turn the timbales out of the moulds, and serve with 
a thick brown sauce which you have flavored with 
mushroom catchup, 4^ut be careful not to pour it 
over the macaroni, which should look as white as 
possible. 

No. 40.— MINOED MUTTON WITH POACHED EGGS. 

Mince the mutton small, taking out all skin and 
sinew. Put into a stewpan a small piece of butter 
with one or two onions, some parsley, and a sprig of 
tarragon, all chopped fine, and let them fry well in 
the butter ; then add suflScient stock. for the quantity 
of meat ; pepper and salt to taste, a little browning 
if needed for the color, and a table-spoonful or more 
of flour- mixed in a little stock or water. Stir con- 
stantly, and when the stock is smooth and well . 
boiled, add the minced mutton and warm it through, 



b3§johauff:6s of mutton. 29 

but .do not let it boil, or it will be hard. Pour it 
upon a dish, and Berve it with some nicely poached 
eggs on the top. 

No. 41.— MINCED MUTTON AND CUCUMBER. 

Mince rather small as much cold roast or boiled 
mutton as you require, freeing it fi*om skin and 
sinew. Pare a large-sized cucumber, take out the 
seeds, and cut it up into pieces about half an inch 
square ; stew them in a little savory brown sauce, 
and, when tender, add the minced mutton and a 
little thickening if needed ; let the mutton heat 
through, stirring well to mix thoroughly with the 
cucumber, and serve it piled bi^ on a dish with 
neatly-cut pieces of fried bread round it. 

No. 42.-^VEGETABLE-MARROW STUFFED WITH 

MUTTON. 

Cut a good sized vegetable-marrow in half, down 
the length, scoop out the seeds, and fill with the fol- 
lowing mixture : — mince very iSne a little cold mut- 
ton, dredge a little flour over it, season with pepper, 
salt, a little finely chopped onion, and bind together 
with 'yolk of egg. Fill the centre of the vegetable- 
marrow with this, tie the two halves together with 
some fine packthread, and stew it till tender in good- 
flavored stock. When done, take it out of the stock, 
which you must thicken with the yolks of two or 



30 Ki:CHAUFFi;s cf mutton". 

three eggs ; pour this sance over the vegetable- 
marrow (from which you have previously removed 
the string), and serve. If you prefer it, you may 
use several small marrows, instead of one large one. 

No. 43.— STEWED MUTTON 1 LA JAEDINlfeRB. 

Cut the meat from the joint in rather large, thick 
pieces. Slice two or three small beet-roots and one 
cucumber, and put them into a stewpan with a let- 
tuce, an onion, pepper, salt, a small quantity of butter, 
and a little stock or water. Set the stewpan in the 
oven or on a stove, and when the vegetables have 
stewed tiU they are tender, add to them a quantity 
of boiled peas and the meat. Let the whole stew 
till the meat is well warmed through, and then serve 
it with the meat piled high in the centre of the dish 
and the vegetables arranged round it. 

No. 44.— EISSOLES OF MUTTON. 

Take half a pound of cold mutton, chop it very 
fine, and mix it well with rather more than a table- 
spoonful of flour ; chop an onion small and boil it in 
a tea-cupful of good-flavored broth or stock, and add 
to this the meat and flour, flavoring with pepper, 
salt, and nutmeg, and boil for five minutes. Pour 
upon a plate, and set aside to get quite cold, and 
then divide it into small portions, making each into 
a small ball of sausage shape ; egg and bread-crumb 



ElfeCHAUFFES OF MUTTON. 31 

them twice over, and fry in hot fat ; drain well, and 
serve very hot, piled high on a folded napkin, and 
garnish with sprigs of fried parsley. If the mince 
should be too stiff, add a little more broth or boiling 
water while boiling. 

No. 45.— CROQUETTES OF MUTTON. 

Make about half the quantity of the preparation 
for rissoles. Roll out some puff paste rather thin, 
cut out with a round cutter about the size of the top 
of a tea-cup as many circles of paste as you wish ris- 
soles, put on each a large tea-spoonful of the mince, 
double half the circle over it, wet the edges, and 
press them together, and either fry the croquettes in 
hot fat or bake them in the oven ; if baked, wash 
them over previously with beaten yolk of egg. Dish 
them high on a folded napkin, and send to table 
very hot. 



83 Bi!0HAUFF]&3 OF BEEF. 



EfiCHAUFFfiS OP BEEF. 



No. 46.— MOULD OF. BEEP. 

Take as much cold roast or braised beef as you 
require for the size of your mould, mince it quite 
small, and then pound it a little. Soak a small quan- 
tity of cramb of bread in broth or stock, mix it well 
with the pounded beef, add a small clove of garlic 
chopped as fine as possible; pepper, salt, a table- 
spoonful of mushroom catchup, and sufficient yolk 
of egg well beaten to bind all well together. Butter 
a plain tin mould, dredge it over slightly with flour, 
flU it with the mince, flour over the top, tie a cloth 
closely over, and boil or steam it for an hour. When 
doDC, turn it out of the mould, and serve it with a 
good-flavored, thick brown sauce round it. 

No. 4T.— CROQUETTES IN POTATO PASTE. 

Make a mince of beef as directed for croquettes of 
mutton (No. 45), but instead of using puff paste, 
make the following preparation for them. Boil one 
pound of potatoes, and mash them in a basin ; when 
cold, add one egg, two ounces of flour, and a little 
salt ; mix into a paste, roll it out, and use it as you 



_ E^OHAUFFiiS OF BEEF. 33 

would pnfT paste in the receipt for matton croqaettes. 
Fry the croquettes a light color, turning them fre- 
quently to prevent burning, and serve, piled high on 
a napkin decorated with fried parsley. The potato 
paste should be made in a cool place, and should not 
stand long before it is used. 

No. 48.— HASHED BBEP. 

Cut as much cold roast beef as you require for 
your dish, in neat slices, free from skin and gristle. 
Put into a stewpan a small piece of butter, a large 
onion minced, a table-spoonful of flour, and keep stir- 
ring over the fire till it browns, but be carefrd it 
does not bum. Then stir in by degrees half a pint 
of good-flavored stock, add salt to taste, and let the 
sauce boil till it thickens sufficiently, when put m 
two table-spoonfuls of hot green pickle chopped 
small, and the slices of beef; let them heat through, 
and serve with sippets of toast round the dish. 

No. 49.— MINCBD BEEP AU QBATIN. 

Mince small as much cold roast beef as you wish 
for your dish. Put into a stewpan a small quantity 
of good brown sauce, together with a shallot chopped 
small; salt, pepper, and nutmeg; give it a good boil, 
and warm the meat in this, making it rather thick. 
Pour it into a deep dish, cover it over thickly wifh 
fine bread crumbs, sprinkle ovepr scone oiled batter, 



34 EficHAUFFilS OF BEEF. 

and put it into the oven to brown nicely, and serve 
immediately. 



No. 50.— FRIED BEEF AND ONION. 

Cut some cold salt beef in nice slices, rather more 
than the eighth of an inch in thickness ; peel and slice 
about the same thickness a large Spanish onion. Fat 
from three to four ounces of butter in a clean fiying- 
pan, and when melted put in the slices of onion, and 
fiy them till soft and they are a nice yellow color ; 
then drain them from the butter, into which put the 
slices of beef to fry; they must not be allowed to 
get hard, but as soon as cooked, serve immediately, 
as hot as possible, with the fried onions piled high 
in the middle of your dish and the slices of beef 
arranged around it. 

No. 61.— SCALLOPED BEEF. 

Melt an equal quantity of cheese and fresh butter, 
say two ounces of each, mince fine half a pound of 
cold roast beef, and warm it in the cheese and butter, 
adding a little pepper and salt; pour this mixture 
into tin or plated scallop shells, sprinkle. them over 
with crumbs of bread, then with grated cheese, and 
put them into the oven, or in a Dutch oven before 
the fire, to brown nicely, and serve very hot. 



B£OHAUFF:iiS OF BEEF. S5 

No. 52.— STEWED BEEF k LA POULBTTB. 

Cut some nice slices of cold stewed or braised 
beef qaite free from fat or skin. Chop small some 
parsley, chives, or green onions, a sprig of tarragon, 
and let these herbs stew for a few minutes in a small 
quantity of butter; then dredge in a little flour, add 
half a pint of stock, some salt, pepper, and nutmeg, 
and let the sauce boil well. Then put in the meat ; 
let it warm through, and the last thing thicken your 
sauce with the yolks of two or three eggs, and serve 
immediately. 

No. 53.— STEWED BEEP EN MATELOTE. 

Cut some nice slices of stewed beef from the lean 
part, and free from skin. Take about a dozen button 
onions, and put them whole into a stewpan with a 
small piece of butter ; let them become yellow, then 
dredge in some flour, and moisten with nearly half a 
pint of stock, adding some small mushrooms if you 
have them, pepper, salt, a few springs of parsley, 
winter savory, and a bay-leaf tied together, and a 
glass of red wine; let the sauce boil till the onions 
and the mushrooms are done, then put in the slices of 
beef to warm through, take out the bunch of herbs, 
and serve with sippets of fried bread round the dish. 
This receipt answers equally well for cold roast beef. 



86 sisOHATTFFisS OF BEEF. 

No. 64— POLPETTL 

Take two table-f^poonfiils of very finely chopped 
cold roast beef, a dessert-spoonful of the under fat 
of the sirloin, also very finely, chopped, one table- 
spoonful of bread crumbs soaked ih broth or water, 
one tablcHspoonful of grated Parmesan cheese, the yolks 
and whites of two eggs beaten separately, the juice and 
peel of half a lemon, and pepper and salt to taste. 
Mix aU well together, make up into calls, roU in fine 
bread crumbs, and fry them; dram well, and serve 
on a folded napkin. 

No. 55.-«POTTED BEEF. 

Take some cold boiled beef (the lean half of the 
round is the best), remove aU the skinny parts, 
mince fine, and then pound in a mortar with some 
fresh butter till quite smooth. Season with a little 
nutmeg, a little black pepper^ some cayenne^ a little 
mace, and salt if necessary. Press it very firmly 
into flat pots; clarify some fresh batter, and poor 
over the top of each pot, and when cold, paper it 
over, and keep in a cold place. 

Na 66,--OALLIMAUFET. 

Take as much cold salt beef as yon require for 
your dish, and mince it smalL Boil some cabbages 
tiU nearly done, take them out of the saucepan, 



KisCHAtTPF^S OF BEEF. S7 

drain the water thoroughly &om them, and chop 
them small. Take equal quantities in bulk of the 
minced beef and cabbage, mix them well together, 
and fry with a little butter, or good clarified dripping, 
in a frying-pan, till done of a nice light color; 
pile the gallimaufiy high in a dish, and serve very 
hot. 



88 K60HAUFF]fes OF VEAL, 



EfiOHAUFFES OF VEAL. 



No. 5T.— VEAL 1 L'lTALIBNNB. 

Boil some macaroni in water till it is tender ; let 
it drain, and lay it evenly in rows round a basin or 
plain tin mould ; then fill it with the following in- 
gredients : — cold veal minced very fine, and sufficient 
ham or tongue, also very finely chopped, to make 
the whole savory, a little grated bread soaked in 
broth or water, a small quantity of grated lemon- 
peel, a little bit of pounded mace, and pepper and 
salt ; mix all these well together, and bind it with 
the yolks of two eggs and a little good rich gravy 
or cold savory jelly. Put this mixture into the 
macaroni, cover the top with a layer of macaroni, 
allowing room for the meat to swell, tie a cloth, 
floured, over it, and boil it for three-quarters of an 
hour. Turn it out of the mould, and pour round it 
in the dish some good light-colored gravy, flavored 
with mushroom catchup. If you do not happen to 
have either ham or tongue, you may use some finely 
chopped anchovies. 



R^OHAUFFis OF VEAL. 39 

NO. 58.— VEIL AND RIOB PIE. 

Boil a small quantity of rice in water till nearly 
tender, and drain it thoroughly ; then stir in half a 
pint of good white sauce, two large table-spoonfuls 
of grated cheese, and some cold roast or boiled veal 
cut in little slices as thin as possible, adding sufficient 
salt and cayenne pepper to flavor the whole, and mix 
all well together. Butter well a plain tin mould, and 
shake in it some very fine bread crumbs, then line it 
with a very thin paste, fill it with the mixture of veal 
and rice, cover over the top with the same thin paste, 
and bake it in a moderate oven for an hour. Turn 
the pie out of the mould, taking care not to break it, 
and serve very hot. 

No. 59.— LARDED CUTLETS OF VEAL. 

Cut some slices from a cold fillet of veal, a third 
of an inch thick, and divide them into round pieces 
about the size of a Spanish silver dollar, or rather 
larger; lard these through with strips of fat bacon, 
using a large larding-pin for the purpose. Put into a 
stewpan nearly a pint of good stock, reduce it to 
half the quantity, add a little salt, a small lump of 
sugar, and as much coloring as may be needed if 
the sauce is not dark enough ; it should be reduced 
till it becomes a thinnish transparent glaze; put in 
the larded rounds of veal, let them stew in this till 



40 BfiOHAUFFfe OF VEAL. 

the bacon is quite cooked and the slices of veal 
nicely glased; then take them out of the sauce, 
moisten it, if too thick, with a little stock, add a 
small glass of red wine, the juice of a lemon, and a 
little cayenne pepper ; give it a boil, dish the rounds 
of Teal as you would mutton cutlets, pour the sauce 
in the centre, and serve. 

No. 60.— OLAZED CUTLETS WITH SORREL. 

Cut the slices of cold veal as for the preceding re- 
ceipt, stew these a little in some good glaze, take 
them out of it, and dish them as you would mutton 
cutlets, witb a pur^e of sorrel in the centre. 

No. 61.— VEAL FRITTERS WITH TOMATO SAUCE. 

The renudDS of a cold boiled knuckle of veal may 
be used in the following manner: — cut the meat 
in small pieces, dip each in batter, and fry them a 
Hght-brown color; drain them well from the fat, 
pile them high in a dish, and pour round them a 
thick brown sauce, which must be strongly flavored 
with fresh tomatos when in season ; at other times 
of the year, use tomato sauce instead of the ripe 
fruit 

No. 62.— BLANQUETTE OF VEAL. 

Gut some cold roast veal in small pieces. Put into 
a stewpan half a pint of white sauce with three or 



B^OHAXJFFilS OP VEAL. 41 

four mushrooms cut up small, or a little mushroom 
catchup ; let it boH, and then add the meat to heat 
through; put in the yolks of tVo eggs slightly 
beaten, stir constantly, and when they thicken the 
sauce, take the stewpan off the fire, squeeze in the 
juice of a lemon, and serve. 

Na 63.--CALFS HEAD k LA POULETTB. 

Cut the remains of a cold calTis head in smallish 
pieces. Put into a stewpan some sprigs of parsley, 
tarragon, and chives, or green onions, all chopped 
small, with a little butter ; let them fry in the butter, 
and then dredge in a little flour ; add some salt and 
pepper, and a few mushrooms chopped, if you have 
them, and moisten with sufficient stock for your 
sauce; let it boil for ten minutes, then put in the 
pieces of calf s head to heat through, which being 
done, stir in the yolks of two or three eggs ; continue 
stirring till the sauce thickens, when you must take it 
off the fire at once, add the juice of a lemon, and serve. 

No. 64.— OALFS HEAD FRITTEBS. 

Cut the cold calfs head into small round slices, put 
them in a deep dish, sprinkle on them some chopped 
parsley, tarragon, and chives, and squeeze over all 
the juice of a lemon, or two tablenspoonfuls of vine- 
gar. Let them remain in this pickle for t\lb or 
three hours, turning the pieces of calf's head every 



42 KfeOHAITFFilS OF VEAL. 

now and then, so that both sides may imbibe the 
flavoring ; then take them out, drain well from the 
acid, dip each piece into batter, and fry them in hot 
fat, a light yellow color ; serve very hot. 

No. 65.— HASHED CALFS HEAD. 

What is left of a boiled calf's head (with the skin 
on) will make an excellent dish, hashed, if the 
following directions are carefully attended to :— ^take 
the meat, palate, and gelatinous parts from the bones, 
cutting it in neat slices or pieces; stew down the 
bones, with a bunch of sweet herbs, in the liquor 
in which you boiled the head (which should be 
saved. for this purpose), goid take as much of this 
stock, reducing it till strong enough, as may be re- 
quired for the quantity of meat you hash; to this 
stock add a little mushroom catchup, the juice of a 
lemon, one or two anchovies chopped fine, some 
cayenne pepper, and' a little coloring if necessary; 
boil all these together, then strain, and thicken with 
a little flour and butter. Then take what remabs 
of the brains, beat them up with two eggs and two 
table-spoonfuls of flour, a Uttle sage, thyme, and 
parsley, all chopped veiy fine, and season with cay- 
enne and salt ; make it up into little flat cakes, and 
fry in butter or good dripping, and drain weU on a 
sieve before the fire. Make, also, some forcemeat 
balls of fine bread crumbs, a little bit of boHed 



irfjOHAUFF^S OF VEAL. 43 

meat and &t bacon, both minced very snaal], a little 
parsley, lemon-peel, and an anchovy, all chopped 
fine; bind together with yolk of eggy and make 
into small balls, to be boiled in the gravy, during 
which time add the pieces of meat to stew a little, 
and a small glass of port wine. Dish your hash 
nicely, and garnish round the edge with the brain- 
cakes, little pieces of bacon rolled and fried, egg 
balls (made as in No. 126), and button mushrooms. 

No. 66.— MOULD OF CALF'S HEAD. 

Cut the best parts of what is left of a boiled calf's 
head into nice pieces, and stew down the bones and 
the trimmings in the liquor the head was boiled in, 
till the stock is .sufficiently strong to set in a firm 
jelly when cold.- While boiling, add the juice of a 
lemon, or even two, if small, and a little salt ; clear 
with white of egg, and run through a jelly-bag till 
quite clear and bright, when you may stir in a table- 
spoonful of sherry. Oil a plain mould, ornament it 
with cold boiled white of egg^ cut into small stars 
or shapes with a tin cutter, a few smaU leaves of 
parsley here and there, and some little pieces of very 
red cold boiled tongue, if you happen to have it ; 
then lay in the pieces of calf's head neatly up to the 
top of the mould, taking care not to pack it too 
tight, so that the jelly may run in between the 
pieces of meat. You must pour the jelly carefully 



44 K^OHAtTFFfe OF VEAL. 

into the mould, and it should be cold, though not 
set, when you do so. Turn it out, when wanted, on 
to a dish, garnish round with parsley, and senre at 
luncheon or supper. 

No. 67.— CALVES' FEET FRITTEES. 

In making calf's fooi jelly, unless you want a 
large quantity of stock, you may make a very good 
savory dish from the calves* feet that have been 
used for the jelly. Do not let them stew till they 
fall to pieces and all goodness is boiled out of them, 
but, while they are still firm, take them out of the 
stock, split them open, take out the bones (which 
you return to the stock for your sweet jelly), and 
lay the coverings of them flat in a dish to get colfl. 
Then cut them into small pieces, either oblong or 
cutlet shaped, dip each in batter, and fry a light 
color ; drain well from the fat, pile high on a dish, 
pour the following sauce round, and send to table 
very hot : — take half a pint of stock, add to it two 
table-spoonfuls of tarragon vinegar, one of Mogul 
sauce, a little salt, a lump of sugar, and sufficient 
browning to make it a good color; thicken slightly 
with com flour, or arrow-root, and boil the sauce 
well before using. 



B:6CHAnFF]^ OF POBK. 46 



RfiCHAUFFfiS OF PORK. 



No. 68.— MINOED POBK, 

Out the meat of cold roast pork into little dice, or 
you may mince it fine if you prefer it. Put into a 
stewpan a small wine-glassful of vinegar, a shaUot 
chopped fine, half a bay-leaf, a clove of garlic, salt, 
pepper, and three-quarters of a pint of stock ; boil it 
till reduced considerably, then skim it and strain it 
through a sieve; put it back into the stewpan, 
thicken it slightly, add the minced pork ; let it heat 
through, and serve very hot, garnished with toasted 
bread. 

No. 69.— MINCED PORK WITH ONIONS. 

Mince some cold roast pork, but not too fine. 
Then slice very thin two large onions; put them 
into a stewpan with a little bit of butter to brown 
slightly, add three-quarters of a pint of stock, and 
let the onions stew well in it ; when done, put in 
three table-spoonfuls of brown sauce, if you have it; 
if not, a little glaze or browning, salt, pepper, and 
thicken with a small quantity of flour and butter ; 
boil well, and then add the minced pork ; warm it in 
the sauce, and serva 



46 BilOHAUFPilS OF PORK. 

No. TO.— BEOILBD PORK WITH MOaUL SAUCE. 

Cut some nice slioes nearly half an inch thick, and 
about the size of a small matton cutlet, from a le^ of 
cold boiled pork. Dip a paste brash in a little oiled 
butter, brush lightly over the pork on each side, and 
broil the slices (not too dark) over a clear fire. 
Take half a pint of good stock, add to it three 
dessert-spoonfuls of Mogul sauce (No. ^65), thicken 
it a little with flour and butter, and let it boil well ; 
dish the slices of pork in a circle, as you would 
cutlets, pour the sauce in the centre, and serve very 
hot. The pork should not have been very long in 
salt, or it will be hard when broiled. 

No. n.—BROILED PORK k LA MILANAISB. 

BroU the slices of cold boiled leg of pork as in the 
previous receipt. Take one pint of good stock, add 
to it three table-spoonfuls of tomato sauce (No. 367), 
a little thickening of arrow-root, and boil it well. 
Boil also some macaroni in water till quite tender, 
drain it thoroughly, put a layer on the dish in which 
you mean to serve the pork, and over the macaroni 
grate some Parmesan cheese ; on this sprinkle a little 
oiled butter* and a little of the sauce you have made, 
then put another layer of macaroni and Parmesan 
cheese, sprinkle again with the oiled butter, dish 
the broiled pork in a circle on the top; over all poor 



b:6chauff]&8 of pork. 47 

the rest of the sauce, and send to table as hot as 
possible. 

No. T2.— RISSOLES OP PORKL 

Cold roast pork makes excellent rissoles. Proceed 
as for rissoles of mutton (No. 44), only leaving out 
the nutmeg, and adding instead a tiny bit of sage 
and a shallot chopped very fine. Make up the mince 
in the form of small sausages ; egg and bread-crumb 
them, and fry a light-brown color. 

No. '73.— CURRIED PORK. 

Cut about one pound of cold roast pork into small 
pieces, three-quarters of an inch square. Take two 
ounces of butter, one ounce of curry powder, six 
ounces of onions finely minced, and two salts-poon- 
Ms of salt. Melt the butter in a stewpan, and when 
boiling hot, add two large onions, cut in slices, until 
well browned, when take them out and lay aside; 
add the curry powder, minced onions, and salt ; mix 
all well, let them cook for a few minutes, stirring 
continually ; then add the meat ; keep the whole 
constantly stirred, and gradually add sufficient boil- 
ing water, but only just enough, to keep all soft. Let 
it stew for twenty minutes, then add the browned 
onions chopped fine, cover for five minutes by the side 
of the fire, and serve with a border of plain boiled rice. 



48 b:6ohauff£s ojt poultby. 



rEchautfEs of POULTET. 



No. 14.— BLAKQUBTTB OF FOWI.. 

Gut the meat from a cold roast or boiled fowl in 
quite small pieces. Take the bones, and stew down 
in one pint and a half of water with a btmch of sweet 
herbs, and season with salt; strain the stock, and 
take as much as may be sufficient for the quantity of 
fowl you have ; add to it two or three mushrooms 
cut small, let them cook in the sauce, then put in the 
pieces of fowl to warm through ; thicken the sauce 
with the yolks of two eggs, add a little lemon-juice 
the last thing, and serve. 

No. TS.— HASHED FOWL. 

Out the meat from a cold fowl in smaU pieces. 
Put into a stewpan rather more than half a pint of 
well-flavored stock, add a little nutmeg, salt, andP 
pepper, and thicken with some flour and butter, and^ 
a little cream if you have it ; let it boil well, then put 
in the pieces of fowl to warm. Poach some eggs 
nicely, place them in a tempting way on the hash in 
your dish, put a sprig of parsley in the centre, aad 
garnish round the hash with neatly cut pieces of fried 
bread. 



KilOHAXTFtiJS OF POULTBY. 49 

No. '16.— FRIED CHICKBN. 

Gut a cold chicken into small joints, and pnt them 
in a deep dish, covering them with some chopped 
parsley, onion, salt, pepper, a little good salad oil, 
and squeeze over all the juice of a lemon; let the 
chicken remain in this for three or four hours, turn- 
ing the pieces every now and then ; then take them 
out, dredge over each piece with flour, and firy them. 
Pile high on a dish, and pour the following sauce 
round : — put into a stewpan two or three table-spoon- 
fuls of vinegar, according to the strength, a s&allot 
minced, a small bay-leaf, a clove of garlic, salt, pep« 
per, and half a pint of good stock, or the gravy 
from a roast joint ; let the sauce boil well, skim the 
fat off, strain through a sieve, and use. 



No. •7'7.— MINCED CHICKEN. 

Cat the meat off the bones of a cold chicken, and 
mince it small. Take half a pint of light-colored 
stock, thicken it with a little flour, flavor with salt 
and a little nutmeg, and let it boil well ; then add 
two or three mushrooms chopped small, a teacupful 
of cream or milk, and the minced chicken ; as soon as 
the mushrooms are cooked, the mince is ready. Send 
it to table with some neatly cut pieces of toast or fried 
bread round it in the dish. 



60 K^OHAlfFF^S OB POULTET. 

No. •78.— CAPILOTADB OF FOWI.. 

Divide what remains of a cold fowl into neat joints. 
Chop small three or four mushrooms, some parsley 
and shallot, pat them into a stewpan with a small 
piece of butter and let them fry for a short time, then 
moisten with a little good-flavored stock, and thicken 
with sufficient flour. Add salt to taste ; let the sauce 
boil well, put in the pieces of fowl for a few minutes, 
take them out, arrange them on a dish, pour the 
sauce over, and serve. 

No. 19.— CROQUETTES OP FOWL. 

Take what meat may be left on a cold fowl, and 
mince it very fine ; put it in a stewpan with a little 
stock, a table-spoonful of cream, a little salt and nut- 
meg, and thicken sufficiently with flour; let it boil 
well, then pour it out on a deep dish, and set it aside 
to get quite cold and set. Then divide it into smaU 
portions, form them into small balls or sausage shapes, 
roll each in fine bread crumbs, then egg over with 
beaten yolk of egg^ roll again in bread crumbs, and 
fry a light color. Dish on a napkin with some fried 
parsley in the centre of the pile of -croquettes. 

NOk 80.— CROMESQUIS OP POWL. 

Proceed as in the previous receipt, only adding to 
the mince two table-spoonfuls of grated ham or 



b:6chafff^s of poultry. 61 

tong<ie, and instead of oovering the balls with egg 
and bread crumbs, dip each in batter, &j a light 
color, and serve very hot 

No. 81.— SCALLOPED OHIOKBN. 

Cnt some cold fowl into very small pieces, and put 
it into a stewpan with a little white sauce, or, if you 
have no white sauce, a little stock, a table-spoonful 
of cream, and a little flour ; season with salt and nut- 
meg ; let it boil, stirring constantly, and when thick 
enough, All your scallop shells with this preparation ; 
cover them with fine bread crumbs, sprinkle over 
with some oiled butter, and brown the scallops in the 
oven or before the fire. 

No. 82.— VOL-AU-YENT OP OHIOEEN. 

Make a vol-au-vent case of puff paste, and fill it 
when baked with the minced chicken (No. 77), put a 
few button mushrooms stewed in white sauce on the 
top, and serve. 

No. 83.— CHICKEN PUDDING 1 LA EEINB. 

Cut the meat from a cold fowl, and pound it in a 
mortar, carfuUy taking away the skin and sinews. 
Take a small tea-cupful of rice, and let it boil in a little 
good-flavored, light-colored stock till the rice is done 
and has soaked up the stock; then add to it the 
pounded chicken, a tea-cupful of cream, salt, and a 



62 BiiCHAUFFijS OF POITLTRY. 

little white pepper and nntmeg ; mix all thoroughly 
together, adding more cream if not moist enough. 
Batter a plain tin mould, £111 it with the rice and 
chicken, flour the top, tie a pudding-cloth closely over, 
and put the mould into a stewpan of hot water, to 
boil for an hour; but be careful the water does not 
reach the top of the tin, so as to get into the pudding. 
When done, turn it out of the mould, and serve 
round it in the dish a white sauce in which you have 
stewed button mushrooms ; or you may use instead, 
if you prefer it, a good oyster sauce (No. 218). 

No. 84.—RISS0LES OF CHICKEN. 

Make some puff paste, roll it out even and rather 
^in, then cut it in thick rounds the size of the top of 
a large wine-glass. Lay on half of each of these a 
little of the preparation for croquettes of fowl (No* 
79), moisten the edges of the paste with a little 
water, turn over the other half of the round, and 
press the edges together, so as to make the rissoles 
somewhat of the shape of a cocked hat. Fry these a 
light color, drain well from the fat, and serve very 
hot, dished high on a napkin, and garnished with 
fried parsley. 

No. 85.— QUENELLES OP FOWL. 

Take the white meat from a cold fowl, carefully 
taking away the skin and the sinews, pound it in a 



K&OHAUrFis OF POULTBT. 53 

mortar, and force the pounded meat through a coarse 
eieye ; take half the bulk of the meat in crumb of 
bread, soak it in milk, add to it the pounded fowl, 
some salt, pepper, a little nutmeg, and the yolks of 
two eggs ; mix all thoroughly together, and pound it 
again. Then beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff 
snow firoth, mix weU and lightly with the pounded 
fowl, bread, etc., and divide the preparation into 
pieces ; give them the form of an egg (not too large), 
poach them in boiling water, drain well, and serve 
in a good-flavored white sauce, or you may use them 
as a garnish for a boiled fowl or turkey poult. Que- 
nelles, to be good, ought to be as light and spongy 
as possible, therefore the number of eggs added must 
depend upon the quantity of fowl and bread that you 
use. And if you intend to serve your quenelles as an 
entree, you may butter some small tin cups, fill them 
with the quenelle preparation, and boil them, turning 
them out when done, and serving them with a nice 
white sauce, which you have flavored with mush- 
rooms. 

No. 86.— MAYONNAISE OF CHICKEN. 

Out up the remains of a cold boiled fowl into small 
joints, or you may take the meat from the bones in 
smallish-sized pieces. Put them into a deep dish 
with a little oil, vinegar, or lemon-juice, pepper, salt, 
chopped onion, and parsley, and let them remain in 



64 bAohauffAb of poultry, 

this for a few hours, turning the pieces oocasionally, 
and covering the dish closely over. Make a sauce of 
the following ingredients: — ^take the yolks of two 
hard-boUed eggs, pound them well, and mix with the 
yolk of a raw egg^ a salt-spooniul of very finely 
chopped shallot, salt, white pepper, a very little 
pounded sugar, and add some good salad oil by 
degrees (a drop at a time, or you will curdle tbe 
sauce if you pour it in too quickly), stirring it con- 
stantly. When getting too thick, moisten with a 
little tarragon vinegar, then add more oil, and again 
vinegar, till you have sujQicient sauce for your ma- 
yonnaise. The proportion of oil to vinegar is three 
of the former to one of the latter,, and you must be 
guided by taste as to the quantity of 8alt,.pepper, and 
shallot or onion ; also, should the vinegar be weak, a 
little more than the above proportion may be used, 
bearing in mind that this sauce must be thick and 
highly flavored, or when the cream is added it will 
be sloppy and tasteless. Boil six eggs for ten 
minutes, throw them into cold water, and when 
perfectly cold, take off the shells, cut a small slice 
off the white part at the large end of the eggs, so as 
to allow them to stand upright, and then cut each 
into quarters lengthwaysi, . Butter, thickly a etiip an 
inch wide round the edge of a dish, and on this fix 
the. quarters of egg upright and closely together, the 
white of the egg being outside, and the butter keep- 



B^OHAUI^Fis OF POULTEY. 66 

ing the border of eggs quite firm. Inside this, pat a 
layer of well dried and shred cabbage lettuce, or if 
they are very small, as they are early in the season, 
you may place a row of these little heads inside the 
egg border; fill in the centre with the pieces of 
fowl you have drained from the oil, vinegar, etc., 
keeping them piled high in the dish. Then, the last 
thing before serving, take a gill of good cream, whip 
it lightly, and mix carefiilly with the sauce you havie 
made, pour over the fowl, taking care that it does 
not touch the egg border, and serve at once. You 
may place little pieces of very red beet-root, cut out 
with a steel vegetable cutter, and a leaf of parsley 
alternately between the quarters of egg, by way of 
more garnish, if you like it. 

No. 87.— aiULLED LEGS OF TURKEY. 

Score the legs of a cold turkey very deeply, and 
pour into the cuts that you have made some oiled 
butter, and sprinkle weU with salt, pepper, and a 
little cayenne ; grill over a clear fire, and serve very 
hot, with the following sauce round them: — take four 
large onions, peel them, and chop them rather small, 
put them into a stewpan with a little butter, and let 
them fry a good color, but not black; then add 
more than half a pint of good-flavored stock, thicken 
with a little flour, stir in a dessert-spoonful of ready- 
made mustard, salt to taste, and let the sauce boil 



66 KfeOHAUFFilS OF POULTRY. 

well ; skim it, and the last thing, add the juice of half 
a lemon, and use as directed. 

No. 88.--QUENELLBS OF TURKEY. 

Take as much of the white meat as yoa require 
from a cold turkey (keeping out the skin and 
sinews), and pound it in a mortar ; take half as much 
in bulk of crumb of bread, soak it in milk, and add 
to the pounded turkey with a small piece of butter; 
mix thoroughly and pound aU together, then put in 
the yolks of two or three eggs, according to the 
quantity ^of the turkey, etc., some salt, pepper, a 
little nutmeg, and pound the whole again. Next 
whip the whites of the eggs to a stiff snow froth, 
mix them well and lightly with the pounded ingre- 
dients, and divide into small pieces, to which you 
give the shape of little thick sausages ; dredge them 
with flour, fry them a light color, and serve piled 
high on a napkin, garnished with sprigs of fried 
parsley. 

No. 89.— OAPILOTADB OF TURKEY. 

Cut up the remains of a cold roast turkey into nice- 
sized pieces. Then take four or five middle-sized 
mushrooms, two shallots, and a few sprigs of parsley: 
mince them all very small, and put them into a stew- 
pan with a small piece of butter ; after they have 
cooked a little while, dredge in some flour to thicken 



Ki)0HAXJFF]fe8 OP POULTEY. 67 

the sauce, stir constantly, and add three-quarters of 
a pint of good stock, a small glass of white wine, and 
salt to taste ; let the sauce boil well, skim it care- 
fully, and then put in the pieces of turkey to warm 
slowly ; serve with fried crusts of bread round the 
dish. 

No. 90.— TUEKBY SALAD. 

Gut some of the meat from a cold boiled or braised 
turkey in small pieces, and put them into a deep dish 
with four table-spoonfuls of good salad oil, one and a 
half of vinegar, a small onion, a shallot, some parsley, 
green tarragon, and chervil, all chopped fine, and 
salt and pepper. Let the pieces of turkey soak in 
this for four hours, turning them occasionally, and 
covering the dish. closely. Then put some well-dried 
and shred lettuce on a dish, take the pieces of turkey 
from the oil and vinegar, and arrange them in the 
centre of the lettuce. Take two raw yolks of eggs, 
beat them a little in a basin, and add by slow degrees 
the oil, vinegar, chopped herbs, etc., from which you 
have taken the turkey, stirring all the time till the 
sauce is quite smooth; taste it, and, if necessary, add 
more salt or pepper ; pour this sauce over the turkey 
and salad ; arrange romid the edge, or in a pattern 
in the centre, as you like best, olives and slices of 
hard-boiled eggs alternately, and serve. 



68 B^CHAUFrfsS OF POULTEY. 

No. 91.— GATEAU OF RABBIT. 

If you have much of the meat left on the bones of 
a large boiled rabbit, or a couple of small ones, yon 
may miake the remains into an excellent dish. Cut 
the meat from the bones, leaving out the skin ajid 
sinews, and pound it in a mortar ; take half its bulk 
of crumb of bread, soak it in milk or broth (if you 
use the latter, put in a small piece of fresh butter), 
and pound again with the rabbit, adding salt, pepper, 
a little nutmeg, and the yolks of two or three eggs, 
according to the size of your gateau. Then beat the 
whites of the eggs to a stiff snow froth, mix well 
in with the pounded meat, etc., and fill a plain tin 
mould which you have previously buttered; flour 
over the top, tie a cloth upon it, and put into a stew- 
pan of water to boil for an hour ; take care that the 
water does not get into the mould, and when the 
gateau is done turn it out upon a dish, and pour the 
following sauce round it:— take rather more than 
half a pint of good-flavored stock, add a thickening 
of arrow-root, sufficient browning to make the sauce 
a good color, not too dark, and a glass of white 
wine. Light French wine or champagne is best for 
the purpose, but sherry or any white wine will do, 
only, if of the stronger kind, using a smaller quan- 
tity of it. Let it boil up, pour round the gateau, 
and serve. 



Ki;OHAtTFF]feS OF POUIiTRY. 69 

No. 92.— HASHED RABBIT. 

Cat off the meat that is left from a cold boiled 
or roast rabbit in small pieces^ and you may add to 
them if you like a small quantity of cold roast 
mutton, also cut in little slices. Break small the 
bones of the rabbit, and put them into a stewpan 
with a little bit of butter, a shallot, a clove of garlic, 
a bay-leaf, some thyme, basil, and parsIey,^ and let 
them cook in the butter with a table-spoonful of 
flour for a short time, stirring constantly; then pour 
in a small wine-glassful of port wine, and rather 
more than half a pint of stock ; let it boil slowly 
by the side of the fire, well covered over for half 
an hour ; skim the sauce, strain it through a sieve, 
put in the pieces of rabbit and mutton, let them warm 
through, and serve with neatly cut pieces of toast or 
fried bread round the hash. 

No. 93.— RABBIT FRITTERS. 

Cut the meat from a cold rabbit in small slices, 
put them in a deep dish, sprinkle them with parsley, 
chives, thyme, and a clove of garlic, all chopped to- 
gether quite fine, a bay-leaf, salt, and pepper, and 
pour over all a glass of white wine (French or 
Khenish if you have it), and the juice of a lemon. 
Let the pieces of rabbit soak in this, well covered 
over, for two hours; then take them out, dredge 



60 KfeOHAXTPrAs OF POITLTBT. 

them well over with flour, and plunge them into 
boiling fat to take a good yellow color ; drain them 
well from the fat, pile them in a dish, and pour the 
following sauce round. For the sauce, take the wine, 
lemon-juice, herbs,^tc., that the rabbit has been 
soaking in, add half a pint of stock and a little thick- 
ening of flour and butter, and let it boil well ; then 
strmn it through a sieve, put in a table-spoon^ of 
piccalilli chopped fine, give it another boil, and serve. 



irfjOHAUFFis OF FAME. 61 



EfiCHAUFFfiS OF GAME. 



No. 94— HASHED VENISON. 

Cut some cold venison in nice slices. Take four or 
five anchovies, wash and scrape them, then put them 
in a stewpan with a little water to boil till they are 
dissolved, then add ten oysters, with the liquor that 
runs firom them, a large wine-glassful of port wine, a 
table-spoonful of mushroom catchud, and a teacupful 
of milk ; let all boil up, stirring well, then put in the 
slices of venison to warm through only, and serve it 
at once with some neatly cut toasted bread round the 
edge of the hash. 

No. 95.— MINCED VENISON. 

Cut off some slices of cold venison, and mince the 
meat quite fine, leaving out the skin and sinews. 
Put into a stewpan a small wine-glassful of vinegar, 
a shallot chopped small, a bay-leaf, a clove of garlic, 
pepper, salt, and half a pint of broth, or the gravy 
from a roast joint ;.boil this sauce well, skim it, strain 
it, and then waim the minced venison in it, and send 
to table with pieces of fried bread round it in the 
dish. 



03 B^OHATTFFiiS OF GAMS. 

No. 96.— VENISON SAUSAOBa 

Cat some slices of cold venison, not too mnch 
roasted, and mince them very small ; take one-third 
of the quantity of venison of the fat of cold boiled 
bacon, and mince also very fine ; season with salt, 
pepper, and a little nutmeg ; mix all well together, 
and moisten with some of the gravy from the joint 
of venison. Fill some fresh sausage-skins with the 
mixture, making the sausages small ; grill them, and 
serve very hot. Venison sausages make an excellent 
dish for breakfast. 

No. at.— VENISON PUFFS. 

Cut some cold venison in very thin shavings, not 
larger or thicker than a sovereign ; mix a little red 
currant jelly with some rich brown gravy, and add 
to the shavings of venison. Have ready some light 
puff paste, roll it out very thin, divide it in pieces, 
put some of the meat in each, and form them into 
puf& ; brush them over with white of egg^ and bake 
quickly a delicate brown color. 

No. 98.— GAME PATTIES. 

Make as many patties of a small size as you require 
for your dish of good light puff paste, egg them over, 
and bake them a nice light color. Fill the centres 
with minced venison or hare, or a mince of any kind 



e:6ohaitff:6s of gamb. 63 

of game ; dish them on a napkin, and send to table 
quite hot. 

No. 99.— GATEAU OF HARE. 

If there is much of the meat left on a cold hare, 
you can make it into a gateau. Out all the meat 
from the bones, take out the skin and sinews, and 
pound the meat quite fine, adding the liver of the 
hare, a small piece of fresh butter, and half the bulk 
of the meat in crumb of bread soaked in broth or 
stock ; pound all well again, season with salt, mix 
in the yolks of two or three eggs, according to the 
quantity you have of the meat, etc., then beat the 
white of the eggs to a stiff snow froth, stir them well 
and lightly in, and put the mixture into a plain tin 
mould, which you have previously buttered ; flour 
the top, tie a cloth over it, and ^t it in a stewpan of 
water to boil gently for an hour, taking care that the 
water does not get into the mould ; when done, turn 
it carefully out of the mould upon a dish, pour the 
following sauce round, and serve. For the sauce, 
take the bones and any pieces of the hare that you 
could not pound, break the bones small, and stew 
them down in nearly a quart of water, till reduced to 
half the quantity ; then strain the stock, add a wine- 
glassful of port wine, a large table-spoonfal of red 
fcurrant jelly, and salt to taste ; let the sauce boil up, 
and use as directed. 



64 B^OHAUFFis OF GAIO:. 



No. 100.— SALMIS OF PARTRIDGES. 

Cut up what is left of cold partridges, and set 
aside all the good parts ; take what is left of the 
boDes, etc., and pound them in a mortar, and put 
into a stewpan with a small piece of fresh batter, a 
shallot, a bay-leaf, and some sprigs of parsley. Liet 
all brown a little, stirring constantly; then add a 
table-spoonful of flour, three-quarters of a pint of 
stock or broth, and a glass of white wine. Let all 
boil slowly for some time, and when done, strain 
through a sieve; warm the pieces of partridge in 
this sauce, and serve with pieces of fried bread 
round the salmi in the dish. 



No. 101.— COLD SALMIS OF PARTRIDGES. 

Proceed as in the previous receipt, only do not 
warm the joints of partridge in the sauce, but ar- 
range them cold on a dish, sprinkling them* over 
with a little of the sauce ; to the rest of which, add 
a quarter of an ounce of Nelson's gelatine dissolved 
in as little water as possible ; stir the sauce well, so 
as to mix the gelatine thoroughly with it, and when 
thick and cold, but not quite set, pour it carefally 
over the pieces of partridge in your dish, so as to 
glaze them ; put a border round of savory jelly (No. 
388), cut in diamonds about two inches long, ar- 



«;. 



;u mai I !■■ ■ T 



B^HATTFF^S OF GAME. 65 

ranged as yon would oatlets, and serve for luncheon, 
supper, or a third course at dinner. 

No. 102.— PARTEIDGB SALAD. 

Cut up a cold partridge into small-sized joints, 
and put them into a deep dish ; pour over them four 
table-spoonfuls of good salad oil, one and a half of 
tarragon vinegar, and a table-spoonful of meat jelly ; 
season with pepper, salt, and sprinkle with the fol- 
lowing herbs, chopped fine: — equal quantities of 
parsley, tarragon, chives, and chervil, in the propor- 
tion of one and a half table-spoonfuls of the chopped 
herbs to a partridge. Let the pieces of partridge 
remain in this mixture for two hours in a cool place, 
well covered over, then take them out and place 
them neatly on a layer of well-dried shred lettuce ; 
decorate the partridge with pickled gherkins cut in 
small pieces, slices of hard-boiled eggs, fillets of an- 
chovies, and savory jelly (No. 888), cut in diamond 
or round shapes. Pour the mixture in which the 
partridge was steeped over the lettuce and the par- 
tridge, and serve. 

No. 103.— HASHED PHEASANT. 

Cut up what is left of one or two pheasants into 
small neat joints. Put an ounce of butter into a 
stewpan with half an ounce of flour, which stir over 
the fire for two or three minutes, till beepming 

5 



66 SEOHAUTFES OF GAME. 

slightly broivned; then add a glass of port wine, 
half a pint of second stock, an onion chopped, and a 
bnnch of sweet herbs, and salt to taste ; boil at the 
comer of the stove, stirring and skimming occasion- 
ally, till sufficiently thick to adhere to the back of 
the spoon; then pat in the pieces of pheasant, with a 
little coloring if necessary. Let it remain ten min- 
ntes at the comer of the stove, bat it must not boil ; 
arrange the pieces of pheasant upon your dish, poar 
the sauce through a sieve over them, and serve hot. 

No. 104.— PHEASANT SALAD. 

Gut up a cold pheasant, and proceed as for the 
turkey salad (No, 90), or you- may make it into a 
miEiyonnaise (No. 86), if preferred. 

No. 105.— QUENELLE^ OF PHEASANT. 

Proceed as for quenelles of fowl (No. 85). Boil 
the preparation in little tin moulds well buttered, 
turn them out, and serve them with a good brown 
sauce, which should be clear, flavored with the bones 
of the pheasant, and thickenpd with arrow-root. 

No. 106.— SALMIS OF WOODCOCKS. 

Cut up cold woodcocks into joints ; chop small all 
that is in the inside, excepting the gizzard. Put 
into a stewpan a small piece of butter and a little 
flour, stir them together over the fire till they take a 



BilCHAUBF:i}S OF GAME. 67 

good color, then add rather more* than half a pint of 
good-flavored stock, a shallot chopped, a bay-leaf, 
some sprigs of parsley, and a little rasped crust of 
bread ; let all boil at the side of the fire, take out the 
bay-leaf aid the parsley, then put in a glass of white 
"wiue, the inside of the bird which you have chopped 
up, and a little salt ; stir well, boil till the sauce is 
reduced a little, put in the pieces of woodcock to 
warm, and serve with sippets of fried bread round 
the dish. 

No. 10'7.— GROtrSE SALAD. 

Cut up the cold grouse, put the joints of the birds 
in a deep dish, and pour over them two table-spoon- 
fuls of oil and the juice of a lemon, with some salt 
and pepper, and let them remain in this for two or 
three hours. Take the yolk of a hard-boiled egg^ 
put it in a basin, pound it smooth, and mix it well 
with the yolk of a raw eggy a teaspoonful of salt, a 
third of that quantity of pepper, a little cayenne, and 
half a teaspoonful of finely chopped onion, pouring 
in by degrees, a drop at a time, some good salad oil ; 
stir constantly, and when getting too thick, thin it 
with a little tarragon vinegar ; then add more oil, 
and again vinegar, till you have a sufficient quantity 
of sauce, which should be of the consistency of thick 
cream ; taste it, and if more salt or pepper or vine- 
gar is required, add it. Then put some well-washed 



68 B^OHAUFFilS OF GAMB. 

shred lettaee on a dish, place the pieces of grouse 
(which have been in the oil and lemon-juice) npon it 
nicely arranged^ pour the sauce over, and decorate 
the top with fillets of anchovies, well washed and 
scraped, slices of hard-boiled eggs, and very small 
sprigs of chervil or parsley. Round the edge of the 
dish yon may add, if you like it, a border of savory 
jelly, broken up unalL 



SOUPS. 69 



SOUPS. 



No. 108.— OYSTER SOUP. 

Take a cow-heel, and set it on the Bre in a clean 

stewpan of water till the water boils, when yon must 

take it off and throw it into cold water ; let it stand 

all night, then lay it on a sieve to drain. Take snf- 

ficient meat of beef and veal to make a good stock; 

let it cool, and then take off bU the fat. Throw into 

your stewpan a little floor, make it a nice brown, 

and add the stock by degrees, stirring all the time 

yoa are pouring it in; then add two glasses of 

madeira, with part of the meat of the cow-heel, cut 

in little pieces the size of an oyster bearded, and let 

all stew very gradually for two hours, when put in 

about a score of oysters bearded, and the liquor 

which runs from them strained, with some celery, 

and boil all well up. This soup should be made the 

day before it is wanted. 

Na 109.--GHOWDBR, OR COD'S HEAD SOUP. 

Take two cods'-heads, and boil them down in water 
to a thick soup. Wash and grate two middling-sized 



70 SOUPS. 

oarrots, and mix with sufficient powdered biscnit to 
thicken the soup (if you like you may add a captain's 
biscuit cut in slices), and flavor with sweet marjoram, 
summer savory, two good-sized onions sliced, pep- 
per, salt, and a little cayenne. Then slices of cod 
or haddock are to be put into the soup, and boiled 
twenty minutes before serving up. 

No. 110.— SCOTCH FISH AND SOXJP. 

Take four or six haddocks, according to the size, 
wash them well, and put them on to boil in three 
quarts of water ; when half done, take them out of 
the saucepan, cut off the heads, and the tails .about 
two inches up the length of the fish, and return these 
trimmings to the saucepan of water in which you 
began to boil them, together with a large onion sliced, 
a handful of parsley, a blade of mace, and let all stew 
by the side of the fire, to make a good stock, for two 
hours, skimndog it well ; then strain it. Take the 
best parts of the fish which you set aside, divide 
each through the bones into three or four pieces, 
which put into the stock to boil till sufficiently 
cooked, when they must be served up in the soup im- 
mediately, or they will break to pieces. Add salt to 
flavor, and the last thing before sending to table, 
thicken the soup with a little flour and a teacupful 
of cream or milk. 



SOUPS. 71 

No. 111.— ECONOMICAL WHITE SOUP. 

Take one pound of loin of veal, cat it in small 
pieces, and pat it on to stew with a quarter of a 
pound of Carolina rice and a small quantity of onion 
in two quarts of new milk, till the rice is perfectly 
8o:ft, adding a little white pepper and salt to taste ; 
then press it through a sieve to the thickness of rich 
cream. The soap must be warmed again after 
straining, but not boiled, as that would curdle it. If 
more flavor is liked, a little cut celery and a very 
small bit of lemon-peel, with a blade of mace, may be 
added. 

No. 112.— WHITE SOUP. 

This white vegetable soup will be found most ex- 
cellent. Take four or five good turnips, six heads 
of celery, four fine leeks, and wash them, and slice 
them down ; then put them into a stewpan with a 
piece of butter and some ham ; moisten with a quart 
of stock, and let them stew gently till tender ; then 
add a pint of good cream and some crumbs of bread. 
Give all a good boil up, strain, and send to table 
very hot. 

No. 113.— SOUP 1 L4 BONNE FBMME. 

Slice three onions, which fry in some butter on a 
slow fire for a quarter of an hour ; then add twelve 



73 80TJPS. 

potatoes, also sliced, ^hich you must fiy with the 
onions another quarter of an hour ; then add two 
quarts of good stock (veal if you have it), and let it 
hoil for half an hour ; then pass the whole through a 
sieve. Put it hack into the stewpan, and let it sim- 
mer for a quarter of an hour ; skim it, add a little 
sugar, salt, and a quarter of a pint of good cream or 
milk ; let it come to a hoil, then serve it up. If you 
do not require all the soup at once, do not add the 
cream or milk till it is wanted for use. 

No. 114— POTATO SOUP. 

Cut a moderately sized hreast of mutton into small 
pieces, and put it into threei^uarts of water ; make 
it hoil, skim it carefully, and season the hroth with 
pepper and salt to your taste. Peel and cut into 
quarters six large and sound potatoes and thi'ee tur- 
nips, slice up four onions and three heads of celery, 
and throw all these into the hroth, with a good-sized 
handful of sweet herhs. Let all stew together for 
four hours and a half over a slow fire ; strain off the 
liquid, take out the mutton, and force as much of the 
vegetahles as possihle through a coarse sieve with a 
wooden spoon, and return the pulp to the soup'; heat 
up the yolks of two eggs with a quarter of a pint of 
cream, or milk, if you have no cream ; stir all well 
together, and warm it up for sending to tahle. 



SOUPS. 73 

No. 116.— TITRNIP SOUP. 

Take two quarts of good light-colored stock ; cut 
in pieces a bunch of turnips, three heads of celery, 
three onions, and boil them in the stock two hours, 
till they are quite tender ; then rub all through a 
'sieve, and when it is near time to serve up, add the 
yolks of four eggs with half a pint of cream or 
milk, and a very little white sugar, and warm it. The 
soup must not stand long, nor be aliowed to boO. 
after the eggs are put in. 

Uo. 116.--CAIIB0T SOU]?. 

Take two quarts of stock, and to this add from six 
to ten carrots, according to the size, three turnips, 
three or four onions, and let them stew till tender. 
Then take out the vegetables, strain /the soup, and 
with a spoon take off the red part of the carrots from 
the yellow centre, and force it through a coarse 
sieve ; add the pulped carrot to the soup, till it is as 
thick as good cream ; warm it, and serve at once. 

No. 117.— PARSNIP SOUP 

Take six large parsnips, two onions, and one good- 
sized head of celery, cut them in pieces, and stew 
them till tender in two quarts of light-colored stock ; 
then take out the vegetables, pulp them through a 
coarse sieve ; return the pulp to the soup, flavor with 



74 ' SOUPS, 

a 



little white pepper, salt, and a small quantrty of 
sugar ; let it boil up, and just before serving add a 
quarter of a pint of cream. 

No. 118.— VEGETABLE-MARROW SOUP. 

Slice down a large and somewhat old vegetable- 
marrow, two onions, a head of celery, and put them 
into a stewpan with two ounces of butter ; let them 
stew ten minutes, then add three pints of stock, salt 
and pepper to taste, and let all boil gently till the 
vegetables are quite tender ; then press them through 
a coarse sieve, and heat the soup before sending to 
table. It should be made rather thick with the 
pulped vegetables. 



No. 119.— GREEN-PEA SOUP. 

Take one quart (shelled) of o\^ green peas, a head 
of celery, three lettuces, two onions, a small sprig of 
mint, a bunch of sweet herbs, and a quarter of a 
pound of lean ham or bacon, and let them boil till 
the peas are quite soft, in rather more than two 
quarts of stock, which need not be strong for this 
purpose ; strain the soup through the meat and vege- 
tables, press the latter with a wooden spoon through 
a sieve into the soup, add salt, a teaspoonful of 
pounded white sugar, and make it quite hot, putting 
in while doing so sufficient spinach-juice to give the 
soup a good green color. 



SOUPS. 75 

No. 120.— GRBEN-PEA SOUP WITHOUT PEAS. 

Those who possess a kitchen garden can obtain 
this excellent sonp early in the season, but only by 
eacrificmg a part of a row of peas. When the plants 
are about eight inches high, cut off about three feet 
in the length of a row close to the ground, and boil 
tbem, till the leaves are quite soft, in three pints of 
stock, flavoring with salt and a little sugar ; press 
all these through a sieve, and thicken the soup with 
a little flour and butter ; give it a boil, and serve at 
once. This soup, though only made from the young 
leaves of the plants, will be found to have the same 
flavor as that given by the fuU-grown peas, and if 
it should not be well colored, add spinach-juice till 
sufficiently green. 

No. 121.— SCOTCH HOTCH-POTCH. 

Take a moderate-sized neck of mutton, pare away 
the fat, and cut off the scrag end, which you must 
put into a soup-pot with a quart (shelled) of old 
green peas, a large handful' of young onions, or two 
old ones sliced, four young carrots, two turnips, a 
dessert-spoonful of salt, and a bunch of sweet herbs ; ,n 

stew all gently by the side of the Sre in three quarts 
of water for three hours ; then take out the meat, 
beat the vegetables through a coarse sieve into the 
soup, and return it to the soup-pot, putting in the 



76 sotnps. 

rest of the neck of mutton, cat into chops, and stew 
them in the soap half an hoar, when add nearly a 
pint (shelled) of yoong peas, a large caaliflower 
broken into branches, and two or three lettuces cut 
into quarters. Let all boil, and by the time the 
vegetables are done, the hotch-potch will be ready, 
and should be served immediately. This most deli- 
cious preparation, though sent to table as a soup, is in 
reality more of a stew, and with its combinations of 
soup, meat, and vegetables, forms by itself a most 
substantial dinner. The soup should be of the thick- 
ness of good cream, and the peas, cauliflower, and 
lettuces, that are added at the last, ^ould only be 
cooked in the soup long enough to make them ten- 
der ; the lettuces, of course, taking a shorter time 
than the peas and cauliflower, must be put in the 
last. 

No. 122.— RA3BIT SOUP. 

Take a couple of wild rabbits, skin them, and cut 
off the best parts into nice pieces, to be served up in 
the soup ; do not wash them, but season, flour, and 
fry them light brown ; put them in a stewpan with 
some good gravy in which the other parts of the 
rabbits have been stewed, with an ouion and a bunch 
of sweet herbs, and then make a thickening exactly 
the same as for mock turtle soup, and strain to the 
rabbit. Take out the onion and herbs, cut some 



{ 



SOUPS. 77 

carrots ^and turnips, and add, with some small onions, 
to tlie soup, for which two quarts of second stock is 
sufficient. Boil up, and serva 

No. 123.— SCOTCH HARE SOUP. 

Cut up a hare in pieces ; save all the blood, to 
which add water in which aU the pieces have been 
well washed, and set this aside with the best pieces 
of the meat, to be served up in the soup. Boil the 
inferior parts with spice and vegetables for a stock ; 
when it is strained and cool, add the blood, meat, 
and some flour to thicken it, and never leave off 
stirring the soup one way till it boils. Put in no salt 
till it is ready to serve. 

No. 124.—FRENCH SOUP. 

Clean nicely a sheep's head ; put to it one gallon 
of water, which reduce, to half the quantity, a small 
tea-cupful of pearl barley, six large onions, one car- 
rot, one turnip, a few cloves, a bunch of sweet herbs, 
pepper, salt, a little mushroom or walnut catchup, and 
and a bit of French onion, if you have it. Strain all 
of^ cut part of the head into pieces, and serve in the 
soup ; if you add forcemeat, add egg-balls also, and 
a very little white wine. This soup is little inferior 
to good mock turtle. 



78 sotrps. 

No. 125.— PIG'S HEAD MOCK TURTLE SOUP. 

Take a pig's head, set aside the cheeks, which may 
be cared ; partly boil the rest, then cut up the meat 
into neat square pieces, and put the bones to stew in 
three quarts of second stock, that has been well 
flavored with vegetables, sweet herbs, pepper and 
salt ; then strain, and set by to cool. The next day 
take off all the fat from the stock, heat it in a steir- 
pan, thicken with flour and butter, and add the 
pieces of meat with forcemeat and egg-balls. The 
meat should be flrst simmered in the stock for a quar- 
ter of an hour before the forcemeat balls are added, 
and the egg-balls should only be put in just before 
sending to table. Make the forcemeat balls of finely 
chopped suet, bread crumbs, a little veal and ham or 
tongue to flavor, also finely chopped sweet herbs, 
pepper, and salt ; bind all together with a little yolk 
of egg^ make up into small balls, with a sprinkle of 
flour, and either fry them in hot fat, or boil them for 
a few minutes, and drain well before putting into the 
soup. For the egg-balls, take the yolks of two hard- 
boiled eggs, and half the yolk of a raw ^gg^ mix 
together, rub through a wire sieve, make into a paste 
with a sprinkle of flour, form into small balls, and 
boil two or three minutes in a little water. Flavor 
the soup with a little mushroom catchup or Harvey's 
sauce, a squeeze of lemon, and a little white wine. 



SOUPS. 79 

No. 126.— MOCK TURTLE SOUP. 

Boil half a calf's head with the skin on for three 
quarters of an hour ; having removed the eye, ear, 
and brains, cut the meat from the bones into pieces 
an inch and a half square, and put it into a large 
stewpan ; to this add two ounces of butter, a quar- 
ter of a pint of sherry or madeira, a gill of boiling 
broth made from veal, a faggot tied together of pars- 
ley, thyme, maijoram, winter savory, or sweet basil, 
and sage, a small onion, chopped very fine, half a 
tearspoonful of beaten cloves and* allspice mixed, one 
tea-spoonful of white pepper, and salt, and a very 
little cayenne. Put it closely covered down on the 
fire to stew gently till the meat is tender, and then 
add to it two quarts of good veal stock, and take it 
off the fire tiU the thickening is made as follows : — 
a quarter of a pound of fresh butter is to be put into 
a clean frying-pan with some chopped parsley, thyme, 
and marjoram, till they have fried a little, then add 
two table-spoonfuls of flour, and stir it till quite 
smooth ; take it off the fire, and stir in gradually a 
quarter of a pint of quite cold veal broth, taking 
care to keep it smooth ; strain, and put to the soup, 
firom which you have taken out the meat; boil it 
about ten minutes, being careM not to let it bum ; 
then strain it again to the meat of the head, and add 
the juice of half a lemon, a little more pepper ^id 



80 SOUPS. 

salty if needed, and some small forcemeat and egg- 
balls jnst before serving. 

No. 12T.-JENNY LIND'S SOUP. 

Wash a quarter of a pound of the best pearl sago 
till the water poured from it is quite dear, then ste-w 
till nearly dissolved in water or broth ; it will re- 
quire a quart of liquid, whidi should be poured on 
it cold, and then heated very slowly. Then mix 
with it gradually a pint of good boiling cream, and 
the yolks of four eggs slightly beaten, and mingle 
the whole careM]y with two quarts of strong and 
delicately flavored veal or beef «tock, which should 
be kept ready boiling, and serve. 

No. 128.--CALVES* TAIL SOUP. 

Cut up two calves' tails into pieces about two 
inches long ; put a small piece of butter into a large 
stewpan, adding the calves' tails, two carrots, one 
turnip, two large onions, with a head of celery, all 
cut into pieces, a bunch of sweet herbs, and half a 
pint of water. Set it on the fire, stirring occasion- 
ally till the bottom of the stewpan is covered with 
a light glaze, then add two ounces of flour, stir it 
well in, and fill up the stewpan with five pints of 
water; stir occasionally till it boils, skim it well, 
and then let it simmer at the side of the fire till the 
pieces of calves' tail are quite tender ; take them out 



SOUPS. 81 

of the soup, to which add salt, a little cayenne, a 
table-spoonful of mushroom catchup, and the juice 
of a lemon, and strain through a sieye upon the 
calves' tails, and serve. This soup should be a light- 
brown color, and not too thick. 

No. 129.— SCOTCH MUTTSN BROTH. 

Cut a large-sized neck of mutton in half, taking 
the scrag end for your broth, and reserving the best 
end for cutlets. Put the meat into a stewpan with 
three quarts of water, three middle-sized onions, three 
leeks, a few sprigs of parsley and thyme, and half a pint 
of Scotch barley ; place it on the fire, and let it boil 
up, skim it well, and move it to the side of the fire, 
where let it simmer for two hours ; skim it again, 
and if too thick with the barley put m half a pint of 
boiling water, then add two carrots, four turnips, 
and two heads of celery, all cut in pieces, and sim- 
mer slowly for an hour and a half or more. You 
may then take out the meat and serve it separately 
with a border of mashed turnips, or you may cut 
it in pieces and send it up in the broth. The bar- 
ley should be almost entirely dissolved, making the 

broth of the consistency of good rich cream. 
6 



t 

S2 db;es31!D fish. 



DEESSED FISH. 



No. 130.— FILLETED SOLES. 

Take the yolk of three eggs, an ounce and a half 
of bntter, and some chopped parsley, and put them 
in a small stewpan, and stir over the fire till becom- 
ing thick. The soles should be small sized, so that 
each makes four nice fillets ; put some of the above 
preparation on one side of each fiUet, turn over the 
end, and lay them in a Yorkshire pudding-dish, and 
bake in the oven, or in a Dutch oven before the fire, 
till the fish is cooked. For the sauce, make some 
oyster sauce with stock instead of water, and add to 
it a little chopped parsley, lay the fillets round your 
dish in a crown, pour the sauce in th^ middle, and 
serve. 

No. 131.— SOLES 1 LA COLBERT. 

Skin a large pair of soles on both sides, cut off the 
head and tail, raise the fish from the bone in the 
centre, and put in a stuffing of anchovies and parsley, 
finely pounded in a. mortar. Fry the soles a nice 
brown, lay them in a dish, and pour a glass or two 



DKESSEB FISH. 83 

of sherry over them ; pnt them in a Dutch oven for a 
quarter of an hour, and serve as hot as possible. 

IfTo. 132.— FILLBTED MACKEREL. 

Cut mackerel in fiUets, and fry a very light brown ; 
then put them into a stewpan, and cover with a rich 
beef gravy ; add some fennel finely chopped, a tea- 
spoonful of anchovy and Harvey sauces, and a little 
cayenne and salt. Bub the inside of the stewpan in 
which you have put the Mets well over with garlic, 
and let your fillets stew about a quarter of an hour 
over a gentle fire, and serve very hot. 

No. 133.— MACKEREL 1 LA RAVIGOTB. 

Baise the fijsh from the bones, and divide each side 
into two or three fillets according to the size of the 
mackerel; boU them, and dish them in a crown as 
you T^ould cutlets, and pour the following sauce 
round: — ^take a handfiil each of green tarragon, 
chervil^ chives, or green onions, and parsley ; parboil 
them in water with a little salt till tender, then drain 
them well, squeeze them quite dry, and pound them 
in a mortar with from one to two ounces of fresh 
butter till they are perfectly smooth ; then stir this 
mixture into rather more than half a pint of good 
melted butter (use stock, if you have it, for melting 
the butter, instead of water), give the sauce a boil, 
and the last thing before serving, add to it two tea- 



84 DRESSED FISH. 

spoonftils of tarragon vinegar. This sance should be 
quite thick, and a good green color.' 

No. 134.— SALMON WITH PIOOAT.TT.T.T SAUCE. 

Fry the slices of salmon in a very little butter till 
they are half cooked, then put them into the follow- 
ing sauce, and stew them till done. Chop a large 
onion fine, put it into a stewpan with a little bit of 
butter to brown, then add to it nearly a pint of good- 
flavored stock, thicken sufficiently with a little flour 
and butter, and then put in three table-spoonfuls of 
piccalilli and a little salt ; let the sauce boil up, lay 
the slices of salmon in it to stew, and when done 
dish them nicely, garnish with the pieces of pickle, 
pour the rest of the sauce round, and serve. 

No. 135.— SMELTS 1 LA RUSSE. 

Dredge some small-sized smelts with flour, and fry 
them in oUve oU ; drain well when done, and send 
to table very hot, and garnished with parsley. They 
should be eaten with lemon-juice. 

No. 136.— LOBSTER 1 LA MURPHY. 

Put a pat of butter into a stewpan with two table- 
spoonfuls of cream and a little lemon-juice, also some 
pieces of lemon-peel cut very thin, and melt these 
together very carefully. Then pick the meat from a 
lobster and gradually add it to the sauce, seasoning 



85 

^ain, but tike care that 
3^1!^ e immediately. 

* OTJTLETS. 

^^^> pick, and poimd the 

^^^^^-spoonfuls of bread 

flitter, a little mace, 

> aud mix thoroughly 

'^^e into the form of 

>olk of egg, then into 

^ %ht brown in butter. 

^ ^pkin, an:d stick a piece 

^ ^^ow end of each cutlet 

^^ipt and the previous 

^^ HOT. 

^ ws of a largMized fresh- 
the soft inside from the 



v,ody icareiouy le^vm^ --^ the small unwholesome 
Lee in it near the head), adding to it a small quan- 
tity of fine bread crumbs, pepper, salt, and moisten 
^tb a few spoonfols of good cream or a Uttle oiled 
butter ; mix all thoroughly together, fill .the body 
sbeU of the crab with the mixture, cover it with fine 
bread crumbs, sprinkle over with oiled butter, put it 
into the oven to heat through and brown lightly on 
the top, 9Xii serve very hot on a napkm, with a bor- 



^ 



86 BBESSED FISH. 

der of fresh parsley ronnd it. This dish is excellent 
for breakfast or luncheon, or it may be served at 
dinner ; if preferred, three or four small crabs may 
be used instead of a large one, filling each shell with 
the mixture. 

No. 139.-OYSTEa PILLAU. 

Put half a pint of Patna rice into a stewpan with 
about a pint of good gravy that has been well sear 
soned with onions, salt, pepper, and mace, and stew 
till the rice is quite tender and dry. Take two dozen 
or more oysters, beard and stew them in their own 
liquor, and then put them with their liquor into a 
moderate quantity of good melted butter as if for 
sauce; stew the beards in a little water, and add this 
liquor to the gravy in which the rice is boiled. Pile 
the boiled rice as high as you can in the dish, keep- 
ing a hollow in the centre sufficiently large to hold 
the sauce ; pour the oysters and sauce into this hol- 
low, and serve either with the fish course, or as an 
entree. 

No. 140.— OYSTER SAUSAGES. 

Take about equal quantities of veal and oysters 
(half a pound of veal will be sufficient), and chop up 
fine ; then pound them in a mortar, adding a small 
quantity of veal suet finely chopped, three table- 
spoonfuls of bread crumbs which have been soaked 



BBESSED FISH. 87 

in the liquor whicli runs from the oysters in 6pening 
them, the beaten yolks of one or two eggs, and sea- 
son the whole with white pepper, salt, and a very 
little tiny bit of mace pounded ; mix all thoroughly 
together, pound it a little more, and then make up 
the mixture into little sausages from two to three 
inches long, and fry in butter ; drain well, and send 
to table very hot, piled high on a napkin and gar- 
nished with small sprigs of parsley. Large stewing 
oysters are the best for the purpose. These sausages 
should be served as an entree. 

No. 141.— LARDED OTSTEES. 

Take twelve large-sized oysters, and as soon as 
you have opened them, cover each completely with 
a slice of &t bacon cut as thin as possible, and with- 
out a particle of lean ; then place them on a thin 
skewer, and roast them over a slice of buttered toast, 
and serve as woodcock or snipe. 

No. 142.— FRIED OYSTERS. 

Take off the beards from the oysters, dip each into 
batter, and fry them in hot fat, a light color. Drain 
them well, and serve, piled high on a napkin, as hot 
as possible, either with the fish course or as an 
>entr4e. 



X 



88 DRESSED FISH. 

No. 143— STEWED OYSTERS. 

Drain off the liquor from two or three dozen 
oysters, and dredge them lightly with flour; then 
cut up two onions very small^ and put them into a 
Btewpan with a very small bit of butter to brown for 
two or three minutes ; then add the oysters and the 
liquor strained, simmering them gently, and season, 
with a little pepper and salt, and when they are 
slightly browned, take them off the fire, stir in a few 
drops of vinegar, and serve. 

No. 144.~S0RRENT0 OYSTERS. 

Stew some macaroni in gravy till tender, season- 
ing with cayenne pepper and salt to taste ; then take 
equal parts of oysters and macaroni, and chop them 
np together, and mix weU in a stewpan with some 
grated Parmesan cheese, a little butter, and enough 
cream to moisten all sufficiently ; stir it on the lire 
till hot, then fill your scallop shells with the mixture, 
and brown them before the fire. Serve immediately 
as an entree, or with the sweet course when game 
is scarce* 



SAVOBY DISHES. 89 



SAVOET DISHES. 



No. 145.— BRAISED LEG OF MUTTON. 

Put an odIod, in which you have stuck six cloves, 
a carrot, and a turnip, with a small bunch of sweet 
herbs, into a saucepan ; butter well a leg of mutton 
and place it upon these vegetables, cover the lid 
down closely, and let it simmer by the side of the 
fire for eight or nine hours ; when done it will appear 
like a roasted joint with a quantity of rich gravy. 
Do not put any water into the saucepan. 

No. 146.— HAUNCH OP MUTTON TO TASTE LIKE 

ROEBUCK. 

Gut all the outer skin £:om the meat, which must 
then be well rubbed with the best olive oil ; put it 
next into a flat pan containing a pint of vinegar, some 
thyme, parsley, sweet basil, three^or four bay-leaves, 
four cloves of garlic, some whole pepper, three or 
four cloves, a little allspice, and a tea-spoonful of bay- 
salt. Place the meat so that the under surface may 
be in the vinegar, and cover the upper side with 
slices of onion; every morning turn the meat, putting 
the surface previously covered with onions into the 



90 SAVORY DISHES. 

vinegar, and placing the sliced onions on the side 
that was in vinegar the previous day. When four 
days have elapsed, take the me^it from the pan, wipe 
it dry, and hang it up till the following day, when it 
may be roasted for dinner exactly as venison is 
cooked. 

No. 14'7.— LOIN OF MUTTON VENISONISED, 

Bone a large loin of mutton, take the skin off from 
the fat, and put the bones and the mutton into a 
stewpan with an onion, a bit of thyme and parsley, 
a little whole pepper, and salt ; add a pint of red 
wine, cover the stewpan close, set it over a very 
slow fire for three hours, then skim off the fat clear 
from the gravy, and send the mutton to table. Serve 
with it, in a sauce-tureen, a sweet sauce made with 
currant jelly melted in a little good gravy. 

No. 148.— MUTTON CABOB. 

Take out the bone from a loin of mutton ; chop 
parsley, thyme, and shallot very fine, and mix them 
together ; then take a lump of butter the size of an 
eggy put it into a stewpan, and the herbs with it, 
adding pepper, salt, cayenne, and a very little pound- 
ed mace ; set it over the fire for about a minute, then 
take it off and beat it up with three eggs. Take 
your paste-biTLsh, and lay this stuffing where the 
bone was taken out, keeping part for the outside of 



SAVOBX DISHES. 91 

the joint; &sten on a piece of paper with small 
skewers over the stutog to prevent it Mling out ; 
put it on the spit or dangle, and roast it slowly, and 
before it is quite done, rub the rest of the stuffing 
over the mutton, sprinkle it well with fine bread 
crumbs, and finish roasting. Serve it up with a good 
gravy in the dish. It may be baked if more con- 
venient. 

* No. 149.— SAUTES OF MUTTON. 

Take part of a neck of mutton, bone it, and cut it 
up into cutlets ; butter a cutlet-pan, and sprinkle it 
over with a little shaUot, parsley, chopped mush- 
rooms, pepper, and salt ; put the cutlets over this to 
brown, and when this is done, lay them round the 
edge of a stewpan, put a little stock in the centre, 
and a sheet of white paper cut round over the cut- 
lets ; stew them for an hour over a slow fire, then 
dish them up in a crown, with stewed cucumber or 
cauliflower in the middle. 

No. 150.— BOUILLI. 

Take eight pounds of the brisket of beef and roast 
it for half an hour, then put it into a stewpan with 
four quarts of water, some carrots, turnips, celery, 
onions, sweet herbs, three cloves, pepper, and salt, 
and let it stand by the side of the fire for four hours, 
simmering slowly, but do not sufier it to boil, and 
skim it frequently. Do not add the roots till an hour 



92 SAVORY DISHES. 

after the meat has commenced Bimmering; when 
done, serve with a border of carrots and turnips cat 
small round it in the dish, or with a thick brown 
sauce, in which you must put some chopped green 
pickle or some piccalilli cut in small pieces. If you 
prefer the vegetables, boil the carrots and turnips, 
cut them into dice, and warm them either in a little 
glaze, or, if you have none, use a little butter with a 
slight dredging of flour, seasoning with pepfer and 
salt ; but should the sauce be liked, you can take for 
it a little of the stock iu which the beef has been 
stewing, adding thickening, a little burnt sugar to 
color it, salt to taste, and either of the pickles above 
mentioned. The rest of the stock will be a good 
soup, and you may send it up with some boiled ver- 
micelli in it, serving at the same time a dish of 
grated Parmesan cheese, to be eaten with the soup, 
if approved. 

No. 151.— CURED BRISKET OF BEEP FOR CHRISTMAS. 

Take fourteen pounds of brisket of beef, and at 
night rub well over it one ounce of saltpetre pounded 
very fine ; the next morning mix together half a 
pound of treacle and four handfds of common salt, 
and rub the beef well over with it. Let it remain in 
the pickle for a fortnight, turning and rubbing it 
every day, and at the end of the fortnight take it out 
and put it into an earthen pan with some suet 



SAVORY DISHES. 93 

chopped fine to cover the bottom of the pan, and the 
same on the top of the beef, with a little water to 
keep the pan from burning. Bake it slowly till you 
can slip out all the bones, and whilst hot it should be 
put into a cloth and placed between two boards till 
cold. 

No. 152--CURED BEEF TO EAT COLD. 

Take four quarts of water, one pound of bay-salt, 
three-quarters of a pound of coarse sugar, three-quar- 
ters of an ounce of allspice, the sixth part of an ounce 
of cloves, a small piece of saltpetre, and three penny- 
worth of cochineal; let these all boil together for 
fully twenty minutes, and when quite cold pour over 
a round of beef from twenty to twenty-five pounds in 
weight ; turn it every day, and it will be rea^y for 
use in a fortnight or three weeks. The beef must be 
boiled very slowly to iasure its being tender. 

No. 153.— BEEF AND MACARONI A L'lTALIENNB. 

Slice two large onions, and fry them thoroughly 
in butter. Lard a pound and a half of fillet of beef 
with fat bacon, and stew it in three pints of water 
in a stewpan with the fried onions for two hours ; 
then add a good half pound of macaroni, and boil 
gently thirty-five minutes more, when you may take 
out the beef and strain the macaroni. Dish up the 
beef, adding sufficient of the gravy, and keep it hot 



94 SAVOBT DISHES. 

before the fire whilst yon finish the macaroni, which 
yoa must put back in the stewpan, adding a large 
lump of butter and an equal quantity of grated Par- 
mesan cheese, and stir it oyer the fire for two min- 
utes ; then place it round the beef, and serve very 
hot. The best macaroni for the purpose is the nar- 
row, flat ribbon kind, or the small pipe ; if the large 
sort be used, it will require ten minutes more gentle 
boiling with the beef before it is strained from the 
gravy. 

No. 154.— BOULETTES OF BEEP. 

To one pound of beefsteak, add rather more than a 
quarter of a pound of suet, and chop them together 
very fine, flavoring them with a little chopped pars- 
ley and lemon-peel, a little cayenne pepper, a scrape 
of ginger,. a very small bit of mace pounded, a tea- 
spoonful of moist sugar, and a little salt ; to these 
put a very small quantity of bread crumbs, and the 
yolk and white of an egg well beaten ; mix all well 
together, and make into balls the size of a very small 
orange. Make a good gravy, which must be boiling 
when the boulettes are put in, and stew them for 
four hours very slowly, with the lid of the stewpan 
closely shut down. Serve them piled high in the 
centre of a dish, with a border of dressed endive, 
spinach, sorrel, or mashed turnips. 



SAVORY DISHES. 96 

No. 155.— KNUCKLE OF VEAL WITH BABLET. 

Take a knuckle of yeal, four omons, two turnips, 
two heads of celery, six pepper-corns, and a small 
blade of mace, with a tea-cupful of pearl barley, and 
boil very gently by the side of the fire for three 
hours ; skim well, add a little salt, and serve with 
the barley round the veal. The stock in which the 
meat has boiled will make good soup by adding the 
yolks of two eggs well beaten, and a little boiled 
vermicelli ; or it will serve for mulligatawny soup. 

^ No. 156.— NECK OP VEAL CUTLETS. 

Gut up the best end of the neck in cutlets, sawing 
ofifpart of the long- bones, to give them a good shape, 
and trimming them as you would mutton cutlets ; 
put them into a stewpan with two onions, two heads 
of celery sliced, a bunch of sweet herbs, a small blade 
of mace, six white pepper-corns, and a little salt, and 
add one quart of water ; let them stew very gently 
till tender, then take them out of the stock, which 
you must strain and return to the stewpan, and 
reduce it till- it becomes a very light glaze. Warm 
the cutlets in this glaze, keeping them as light as 
possible, and to insure this you may add a gill of 
thick cream to the glaze, if you have it ; then dish 
them up in the form of a crown upon a pur6e of 
potatoes. For the pur^e, take six or eight well- 



^ I 



\ 



96 SAVOBY DISHES. 

boiled mealy potatoes, mash them thoroughly, put 
them mto a stewpan with an ounce of fresh butter, a 
little salt, and moisten to a proper thickness with 
some of the white glaze, if you have any left from 
the cutlets, and crpam or milk. The proper consis- 
tency for a pur^e is rather thicker than thick pea 
soup. 

No. 157.— TURKISH PILAFF. 

Take a breakfast-cupful of rice; add to it two 
breakfast-cupiuls of boiling water, a full table-spoon- 
ful of tomato sauce (No. 362), pepper and salt, and 
boil till all the water is soaked up and the 'rice is 
tender, and the grains separate. Put a large lump 
of butter into another saucepan over the fire, till the 
butter bubbles up twice or thrice, when pour it 
gradually into the rice, stirring it well ; cover it, and 
let it simmer by the side of the fire for ten minutes. 
Cut up any kind of meat in small pieces, and half 
fry it in a little butter with a few drops of vinegar, 
but if you use poultry for the pilaff, do not add the 
vinegar ; put it in a saucepan with enough water 
to cover it, a dessert-spoonful of tomato sauce, pep- 
per and salt, and stew gradually for at least two 
hours. Serve the meat in the centre of a dish with 
the rice placed round it as a border. The rice should 
not be cooked till just before serving. 



SAVOEY DISHES. 97 

No. 158.— INDIAN FOWL PILLAU. 

Take one pound of rice, and put it in a fiying-pan 
with two ounces of butter, and keep stirring it over 
the fire till the rice is slightly browned. Have 
rdady a fowl, which put into a stewpan with five 
pints of stock, or the liquor in which mutton has been 
boiled; pouud in a mortar thirty cardamom seeds 
with the husks, half an ounce of coriander seed, and 
two ounces of cloves, allspice, mace,.cinnamon, and 
pepper-corns mixed together, which tie lightly in a 
bit of muslin, and boil with the fowl slowly till nearly 
done ; then put in the rice you have prepared, and 
let it stew till quite tender and nearly dry, adding a 
few . raisins. Then cut up two or three onions in 
slices and fry them brown ; put the fowl in a dish, 
cover it over with the rice, and lay the fried onioQS 
on the top, and garnish round the rice with hard- 
boiled eggs cut in quarters, and serve very hot. A 
dish of curried vegetables (any kinds that you may 
happen to have, cut up in pieces and mix together), 
to eat with the pillau is a great improvement to it. 

No. 159.— BENGAL CUBBY. 

For one pound of undressed meat or poultry cut 
into small pieces, the proportion of ingredients are 
as follows : — one otlnce of curry powder, two ounces 

of butter, six ounces of onions finely minced, and two 

7 



98 SAVORY DISHES. 

salt-spoonfuls of salt. Melt the batter in a stewpan, 
and when boiling hot add two large onions cut in 
slices, apd let them fry until well browned, then take 
the onioos out to lay them aside. Then put in the 
curry powder, minced onions, and salt, mix all well, 
and th^n add the meat ; keep the whole constantly 
stirred, and gradually add sufficient boiling water, 
but only just enough to keep all soft. When nearly 
ready, add the browned onions chopped fine, cover 
for five minutes, and serve with plain boiled rice. 
If curry paste is used instead of curry powder, to the 
^ pound of meat add four ounces of curry paste, two 
ounces of butter, three ounces of finely minced 
onions, and make the curry as directed above. 



No. 160.— MADRAS DRY CURRY. 

Take two table-spoonfuls of dissolved butter, one 
or two table-spoonfuls of curry powder, according to 
the strength, two table spooniuls of tamarinds or 
lemon-juice, three or four small onions, three shallots, 
and a small bit of garlic chopped all together, and 
put them into a stewpan to simmer for ten minutes ; 
then add the meat (which must not have been pre- 
viously dressed) cut up into very small pieces, and 
stew for half an hour, well mixed with the above ; 
add to the whole a pint of new milk, simmer for 
three or four hours till the meat has absorbed all the 



SAVOEY DISHES. 99 

liquid, and is quite dry ; serve with a border of nicely 
boiled rice. 

No. 161.— TO BOIL RICE FOR CURRY. 

Wash it well and then put it in a stewpan nearly 
filled with boiling water ; boil quickly for a quarter 
of an hour, and strain off the water very dry ; put a 
coarse cloth over the stewpan, let it stand near the 
fire half an hour or more, then take out the rice with 
a fork, and lay it lightly in a dish. 

No. 162.— INDIAN PTIPFS. 

. Pick a quantity of shrimps, and mince them rather 
small ; mix a little butter with the minced shrimps, 
and season with curry powder and salt; Make a 
paste of flour and water, roU it very thin, and cut it 
in pieces nearly three inches square ; put in each a 
little of the shrimp mixture, fold over into- a three- 
cornered shape, wetting the edges and pressing them, 
so as to make them stick together, and fry the puffs 
in hot fat till they take a nice light-brown color. 
Send them up very hot on a napkin, and garnish with 
small pieces of parsley. 

No. 163.— JUGGED HARE. 

Take two pounds of good beef-steaks and one pound 
of fat bacon ; cut up a hare into joints, and the beef 
into small pieces, and place layers of beef and hare 



100 . SAVORY DISHES. 

alternately in a good-sized jar that will stand in a 
large saucepan of water ; place the piece of bacon in 
the middle, season with a banch of sweet herbs, a 
piece of onion the size of a nutmeg, pepper, a few 
grains of allspice and cloves, and add one pint of 
water ; put the inferior pieces of the hare at the top 
in the jar, and let the whole stew for four hours (the 
jar being in a saucepan of boiling water), and when 
nearly done, add a little catchup^ some flour to thicken 
the gravy, and the last thing put in a glass of port 
wine, llay the beef and hare neatly in a dish, and 
garnish with the bacon sliced and some boiled carrots 
out up into small pieces. 



Ko. 164.— KIDNEYS 1 LA FRANgAISB. 

Take six mutton kidneys, remove the skin from 
them, and cut them into quarters or slices the size 
and thickness of a silver dollar. Put a good-sized 
piece of butter into your frying-pan, and then the 
kidneys ; let them fry for five minutes over a bright 
fire, powdering them over with flour, and turn them 
a moment, in order that they may be well choked ; 
then throw in half a glass of white wine, with mush- 
rooms ready prepared, and some chopped parsley 
and shallot, pepper, and salt ; all to cook eight min- 
utes, then take off" the fire and serve instantly. 



SAVOBY DISHES. 101 

No. 165.— HASHED OALFS HEAD. 

Take half a calfs head with the skin on, thorough- 
ly clean it, and take out the brains ; then boil it 
tender in just enough water to cover it, and when 
cold cut it into any sized pieces you please, and take 
the eyes out with a sharp knife. Stew down the 
bones in the liquor in which you boil the head, and 
make of this stock a good rich gravy, to which add 
some catchup, lemon-juice, one or two jmchovies 
chopped fine, cayenne, a little port wine, and a 
bunch of sweet herbs. Wash, and boil the brains in 
a piece of linen for fifteen minutes, then beat them 
up with two eggs, two spoonfuls of flour, a little 
sage, thyme, and parsley, all chopped very fiaie, and 
season with cayenne and salt : make into little oval 
cakes, and fry in some butter or good dripping, and 
drain them on a sieve before the fire. Then make 
some forcemeat balls of fine bread crumbs, a little bit 
of boiled meat and fat bacon, an egg or two, parsley, 
thyme, lemon-peel, and an anchovy chopped; fry 
them or not, as you like; if not, boil in the gravy. 
Strain the gravy from the herbs, etc., and thicken it 
with flour, then put in the pieces of calTs head, and 
do not add the wine till shortly before it is served. 
It should also have little egg-balls and mushrooms ; 
arrange the meat nicely in the dish, and garnish with 



103 SAVOBY DISHES. 

the brain cakes and little pieces of bacon roUed and 
fried. 

No. 166.--WESTPHALIA LOAYES. 

Mix four ounces of grated ham with one pound of 
mealy potatoes, well beaten till quite light with a 
little butter, cream, and two eggs ; be careful not 
to make it too moist ; form into small loaves or 
balls, and fry in butter a light brown. Serve either 
with a brown, thick good-flavored gravy, or with- 
out, piled high on a napkin garnished with fried 
parsley. 

No. 167.— SCOTCH EGGS. 

Boil five or six pullet's eggs hard, take off the shell, 
and, without removing the white, cover completely 
with fine relishing forcenieat, in which let scraped 
ham or anchovies bear a due proportion. Fry them 
a light brown, and serve with thick rich gravy. 

No. 168.— SCOTCH COLLOPS. 

Mince as fine as possible two pounds of tender 
rump steak, put it into a stewpan with half a pint of 
water, and let it stew gently till dona While cook- 
ing, add salt and a little pepper, and keep frequently 
chopping it in the stewpan with a wedge of wood 
about five or six inches wide (which should be kept 
for the purpose), so that the meat does not form into 



SAVORY DISHES. 103 

lamps. When done it should be light and not too 
liquid ; serve with sippets of toasted bread round it 
in the dish. 



No. 169.— ROMAN PUDDINa 

Well oil a plain tin mould, sprinkle it with ver- 
imicelli, broken small, then line it with a thin paste. 
Have ready some boiled macaroni, which cut in 
pieces an inch long ; weigh it, and take the same 
weight of Parmesan cheese ; cut all the white meat 
from a boiled rabbit in little slices as thin as a sheet 
of paper, mix these with the macaroni and cheese, 
season with pepper, salt, and shallot, and add suffi- 
cient cream to moisten the whole ; then put this into 
the lined mould, cover with thin paste, and bake in a 
moderate oven for an hour. Serve with a rich brown 

sauce round it in the dish. 

* 

No. ITO.— GEOUSB PIE. 

Having picked and cleaned aa many grouse as may 
be necessary, season them with cayenne, salt, whole 
pepper, and two or three cloves pounded ; put a bit 
of butter into each bird, and lay them closely in a 
pie-dish with a little stock or good brown gravy, and 
a wine-glassful of port wine. Cover the dish with 
puff paste, and bake it an hour and a quarter ; if 
intended to be eaten cold, have ready some rich veal 



104 SAVORY DISHES. 

gravy, and pour it into the dish when it comes oat 
of the oven. 

Na Itl.— PARTRIDGE PIE. 

Proceed in the same way as for grouse pie, only 
placing ramp steak cut in smaU pieces under the 
birds. 

No. 1'72.—HARE PIE. 

Cut a hare in pieces, season it with pepper, salt, 
nutmeg, and mace, and put the whole into a covered 
jar with half a pound of butter ; tie it close, and set 
it in a deep saucepan of boiling water to cook till 
nearly done. Then make a rich forcemeat with a 
quarter of a pound of scraped bacon, two onions, a 
glass of port wine, some crumbs of bread, winter 
savory, the liver of the hare cut small, and a little 
-nutmeg ; season it well, and mix therewith the yolks 
of three eggs. Kaise the pie, and lay the forcemeat 
at the bottom of the dish ; put in the hare with the 
gravy that came from it, lay on the cover, and let the 
pie bake an hour and a half. 

No. ns.—A STANDING PIE FOR BREAKFAST. 

Put at the bottom of a stewpan a thick rump-steak 
rubbed over with shallot and well larded ; place on it 
game of any kind cut up in small pieces (no bones), 
with pepper, salt, and any seasoning you like, and a 



SAVOBY DISHES. 105 

few bits of bacon mixed in with the game ; all to be 
well stewed (with the addition of a few chopped 
mnshrooms and a little good rich gravy or savory 
jelly) before being made into a pie, which should 
have only a thin ornamental crust a quarter of an 
inch thick all round it and at the bottom ; the top 
crust to be loose ; bake the pie tUl the paste is a pale 
brown color. It should be glazed over with yolk 
of egg. 

No. It4.--ENGLISH PAT^ DE FOIB GRAS. 

Thoroughly wash some calf s liver, cut it into 
small thin slices, and wash it again, and dry it well 
in a cloth ; rub every piece with yolk of egg^ and 
season with pepper, salt, and sweet herbs. Then 
flour every layer of meat as you place it in the dish, 
putting between a few slices of very thin cut bacon 
and hard-boiled eggs; add as much good gravy as 
the dish will hold without boiling over, and fill it up 
again when taken out of the oven. Do not pack the 
meat too tight, as there should be plenty of jelly in 
the dish ; cover it with a good light paste, and bake. 
This pie is to be eaten cold. 

No. ITS.— SAUSAGE PIE. 

Take one and a half or two pounds of good pork 
sausages, which should be made a small size. Boil 
some macaroni in water till tender, drxtin it well, 



^*' 



106 SAVOBT DISHES. 

and lay in a pie-dish the sausages and macaroni 
in alternate layers, seasoning with a little finely 
chopped onion or shallot, and salt ; pour in half a pint 
or more of good-flavored stock, cover with a light 
puff paste, egg over to glaze the top, and bake in a 
moderate oven. 

No. 176.— COLONEL OOURTENAT'S PIE. 

Cover the bottom of a pie-dish with a layer of 
sliced turnips, then a layer of onions sliced, then of 
turnips again. Cut small pieces of the fat of beef, 
dip them in plenty of pepper and salt, and roll them 
up in slices of thin rump steak, four or five inches 
long and one inch and a half wide ; place these all 
round the dish till filled, then add two table-spoonfuls 
of Mogul sauce, two table-spoonfuls of mushroom 
catchup, and a quarter of a hundred of oysters with 
th^ir liquor. Cover over with a good crust, and 
bake. 

No. ITI.— GROUSE 1 LA RUSSE. 

Roast the grouse in sour creanoi, and serve them 
with preserved cranberries. 



DRESSED VEGETABLES, 107 



DEESSED VEGETABLES. 



No. ITS.— FRENCH BEANS k LA FRANgAISE. 

Cut the beahs as for boiling ; for a large-sized 
vegetable dish take an onion the size of two walnuts, 
chop it in small pieces; put three-quarters of an 
ounce of butter in a stewpan, and when melted put 
in the onion and dress thoroughly, but not to brown 
it, or the beans will be spoiled ; have ready some 
chopped parsley, which mix with pepper and salt, 
and when the onion is sufficient^ dressed, put a 
layer of the cut beans on it in the stewpan, and then 
sprinkle on some of the parsley, pepper, and salt, then 
more beans, and then more parsley, etc., alternately ; 
let them stew, and when almost done, pour in half a 
tea-cupftil of boiling broth or water, and, just before 
they are finished, add a very little thickening. If 
the beans are quite young, they will take three- 
, quarters of an hour to dress ; but if old, an hour and 
a half will not be too long to stew them. 

No. 179.— STEWED ENDIVE. 

After endive has been well picked and washed (it 
should be the broad-leaved kind), it must be slightly 



108 DBE8SED VEGETABLES. 

parboiled in four difTerent waters, to destroy the bit- 
terness peculiar to it, then boiled in salt and water 
till done, when it must be thrown into cold water, 
well squeezed, and chopped as fine as possible ; then 
put into a stewpan upon a lump of butter, with 
a few very young onions, chopped very small, 
added to it ; let it dry, then dredge it with half a 
table-spoonM of flour, and add some good gravy, 
salt, pepper, a little nutmeg, and two lumps of sugar ; 
let it stew gently for a quarter of an hour; then 
serve it up with sippets of fried bread, or under 
sweet-breads, mutton cutlets, or any dressed meat 
that you like. 

No. 180.— STEWED SPINACH. 

Having carefully picked and washed the spinach 
four or five times in plenty of water, put it into a 
very large saucepan of boiling water (so that it may 
have ample room), with some salt, pressing down the 
leaves that rise above the water. When the spinach 
is about half done, take it off the fire, strain it, and 
prepare some more boiling water and salt, in which it 
must be again boUed till sufficiently done ; the moment 
it is so, throw it into a colander, and keep pouring 
cold water over it for some time ; then make it into 
balls, and with your hands press out every drop of 
water it contains; next chop it very fine till it 
becomes almost a paste, and then put a lump of 



DRESSED VEGETABLES. 109 

1>utter into a stewpan and place the spinach upon 
the butter, let it dryi gently over the fire, and when 
the moisture is dried up, dredge it with a little flour, 
then add a small quantity of good gravy with salt, 
pepper, a little nutmeg, and a small lump of sugar ; 
let it boil up, and serve with neatly cut pieces of 
fried bread round it in the dish. 

No. 181,— SPINACH WITH CREAM. 

Proceed as in the previous receipt, and just before 
you put the spinach in the stewpan with the butter^ 
boil some good cream; when you have added the 
flour to the spinach, with a little salt, put in the 
cream, a little sugar, and nutmeg; let it simmer for 
ten minutes, then send it to table with sippets of 
fried bread round it, and a very slight sift of pow- 
dered sugar over the spinach. Serve as a* third- 
course dish. 

No. 182.— STEWED PBAa 

Shell a peck of young peas, and put them into a 
large quantity of cold water, handle them well in the 
water with b quarter of a pound of fresh butter, 
which will make the peas stick together, then drain 
them in a colander. Put half a pound of bacon or 
ham, cut in small pieces an inch long and half an inch 
wide, in the bottom of a stewpan, place upon it the 
peas from the colander, upon them put half a dozen 



110 DEESSED VEGETABLES. 

young onions, a cabbage-lettnce cut in very small 
pieces, and a bunch of parsley, which must be taken 
out before the peas are dished up : the ham or bacon 
will salt the whole sufficiently. Place tbe stewpan 
oyer a slow fire, cover it close, au^^fet its contents 
stew gently : should the water in the lettuce and the 
peas not be sufficient, half a wine-glassful may after- 
wards be added ; but when the peas are young they 
generally yield a great deal of water, so that if the 
stewing is not carried on too rapidly, any addition 
of water is seldom needed. When on taking off tJie 
lid of the stewpan you find that the lettuce has 
sunk, and is affected by the steam, let the whole be 
turned, not by a spoon, but by tossing the stewpan : 
a little pepper, and two large lumps of sugar soaked 
with water may then be thrown in, and as soon afl 
the peas are nearly ready, add some fresh cream and 
a lump of butter rolled in flour ; when the onions 
are thoroughly done, the peas will be found also 
sufficiently dressed if they are young. 

No. 183.— STEWED PEAS WITHOUT HAM OR BACON. 

Handle the peas with butter in water, as before 
directed, and drain them in a colander ; then put 
them into a stewpan with a bundle of parsley and 
green onions, and some pepper and salt ; if necessary 
add half a wine-glassful of water ; let them sweat 
over a slow fire imtil the peas are done, and add to 



BEESSED VEGETABLES. Ill 

tbem two large lumps of sugar soaked in water. 
When done, take them off the fire, and as soon as 
they are sufficiently off the boil, stir in the yolk of 
an eggy previously beaten up with a table-spoonful of 
cold water, and serre. 

No. 184.-^TEWED RED CABBAGE. 

Slice a middlingnsized red cabbage, cut it, and put 
it into a stewpan with an onion sliced, pepper, salt, 
and half a pint of gravy ; let it stew two hours, then 
put in a bit of butter mixed with a little flour, shake 
all well together, let it boil, and serve it quite hot. 

No. 185.-.BROCCOLI SPROUTS A L'lTALIENNE. 

Having boiled the sprouts in salt and water, let 
them cool, and when cold, dredge them with flour ; 
fry them rather brown in butter, sprinkle a little 
salt over them, and serve. 

No. 186.— CAULIFLOWER WITH PARMESAN CHEESE. 

Having boiled a fine cauliflower, prepare a sauce 
in the following manner : — ^into a quarter of a pound 
of butter rub a table-spoonful of flour, then put it 
into a stewpau, and as the butter melts, add by 
degrees half a pint of water, or a little more if you 
require more sauce ; stir the whole till it boils, and 
after it has boiled a couple of minutes, take it from 
the fire, and when entirely off the boil, add the yolk 



112 DEES8ED VEGETABLES. 

of an egg beaten up with a little lemon-joice and a 
dessert-spoonfiil of soft water; shake the steivpan 
till the whole is well mixed and the sauce set. Now 
powder the cauliflower rather thickly with rasped 
cheese, then pour the sauce over it, and when the 
sauce is firmly set upon it, cover the surface ijrith 
more rasped cheese, and then bread crumbs, and 
brown it with a salamander. Serve very hot, as a 
third-course dish. 

No. 18Y.— MASHED PARSNIPS. 

Cut up the parsnips if very large, boil them, mash 
them, and press them through a coarse sieve ; then 
put them into a stewpan with a little cream, pepper, 
and salt ; stir them over the fire till quite hot, and 
then serve. If you have no cream, use instead a 
little milk, and a small piece of butter with a slight 
dredge of flour. 

No. 188.— MASHED VEGETABLE-MARROW. 

When vegetable-marrows are getting rather old, 
and too large to serve plain boiled with white sauce, 
they are very good boiled and then mashed, drain- 
ing them very thoroughly from the water which 
runs from them in mashing; put this mashed vege- 
table-marrow into a stewpan with a bit of butter, 
pepper, and salt, stir it over the fire till quite hot, 
and then serve it upon a rather thick slice of toast. 



BBESSED VEOETABLES. 118 

which yon have just dipped into boiliDg water and 
then slightly battered and sprinkled with salt. 

No. 189.— CARROTS WITH PARSLEY. 

Boil the carrots, and cut them in slices rather 
thicker than a penny piece ; if they are very large, 
halve them or quarter them down the length, accord- 
ing to size, before slicing them. Take some sprigs 
of parsley, parboil them, and chop them small ; then 
pnt the sliced carrots into a stewpan with the chop- 
ped parsley, a good bit of butter^ a piece of glaze if 
yoa have it, and some pepper and salt ; toss them 
over the fire till hot, and serve. 

No. 190.— SALSDT OR SCORZONERA IN BROWN 

SAUCE. 

Wash the roots, and scrape the skin gently off 
them ; cut them into lengths of three or four inches, 
put them into boiling water with a little salt, a small 
bit of butter, and the juice of a lemon ; boil them for 
an hour, then drain, and serve with a rich brown 
sauce over them ; or, for a change, you may send 
them up with white sauce instead of the brown. 

No. 191.— SALSIFY OR SCORZONERA IN BATTER, 

Proceed as in the previous receipt, and when yon 

have well drained them, dredge them slightly with 

flour to dry them; then dip each piece into a light 
8 • 



I 



114 DBESSED VEGETABLES. 

batter, fry tbem a nice light brown, drain well from 
the fat, dish them on a napkin, and serve imme- 
diately. 

No. 192.— HOW TO BOIL OLD POTATOES. 

Late in the season, when the potatoes are not very 
good, they should be pared and put to soak in cold 
water from foar to six hours, then dropped into 
hoUing water (an essential point), and a little salt 
added to the water; take them from the fire the 
moment they are done, pour off all the water, and 
let them stand uncovered in the saucepan over the 
fire, till the water from the surface has all passed 
off in steam, and then the potatoes are ready, and 
should be sent to table immediately. 

No. 193.— NEW POTATOES AU BEURRB. 

Choose the potatoes as nearly of the same size as 
possible, wash them, and rub off the outer skin, then 
wipe them dry. Put a quarter of a pound of fresh 
butter into a stewpan, set it on the fire, and when it 
boils throw in the potatoes; let them boil in the 
butter tiU they are done, taking care to toss them 
every now and then, so that they may all go succes- 
sively into the boiling butter ; they must be care- 
ftilly watched, because if too much done they shrivel 
up and become waxy: when the fork shows that 
they are done, they must be taken out before they 



DRESSED VEGETABLES. 115 

lose their crispness, put into a dish, and some salt 
sprinkled over them. As soon as they are taken out 
of the boiling batter, throw in a handfnl of parsley, 
and after it has had a boil or two, lay it round the 
potatoes in the dish as a garnish. They must be 
served immediately, » they are epofled by getting 
cold. The butter in which the potatoes were boiled 
may be poured into a jar, and serve again for the 
same purpose. 

No. 194.— POTATOES 1 LA MAITRB D'HOTBL. 

Boil potatoes, and let them become cold, then cut 
them into rat];ier thick slices, put a lump of butter in 
a stewpan, and add a little flonr dredged on it, about 
a tea-spoonftil for a middling-sized dish ; when the 
flour has boiled a little while in the butter, add by 
degrees a tea-cupful of broth or water, and when 
this has boiled up, put in the potatoes with chopped 
parsley, pepper, and salt ; let- the potatoes stew for a 
few minutes, then take them from the fire, and when 
quite off the boil, add the yolk of an egg beaten up 
with a little lemon-juice and a table-spoonful of cold 
water. As soon as the sauce has set the potatoes 
may be served. 

No. 195.— POTATOES k LA CBBMB. 

Put a piece of butter roUed in flour in a stewpan, 
with some salt, coarse pepper, and a little grated 



r 



116 DKBSSED YEaETABLES. 

nutmeg; mix them well together, adding a large 
wine-glassfal of cream, then place the sance on the 
fire, and stir it round till it boils. Have ready some 
boiled potatoes cat in slices, put them into the sauce, 
and after warming them up, serve quite hot. "Fon 
may add to the sauce, if you like it, some green 
onions and a little chopped parsley. 

No. 196.— POTATO CHIPS. 

Wash and pare off the skins of two or three or 
more large potatoes, and when you have done this, 
go on paring them, cutting them as thin and as 
evenly as possible in ribbons nearly sff. inch wide ; 
throw these into boiling fat, let them take a nice 
light color, drain them well before the fire, and 
serve immediately (or they lose their crispness), piled 
high on a napkin. They may be sent in with game 
in the third course. 

No. 197.— POTATOES A LA RUSSK 

Cut up the potatoes in small pieces, and fry them 
in olive-oil with some mushrooms minced smalL 

No. 198.— BEET-ROOT SALAD. 

Boil one or two large onions till soft and perfectly 
mild; when cold, pulp them through a sieve, and 
mix the onion with sliced beet-root and celery, adding 
salt, pepper, oil, and vinegar — ^the oil being in the 



DRESSED VEGETABLES. 117 

proportion of three table-spooDfuls to one of vine- 
gar, unless the vinegar should be very weak, when 
you must add more. The onion and beet-root are 
very good without celery : the beet-root should be 
baked in the oven, which process retains more 
flavor in it than boiling. 

No. 199.— TOMATO SAL AT). 

Cut some tomatoes which are ripe without being 
too soft in slices the thickness of a penny piece ; 
sprinkle over them a small quantity of very finely 
chopped chives or green onions^ add salt, pepper, 
on, and vinegar, and serve with any roast meats. 

No. 200.— HARICOT BEAN SALAD. 

Boil some small white haricot beans in water till 
quite tender, drain them well, and let them get 
quite cold. Chop up some tarragon, chervil, parsley, 
and a little shallot together, all as small as possible. 
Put the cold haricot beans in a dish, sprinkle the 
chopped herbs over them, add salt, pepper oil, and 
vinegar, mix all well together, and serve. 

No. 201.— CAULIFLOWER SALAD. 

Boil a cauliflower till about two-thirds done 4 let it 
get cold, then break it in branches, lay them neatly 
in a dish, adding salt, pepper, oil, and vinegar, and 
serve. 



118 DBESSED VEGETABLES. 

No. 202^POTATO SALAD. 

Cold boiled potatoes make a veiy good salad, cnt- 
ting them in slices a quarter of an inch thick, or 
rather less ; lay them in a dish, sprinkle over them a 
little finely chopped parsley and chervil, adding salt, 
pepper, oil, and either plain or tarragon vinegar. 
For all these salads, the proportions of oil and vine- 
gar are the same as those given for beet-root salad. 



SAVORY behoy:es. 119 



SAVOET KEMOYES. 



No. 203.— SCOTCH WOOPCOCK. 

Take two slices of toasted bread, rather thick, and 
butter them on both sides ; then wash and scrape 
four or five fresh anchovies, and chop them fine and 
put them between the toast, and with a sharp knife 
cut through the two slices, dividing them into four 
or six pieces, according to the size of the slice ; then 
take the yolks of two eggs, well beaten, and a quar- 
ter of a pint of cream, which set over the fire to 
thicken, but not boil, or it will curdle ; pour this 
custard over the toast, and send to table as hot as 
possible. 

No. 204.— FONDUE. 

Take two ounces of butter, two ounces of flour, 
six ounces of Parmesan cheese grated, five eggs, and 
nearly a pint of milk, and flavor with pepper, salt, 
and a very little mustard. Mix the flour smoothly 
with a little cold milk, and then add the boiling milk 
to it gradually, stirring all the time ; next put in the 
butter, cheese, pepper, salt, and mustard, and set 



i 



120 SAVOBY BEHOVES. 

the mixture aside to cool ; when cold, beat the yolks 
of the eggs and stir in, and lastly whip the whites to 
a stiff froth and whisk into the other ingredients ; 
poor into year mould, and bake in a quick oven 
from half to three quarters of an hour ; as soon as 
it is quite risen in the oven, and looks set, it is done 
sufficiently, and must be served immediately or it 
wiUM. 

No. 205.— CHEESE BALLa 

Take four eggs and the weight of them in bread 
crumbs, butter, and cheese ; beat them togetiier in 
a mortar, leaving out the whites of two eggs, season 
with cayenne and salt, make them up into little 
round balls, egg and bread-crumb them, and fry 
them in lard. They must be put into the fet before 
it boils, or they will be too brown ; serve piled high 
in the dish on a napkin. 

No. 206.— GERMAN CHEESE 

Take one ounce of cheese pounded and one ounce 
of flour, mix well, adding a little cream or milk to it, 
and season with cayenne and a very little garlic or 
shallot ; roll the paste thin, cut it in strips, bake in a 
very quick oven, and serve immediately. 



SAVORY REMOVES. 121 

No. 20t.--OHEESB OMELET. 

Take two ounces of grated cheese, one egg^ three 
table-spoonfuls of cream, and beat them well together ; 
butter your omelet mould or a deep plate, and bake 
in a quick oven, and serve immediately. 

No. 208.— FRENCH STEWED CHEESE. 

Grate three ounces of cheese and put into a basin, 
mix with it a small tea-cupful of cream and an egg 
well beaten and strained ; put into a small stewpan 
an ounce of butter, let it melt, then stir in the other 
ingredients with a little pepper and salt, and keep it 
on the fire, stirring it all the time till the whole is 
well mixed, and then serve quite hot on a buttered 
toast. 

No. 209.— BUTTERED EGGS. 

Gut a slice of bread about half an inch thick, toast 
and butter it on both sides, cut off the crust and then 
cut it into four, and put it into a small dish to keep 
hot before the fire ; melt a piece of butter in a stew- 
pan over the fire, and drop in three fresh eggs, yolks 
and whites, a little salt, and a table-spoonful of 
cream or good milk ; stir it quickly on the fire till it 
begins to thicken, then take it off and stir and pound 
it quite smooth, then set it on again and make it very 
hot (it ought now to be thick) ; take up your toast 



122 SAVOBr BEMOVES. 

from the fire, and with a spoon heap the egg on the 
toast as lightly and as high as possible; garnish, if 
yoa please, with fillets of anchovies well washed and 
scraped, and serve very hot. 



No. 210.— HAM OR TONGUE TOAST. 

Cut a slice of bread rather thick, toast it and 
batter it well on both sides. Take a small quantity 
of the remains of either ham or tongue and grate it • 
have ready, chopped fine, two hard-boiled eggs, pat 
both meat and eggs into a stewpan with a little 
batter, salt, and cayenne, and make it quite hot, then 
spread thickly on the battered toast, and serve im- 
mediately. 



No. 211.— MACARONL 

Boil a full quarter of a pound of macaroni in 
water till tender, for twenty minutes. Thicken half 
a pint of milk with a little flour and a piece of butter 
the size of a walnut, two table-spoonfuls of cream, a 
very small tea-spoonful of mustard, white pepper, salt 
and cayenne to taste, and a quarter of a pound of 
Parmesan cheese grated very fine ; stir all together, 
and boil for ten minutes ; pour it over the macaroni, 
which must be drained from the water, and boil the 
whole five minutes, and serve. 



SAVORY REMOVES. 123 

No. 212.— MACARONI 1 L'lTALIBNNE. 

Boil some macaroni tender in broth, strain it, and 
then put it into a dry saucepan with a piece of fresh 
butter (in the proportion of four ounces of butter to 
one pound of macaroni), stir it, but do not put it on 
the fire, as the butter will melt of itself in the hot 
macaroni. Have ready some rich gravy made with 
veal and flavored with onion and other savory herbs ; 
keep the macaroni quite hot, pour the gravy on it 
just before it is served, and when in the dish grate 
Parmesan cheese over the whole, and salamander or 
not as you please. 

No. 213.— MACARONI WITH TOMATO SAUCE. 

Boil six ounces of macaroni in water till tender, 
then strain it, and put it into a dry stewpan with two 
ounces of butter and four ounces of Parmesan cheese 
grated fine, and keep this hot by the fire, mixing all 
well together. Make a sauce of half a pint of good- 
flavored stock, thicken it with a little arrow-root, and 
flavor it very strongly with tomato sauce ; heap up 
the macaroni in a dish, pour the sauce over it, and 
serve very hot. 

No. 214.— LOBSTER SALAD. 

Prepare a border of hard-boiled eggs round the 
dish as directed in No. 86, and place inside it a 



124 8AVOBY BEHOVES. 

layer of fresh and rather finely shred salad. Pick 
the meat from a large hen lobster, and cut it into 
rather smaU pieces; then pound smooth the hard- 
boiled yolks of two eggs and a small piece of shallot, 
and mix with the yolk of a raw egg ; stir in, a few 
drops at a time, six table-spoonfnls of salad oil and 
two of tarragon vinegar, salt and pepper to taste^ 
with a pinch of pounded sugar, the soft inside of the 
lobster and the coral dried and pounded; mix all 
these thoroughly into a thick creamy sauce, and pass 
it through a sieve that it may be quite smooth. Put 
the pieces of lobster on the salad, keeping it even, 
but higher in the middle than at the edges, pour the 
sauce over (taking care that it does not run over the 
border of eggs), and garnish the centre in a pattern 
with fiUets of anchovies weU washed and scraped, 
olives, and capers. 



SAUOES. 125 



SAUCES. 



No. 215.— BREAD SAUOB. 

SucB some white bread very thin, and without 
cmst-, boil it in milk with a sliced onion and some 
whole white pepper; rub through a coarse sieve, 
return it to the stewpan, put in a small piece of 
butter, salt to taste, and a little cream if jou have 
it, to make it of a proper thickness ; warm sufficient- 
ly, and serve. 

No. 216.— HORSE-RADISH SAUCE. 

Take a tea-spoonful of mustard, and also of vinegar, 
three table-spoonfuls of thick cream, a very small 
quantity of shallot, a little salt, and grate as much 
horse-radish into it as will make it as thick as onion 
sauce. 

No. 21'7.— OYSTER SAUOB. 

Boil the oysters in their own liquor till they are 
quite tender, and then beard them ; mix in a plate 
some butter with flour, and put into the liquor 
strained ; when it is hot, stir the oysters into it, and 
add melted butter and a little cayenne pepper ; give 



126 SAUCES. 

one boil, and the last thing add a squeeze of lemon, 
and serve. 



No. 218.— LOBSTER SAUCE. 

Pick a lobster well, and cut the meat into small 
pieces ; beat the spawn with a little cold butter in a 
marble mortar, mix with the pieces of lobster, and 
stir them into melted butter over the fire, and give 
the sauce one boil. A little cream is an improve- 
ment, and the sauce should be made the last thing 
before sending to table, as it is apt to separate. 

No. 219.— DUTCH SAUCE. 

Take three table-spoonfuls of vinegar, three table- 
spoonMs of water, one or two onions, a little mace, 
and a small quantity of anchovy sauce; simmer all 
over the fire till much reduced, and then add half a 
tea-cupful of good cream and the yolks of two eggs. 
This is a very good sauce for boiled fish. 

No. 220.— CREAM SAUCE. 

Take two ounces of butter, the yolks of two eggs, 
a little lemon-juice, pepper, and salt, and melt over 
the fire in a small stewpan ; have ready half a pint of 
melted butter, stir it in, and serve the sauce with any 
boiled fish. 



SAUCES. 127 

No. 221.— WHITE SAUCE. 

Take half a pint of cream or good milk, a quarter 
of a pint of light-colored stock, flavor with mace or 
mushroom, a little salt, and thicken sufficiently over 
the fire with a little flour and butter, and give it a 
good boil. 

No. 222.— BROWN ONION SAUCE. 

Slice some onions, and brown them in a stewpan 
in a little butter, then add a little good gravy or 
stock, and stew them till tender. This is an excel- 
lent saxLce with rump steak. 



128 PXIDDINOS. 



PXJDDrNTGS, 



No. 223.— RAVENSWORTH PUDDIXa. 

Bake three large apples, and then pulp them ; take 
one pmt of cream, two haodfuls of fine bread cmmbs, 
half a pound of pounded loaf sugar, the grated rind 
of two lemons, and six eggs, using only the 74Uks> 
of four; mix all well together, beating the eggs 
thoroughly, the yolks first, and then the whites. 
Well butter a pudding mould, throw in a handfiil of 
fine bread crumbs, toss them round so that they may 
stick to the butter all round the mould, and shake 
out any that are loose, then pour in the above mix- 
ture, and bake an hour and a half. Serve, imme- 
diately it is ready, with sweet sauce. 

No. 224.— ST. LEONARDOS CUSTARD PUDDING. 

Put one table-spoonful of flour into a st^wpan with 
two ounces of butter, and stir over a gentle fire till 
quite smooth, adding by degrees half a pint of milk 
and two ounces of sugar rubbed on lemon ; stir all 
together over the fire till it becomes thick, but do 
not let it boil ; turn into a basin, and when nearly 



PUDDINGS. 129 

cold, add the yolks of three eggs. Line your dish 
with poff paste, then spread a layer of any kind of 
jam on the paste at the bottom of the dish, pour the 
castard on the jam, and bake one hour. Whip the 
■vrhites of the three eggs quite stiff, with two table- 
spoonfuls of powdered sugar, and put on the top ten 
minutes before you send to table; the pudding 
should be returned to the oven after the whipped 
eggs are placed on the top, just to set them, and give 
the top a slight brown color. 

No. 225.— HANOVER PUDDING. 

Orate finely the crumb of a roll, and mince as fine 
as possible the rind of a lemon, add a quarter of a 
pound of fine sugar and of fresh butter, the juice of 
half a lemon, and the yolks of four eggs well beaten, 
and the whites of two. Set the whole on the fire in 
a stewpan, and stir till sufficiently thick ; then line a 
flattish dish with puff paste at the bottom and edges^ 
pour in the mixture, and bake it in a moderate oven 
for half an hour. 

No. 226.— AMBER PUDDING. 

Mix together half a pound of finely chopped suet, 

half a pound of bread crumbs, half a pound of sugar, 

a little candied peel, spice, and lemon-peel, four eggs, 

and a pot of orange marmalade or apricot jam ; boil 

in a mould for three hours. For the sauce, take a 




130 PUDDINGS* 

quarter of a pound of butter, two ounces of sifted 
sugar, twelve bitter almonds pounded, and a wine- 
glass of brandy ; beat all up to a stiff cream near the 
fire, and put round the padding in the dish when 
served, but not a minute before, or the heat of the 
pudding will oil the butter. 

No. 227.— ROYAL PUDDING. 

Butter a plain, tinned mould, and pour in the cen- 
tre of it one table-spoonful of white sugar melted 
like hard-bake, and let it set. Then boil a pint of 
cream with a piece of vanille, and sugar to taste, 
and when cool strain the cream to the yolks of eight 
eggs well beaten : mix thoroughly, and pour into the 
mould upon the hardened sugar, and set it in a stew- 
pan of boiling water to boil gently for half an hour. 
When cold, turn it out of the mould, and it will be 
found that the melted sugar will have colored the 
outside of the pudding, and also formed a liquid 
brown sauce for it. 

No. 228.— CANADIAN PUDDING. 

Take three table-spooniuls of Indian meal to one 
pint of milk, and let it simmer for three hours, stir- 
ring frequently ; turn it into a basin and let it stand 
till nearly cold, when add three well-beaten eggs 
and a little sugar, and stir all well together. Butter 
and garnish a plain mould with sultanas, or dried 



PUDDINGS. 131 

cherries, candied peels, etc., fill it with the Indian 
meal, and let it steam for an hour and a half. For 
the sauce, take a quarter of a pound of butter beaten 
to cream, three ounces of finely sifted sugar, one 
table-spoonful of powdered cinnamon, and a wine- 
glassful of brandy ; beat all well together, and serve 
in a sauce tureen immediately it is mixed, or it will 
become stiff. Should any be left to use the second 
day, it must be beaten up to a cream again. 

No. 229.— MADEIRA PUDDING. 

Take six ounces of butter beaten to a cream, six 
ounces of pounded lamp sugar, six ounces of flour 
(or three ounces of flour and three of ground rice), 
six ounces weight of eggs in the shell — ^the yolks and 
whites to be beaten separately and then together — 
a small wine-glassful of brandy, and a little grated 
marmalade, or any thing else you please to flavor it ; 
beat all well together^ put it into a buttered mould, 
boil two hours, and serve with wine sauce. 

No. 230.— TREACLE PUDDING. 

Take a quarter of a pound of very finely chopped 
suet, six ounces of dark treacle, a quarter of a pound 
of flour, two ounces of fije bread crumbs, one table- 
spoonful of moist sugar, one egg^ and three table- 
spoonfuls of milk ; beat the egg well, then mix it 
with the milk, and afterwards with the other ingre- 



132 PUDMKGS. 

dients, and put into albnttered mould and boil three 
hours. To be served with sweet sauce. 

No. 231.— POTATO PUDDING. 

Take one pound of potatoes, boiled, and beaten 
with a fork, a quarter of a pound of suet^ chopped very 
fine, a quarter of a pound of moist sugar, the juice 
and rind of a lemon grated, and one egg well beaten ; 
mix thoroughly, and bake half an hour in an oven, 
not too quick. Serve with sweet sauce. 

No. 232.— BOILED BREAD PUDDING. 

Cut some white bread into thin slices, and put a 
layer of bread and a layer of preserve alternately 
in a buttered mould till it is nearly full ; pour over 
all a pint of warm milk in which four well beaten 
eggs have been thoroughly mixed, and boil twenty 
minutes. Serve with wine sauce. 

No. 233.— A TWENTY MINUTES' PUDDING. 

Boil one pint of new milk twenty minutes, with 
sugar to taste, and any flavoring you like; beat 
four eggs well, and mix with the milk when nearly 
cold. Boil all in a buttered mould for twenty min- 
utes, iind then let it stand twenty minutes, after 
being taken up, in the mould on the hob or oven 
before sending to table. For the sauce, boil the 
thinly cut peel of a lemon in a little water till the 



puDDHirGS. 133 

flavor is extracted, rub some lumps of sugar on the 
lemon, to take off all the zest, and add to the water 
in which you have boiled the lemon-peel, and make 
a thin syrup ; add the juice of the lemon, pour round 
the pudding, and serve. 

No. 234.— BAKEWELL PUDDINO. 

/Take a quarter of a pound of clarified butter, a 
quarter of a pound of powdered sugar, five yolks 
and one white of egg, and mix all well together, then 
add some almond flavoring to your taste. Line a 
dish or several small patty-pans ^th puff paste, put 
a layer of raspberry or strawberry preserve on it, 
then put in the mixture ; it requires to be well soaked 
in the oven before taking it out, but is generally 
eaten between hot and cold. Grate sugar on the top 
before sending to table. 

• No. 235.— SCARBOROUGH PUDDING. 

If the apples are large sized, take one e^^^ to an 
apple. Scald and pulp the apples, then slice in half 
an ounce of butter, add the eggs well beaten, a little 
cream, candied lemon-peel, and sugar, and two table- 
spoonfuls of brandy. Bake in a thin paste in a mod- 
erate oven. 



134 PUDDINGS. 

No. 236.— DEVON PUDDING. 

Thicken a pint of new milk with a large table- 
spoonful of arrow-root ; beat four ounces of butter 
to a cream, and add four ounces of sifted sugar, four 
eggs, a spoonful of marmalade, and a little grated 
nutmeg ; beat all together, the same as for a pound 
cake, and when quite light, put in a sponge cake 
crumbled, and mix with the milk and arrow-root, 
and when nearly cold bake in a dish lined with thin 
paste. 

No. 237.— A COLD CABINET PUDDING. 

Have ready some blanc-mange, and before it is 
stiff put a little of it into a mould, and let it run all 
over it to stick to it ; then ornament the mould with 
dried cherries and sufficient of the blanc-mange to 
make them firm, then fill up the mould with pieces 
of preserved apricots, a few ratifias soaked in brandy, 
or wine and brandy, a little citron, cut very thin, and 
sponge biscuits crumbled — ^but do not wet them too 
much with the brandy — and so on with cherries, or 
any other firm sweets, cakes, etc., till your mould is 
full ; then fill up with the cold liquid blanc-mange, 
so as to cover all over, and let it stand all night in 
a cold place to set well. The cherries must be ar- 
ranged to look well when turned out, but you need 
be careful about nothing else of the sweets, etc. 



PUDDINGS. 185 

No. 238.— -THE BERKELEY PUDDINa. 

Take one pound of suet, chopped very fine, four 
ounces of flour, half an ounce of fine bread crumbs, 
three whole eggs, half a small tea-spoonful of pounded 
mace, the same of cinnamon, a little grated nutmeg, 
a little grated lemon-peel, and half a pint of milk ; 
mix all together, put into a plain mould, and boil 
nine hours. For the sauce, make a custard with the 
yolks of two eggs, white sugar to taste, and a wine- 
glassful of rum. 

No. 239— YORKSHIRE PUDDING. 

Take two heaped-up spoonfuls of flour, and mix 
very smoothly with a pint of milk and a little salt; 
have rfiady, in your pudding-dish, dripping spread a 
quarter of an inch in thickness, and allowed to get 
cold ; then beat up well two eggs, and mix with the 
milk and flour, pour it immediately on to the drip- 
ping, and put the pudding-dish into the oven for half 
an hour, then put it under the meat for ten minutes, 
then again into the oven for ten minutes, and serve 
at once. 

No. 240.— PRINCESS AMELIA'S PUDDINGS. 

Take ^ve large apples and prepare them as for 
sauce, and add, while hot, two ounces of butter, and 
when cold, two eggs thoroughly beaten, some bread 



/ 



136 PUDDrNGS. 

crambs, a little cream, nutmeg, and sugar to taste; 
mix all together, and bake in little cups ; turn them 
out-, sift sugar over them, and serve. 

No. 241.— nONITON SPONGE PUDDING. 

Take three eggs, their weight in the shell in flour, 
butter, and sugar, and grate the rind of a lemon very 
fine ; beat the butter to a cream, and the eggs, yolks 
and whites separately, and then together ; add the 
butter, and keep on beating; then mix in the sugar, 
and lastly the flour ; then beat the whole till quite 
light. Put into a mould, and boil an hour and a 
half. Serve with any fruit sauce, or with lemon 
sauce, as given in No. 233. 

No. 242.— KHALI KHAN'S PUDDING. 

Boil one ounce of rice in new milk till it will beat 
to a pulp ; pare, core, and scald six apples, and beat 
them also with the rice, an ounce of finely sifted 
sugar, a salt*spoonful of grated lemon-peel, and a 
little lemon-juice; then beat the white of four eggs 
till they make a stifi* froth, add the other ingredients, 
whisking them well together, so as to be very light. 
Dip a basin mould in boiling water, and while the 
mould is quite hot, pour in this souffle, and place 
the mould in a stewpan of boiling water on the oven 
or hot plate, till the white of the egg is set and quite 
firm. Make a custard with the yolks of the four 



PUDDINGS. 137 

eggs, flavor it well, and pour it hot round the pud- 
ding in the dish, and serve. You must be careful 
not to break the pudding in turning it out of the 
moald. 

No. 243.— EXHIBITION PUDDING. 

Take half a pound of suet, chop very fine, a quar- 
ter of a pound of raisins, stoned, two table-spoonfuls 
of flour, two table-spoonfuls of sugar, the peel of a 
whole lemon grated, a little nutmeg, and three eggs ; 
mix all together, put into a mould and boil for four 
hours. Serve wtih wine sauce. 

No. 244.— SIR WATKIN WINN'S PUDDING. 

Take half a pound of suet, half a pound of loaf 
sugar, three ounces of orange marmalade, and half a 
pound of bread crumbs, and mii* all together with 
three eggs and some wine or brandy. Butter and 
ornament a mould with raisins, put in the ingredients, 
and boil for two hours and a quarter. Serve with 
lemon or wine sauce. 

No. 245.— FRENCH RICE PUDDING. 

Weigh a quarter of a pound of rice and put it into 
a pint of milk, let it simmer till soft and all the milk 
is soaked up ; when n9arly cold, add one ounce of 
butter, the yolks and whites of three eggs, a little 
loaf sugar, and the rind of a lemon grated, and mix 



138 PUDDINGS. 

all well together. Butter a plain mould, and grate 
crust of bread thickly over the butter, then put in the 
rice, bake one hour, turn it out of the mould, and 
serve. 



No. 246.— WOLLATQN PUDDING. 

Boil a pint of new milk, and pour it upon two 
table-spoonfuls of flour ; let it stand till cold, thea 
add two eggs weU beaten, sweeten with two table- 
spoonfuls of treacle, and bake. Serve immediately 
it comes from the oven. 



No. 247.— SOUFFLE PUDDING. 

Take one ounce of Jautter, mix: with a good table- 
spoonful of flour, and let it boil five minutes ; have 
ready three-quarters of a pint of boiling milk, flavored 
with the rind of a lenion and a little cinnamon ; mix 
all together and boil ten minutes, then break in one 
whole egg, and the yolks of three, separately, mix 
well together, then whip the three whites of the eggs 
to a strong froth, and stir in gently, adding a few 
drops of vanille, or any essence you like, to flavor it. 
Well butter your mould, strew it with brown bread 
crumbs, pour in the mixture, and steam it half an 
hour. Serve immediately with a sweet sauce made 
with arrow-root and milk flavored. 



PUDDINGS. 139 

No. 248.— STRAWBERRY SOUFPL^. 

Take a large table-spoonful of flour and a quarter 
of a pound of butter, and simmer them over a slow 
fire ; mix together half a pint of milk and a pot of 
strawberry jam, and let them boil ; then rub them 
through a sieve, and add them to the flour and but- 
ter, with a little sugar to sweeten if needed ; put in 
the yolks of five eggs, beat up the whites of the eggs 
to snow, and stir them gently into the other ingre- 
dients; put into a plain mould, and boil an hour. 
Servo it with wine sauce in which you have put a 
little of the strawberry jam rubbed through a sieve. 
Raspberry jam may also be used for this 8ouffl6 in- 
stead ef strawberry. 

No. 249.— ORANGE PUDDING. 

Line a pudding-dish with a flour and water paste, 
ornamenting the edge also. Take one tea-cupful of 
bread crumbs, six oranges — the peel of them to be 
pared very thin, boiled, |)ounded,* and then rubbed 
through a sieve, and the juice of the six oranges to 
be added to the bread crumbs, — six ounces of finely 
pounded sugar, and the yolks of four eggs ; the 
whites to be beaten to a stiff froth, and mixed with 
the rest of the ingredients the last thing before 
putting in the oven. Bake three-quarters of an 
hour in a moderate oven. 



140 PUDDINGS. 

No. 250.— LEMON PUDDINa. 

Take the jaice of three lemons and the peel of one 
rubbed off with sugar, six ouuces of loaf sugar 
pounded, and a good-sized tea-cupful of bread 
crumbs ; while these ingredients are soaking to- 
gether, beat up four eggs, leaving out two whites ; 
melt one ounce of butter, and mix all well together. 
Line a dish with flour and water paste, ornamenting 
the edge ; pour in the mixture, and bake three-quar- 
ters of an hour in a quick oven. 

No. 251.— CHRISTMAS PUDDING. 

Take one pound and a half of raisins, stoned, one 
pound and a half of currants, well washed and dried, 
one pound and a half of very finely chopped suet, 
a quarter of a pound of sugar, two ounces of citron, 
four large wooden spoonfuls of dried flour, four or 
five eggs, half a pint of milk, spice to your taste, 
and a glass of brandy ; mix all together, and boil 
eight hours in a mould or basin, and serve with 
sweet sauce. 

No. 252.— RICH PLUM PUDDING. 

Take one pound of jar raisins, one pound of cur- 
rants, one pound of suet, chopped very fine, two 
ounces of almonds, blanched and pounded, and mixed 
in one pound of dried and sifted flour, one pound of 



PUDPIKGS. 141 

^ated bread crumbs, two ounces of citron, two 
ounces of orange-peel, two ounces of lemon-peel, 
half a nutmeg, a blade or two of mace pounded, a 
quarter of a pound of loaf sugar, and a pinch of 
salt ; moisten the whole with ten beaten eggs, half a 
pint of cream, two glasses of wine, and a gill of 
brandy. Mix well together, put into a mould, and 
boil five hours ; serve with sweet sauce. This quan- 
tity makes a large pudding. 

No. 253.-.BAKED COLLEGE PUDDINGS. 

Take half a pound of grated bread, three ounces 
of well washed currants, one ounce of candied peels, 
half an ounce of citron, two ounces of moist sugar, 
half a nutmeg, three eggs^ and the third part of a 
pint of milk ; boil the milk and pour on the bread 
crumbs, put in an ounce of butter, and then mix in 
the other ingredients. This quantity will fill six 
cups ; bake in a moderate oven, turn the puddings 
out of the cups, sift pounded sugar over the tops, 
pour wine sauce round them, and serve. 

No. 264.— LEMON PUDDINGS. 

Take a quarter of a pound of suet, chopped as 
fine as possible, half a pound of grated bread, a 
quarter of a pound of moist sugar, the juice and 
finely grated rind of one lemon, and one egg ; mix 
all weU together, fill four cups, and boil half an hour ; 



142 PUDDINGS. 

Bifb ponnded sugar over tbem, and serve with lemon 
sauce. 

No. 255.— BOILED RICE PUDDINGS. 

Boil a quarter of a pound of ground rice in a pint 
of milk and a little cream, and when almost cold add 
a quarter of a pound of butter, three eggs well 
beaten, loaf sugar to taste, and a few drops of 
Tanille ; mix all together, pour into little cups, and 
boil half an hour. Serve with sweet sauce. 

No. 256.— BUCKINGHAMSHIRE PUDDING. 

Take a pint of cream, the rind of a lemon, and a 
bit of mace, sugar to taste, and boil together ; then 
take out the lemon-peel, beat it in a mortar, pass it 
through a sieve, and put it back again to the cream ; 
let it stand till nearly cold, then pour it gently to 
the yolks of six eggs, and when mixed well together 
put it into a mould, place the mould in a saucepan 
of boiling water, cover it with a lid, and set it on a 
slow fire or stove to boil gently half an hour ; turn 
it out of the mould while warm, and when it is cold 
pour melted currant or raspberry jelly over it, and 
serve. 

No. 257.— PEAS PUDDING. 

Put a pint of split peas into a cloth, do not tie it 
up too tight, but leave room for the peas to swell; 



PUDDINGS. 143 

boil Blowly till tender — ^if good peas, they will be 
boiled enough in three hours ; take them up and rub 
through a hair sieve, beat the pulp in a basin with an 
eggy an ounce of butter or a little cream, pepper, 
and salt, and when the whole is well mixed, tie it up 
in the cloth again, and boil half an hour longer. 

No. 258.— CASTLE PUDDINGS. 

Take two eggs in the shells, and the weight of 
them in sugar, and also in flour, and three ounces of 
butter ; put the butter into a basin and set it before 
the fire till half melted, then beat it to a cream, 
beat the eggs ten minutes, mix them gently with the 
butter, then with the sugar, then with the flour; 
add a pinch of pounded cinnamon and a table-spoon- 
ful of orange-flower water, and mix thoroughly. 
Pour the mixture into six small buttered cups, bake 
them, and then turn them out of the cups, and serve 
with sweet sauce. 

No. 259.— APRICOT PUDDING. 

Stew six large apricots with some sugar till quite 
tender, break them up, and when cold add the yolks 
of six eggs and the whites of two well beaten ; mix 
well together with a pint of good cream, and also 
more pounded sugar if required. Line your dish 
with pufif paste, and pour in the ingredients ; bake 



144 PUDDINGS. 



half an hoar in a moderate oven, strew sifted sngar 
over it, and serve. 



Na 260.— CITRON PUDDINa. 

Line your dish with puff paste ; slice thin, orange 
lemon, and citron peels, of each one ounce, six eggs 
(leaving out four whites) well beaten, a quarter of a 
pound of loaf sugar, and a quarter of a pound of 
batter melted; whisk all well together, and poor 
into the dish ; bake one hour, and serve. 

No. 261.— VICTORIA PUDDING. 

Take of grated bread, mashed potatoes, grated 
carrots, finely chopped suet, sugar, and currants, 
each half a pouud, four eggs well beaten, a little 
salt, grated nutmeg, and lemon-peel, with a very 
little cinnamon ; mix all well together, put into a 
mould, and boil four hours. Serve with sweet sauce. 

No. 262.— BAKED LEMON PUDDING. 

Take four eggs, a quarter of a pound of fresh 
butter, a gill of cream, the juice of a lemon, and 
flavor with the peel rubbed on lumps of sugar; 
sweeten to taste, warm the butter in the cream over 
the fire, and beat all well together ; pour into a dish, 
and bake ; when done, cover the top with white of 
egg whipped to a snow-froth piled up, sift over it 
very finely pounded and sifted sugar; put it back 



PUDDINGS. 145 

into the oven for a few minutes, to color the white 
of egg slightly, or you may brown it with a salar 
mander. 

No. 263.— GERMAN PUDDING. 

Rub half a pound of sugar on the peel of two 
lemons, and pound it ; beat the whites of eight eggs 
to a stiff froth ; put the eight yolks, a quarter of a 
pound of fresh butter, and the juice of two lemons 
oyer a gentle fire, and make it into a soft custard; 
stand it upon ice, or in some very cold place, and 
beat it well for a quarter of an hour, then beat in 
the sugar, full half an hour, and add the beaten 
whites of the eggs ; have ready a plain mould well 
buttered, fill it, and place it in a stewpan half full of 
warm water, and put it in a moderate oven for 
three-quarters of an hour, turn it out, and serve it 
with wine sauce ; that is, wine made hot, and only 
sweetened with sugar. This method of boiling- 
baking all boiled puddings makes them very light. 

No. 264.— GERMAN RICE PUDDING. 

Boil half a pound of rice in a quart of milk till 

soft, add to it half a pound of fresh butter, leave it 

to cool, and then add the yolks of six eggs, a quarter 

of a pound of sweet and one or two bitter almonds, 

finely pounded, a quarter of a pound of sifted white 

sugar, a little cinnamon, and grated lemon-peel, and, 
10 



i 



146 PUDDINGS. 

last of all, the whites of the eggs beaten to a 
froth ; all must be mixed together very slowly; 
batter a mould well, put in the mixture, and boil it 
one hour in a saucepan of water placed in the oven. 
Turn it out, and serve with the following sauce :— 
two glasses of sherry, two eggs, and four lumps of 
sugar, to be beaten over the fire with a silver fork 
till it comes to a froth, when poar it round tbe 
pudding. 

No. 265.— GERMAN BROWN BREAD PUDDING. 

Take half a pound of brown bread, which must be 
dried in the oven the day before and then grated, 
a quarter of a pound of sweet almonds, and one or 
two bitter ones beaten to a paste, a quarter of a 
pound of sifted sugar, a little cinnamon, and a little 
finely grated lemon-peel, and mix the bread with a 
glass of sherry ; then add the almonds, the lemon- 
peel, and cinnamon, with the yolks of eight eggs ; 
all this must be well stirred for a quarter of an hour, 
and you must then add the whites of the eggs beaten 
to a snow-froth, and mix it all thoroughly together. 
Butter a shape well, fill it with the mixture, place it 
in a saucepan of water, and put it into the oven for 
half an hour; care must be taken that the water 
does .not touch the pudding. Turn it out when 
done, and serve it with the same sauce as in the 
preceding receipt. 



PITDDIKOS. 147 



No. 266.— BADEN PUDDING. 

Boil a tea-cupftd of rice in a pint of milk till it has 
swelled ; when done, stir in two ounces of finely 
chopped suet, a quarter of a pound of raisins, sugar 
to taste, and three eggs; mix all together, put it 
into a huttered mould, and boil it. Serve with 
sweet sauce flavored either with vaniUe or orange- 
flower water. 

No. 267.— GERMAN CABINET PUDDING WITH 
"QUICKEN" SAUCE. 

Take half a pound of sponge oi* savoy biscuits, 
place them in layers in a pudding mould, well 
buttered, seven eggs beaten well in three-quarters 
of a pint of milk, sugar to taste, and flavor with 
lemon -peel, and pour this mixture into the mould ; 
cover and boil three-quarters of an hour in boiling 
water. For the sauce, take four table-spoonfuls of 
preserved hips, which dissolve with some sugar in 
half a pint of French or German white wine, and 
pour over the pudding, and serve. 

No. 268.— APPLE CHARLOTTE. 

Butter a plain tin mould ; cut some slices of bread 
nearly a quarter of an inch thick, and cut some of 
these into diamonds the length of the top of your 
mould ; cut these again across the middle to make 



1 



148 PUDDINGS. 

tbem into three-cornered pieces ; cat the rest o^ the 
slices into lengths of the height of the mould and the 
width of two fingers ; dip all these pieces of bread 
into batter melted before the fire to oil, and arrange 
them neatly into the moald, the tbree-comered pieces 
at the top, each one jast overlappiDg the other, and 
the same way for the lengths, standing them ap 
round the sides of the mould. Take one dozen 
good-sized apples, prepare them as for sauce, dr^ 
the water from them, and put them into a stewpan 
with half a pound of pounded sugar and the rind of 
a lemon chopped very fine ; boil it for half an hoar, 
stirring it all the time, then pour it carefully into the 
mould which you have ready lined with the bread, 
and bake it for three-quarters of an hour. Turn it 
out of the mould, and serve immediately. 

No. 269.— FIG PUDDING. 

a 

Take half a pound of bread crumbs, half a pound 
of figs, six ounces of finely chopped suet, and six 
ounces of sugar, — the figs as well as the suet to be 
chopped very fine — ^then add three eggs well beaten, 
a little salt, nutmeg, and cinnamon, and mix all well 
together ; boil it in a mould four hours, and serve 
with wine sauce. 



puDDiNas. 149 

No. 270.— APPLE AND RICE SOUFFL*. 

Boil some rice in milk, with a little lemon-peel 
and cinnamon and sugar to taste, till the milk is 
soaked up, and the rice soft. Fill a large-tubed 
mould with the rice, place it in a saucepan of water, 
and stand it in the oven for half an hour, during 
which time prepare some apples as for sauce, sweet- 
ening them sufficiently, and flavoring them with 
lemon-peel. When the rice is done, turn it carefully 
out of the mould upon a dish, and fill in the hollow 
centre with the prepared apple ; next whip the 
whites of three or four eggs to a stiff snow-froth, 
pile it up high on the apples, so as to make a top 
to the mould of rice, sift very finely pounded sugar 
over it, brown it with a salamander slightly, and 
serve immediately. 

No. 21 1.— ARROW-ROOT SOTJFFL^. 

Take two ounces of arrow-root, two ounces of 
butter, a pint of milk, three ounces of sugar, a pinch 
of salt, and five eggs. BoU the milk with the sugar, 
mix the arrow-root well with a little cold milk, and 
then add the boiling milk gradually — stirring all the 
time to keep it smooth — and next the butter, then 
set it aside to cool ; when cold, stir in the yolks of the 
eggs, well beaten, and some essence of vanille, orange- 
flower water, or any liqueur to flavor the souffle, 



160 PUDDIKGS. 

and lastly, whip the whites of the eggs to a stiff 
snow-froth, and whisk in with the other ingredients ; 
fill a battered soafi6 mould or padding dish, and 
pat it into a qaick oven at once ; bake from half to 
three-quarters of an hour ; you will know when it is 
done by its rising, and the top looking set. Serve 
immediately, or it will fall and be good for nothing. 

No, 212.— ALMOND SOUFFL^. 

Take four ounces of blanched sweet almonds, and 
pound them in a mortar with two eggs till no lump 
can be felt, then put the almonds into a basin with 
four ounces of finely pounded sugar and the yolks 
of six eggs, and beat them well for half an hoar. 
Whip the whites of the eggs to a stiff snow-froth, 
and then stir them with three ounces of finely 
pounded biscuit into the other ingredients, and put 
into a buttered souffle mould and bake for half an 
hour, and serve immediately. 

No. 2t3.— KEITHOOH PANCAKES. 

Take four eggs, beat them well, and to every egg 
add a table-spoonful of flour ; mix and beat again, 
then stir in gradually a pint of milk, and add a pinch 
of salt and a little grated nutmeg. HaVe ready an 
omelet pan, or small round frying-pan, with a little 
bit of butter in it on the fire ; pour half a tea-cupful 
of ^e batter into it^ and turn round the pan (not the 



PUDDINGS. 161 

pancake) frequently over the fire for a minute or two ; 
their take it off the fire, and hold it upright in front 
of the bars ; the pancake will rise immediately and 
be thoroughly done : cut the edges, sprinkle a little 
powdered sugar over, and roll it up ; and so on till 
you have sufficient for . a dish, when they must be 
served immediately. 

No. 274.— POTATO FRITTERS. 

Take three large mealy potatoes, well boiled, mash 
them thoroughly, add a little pounded sugar, a little 
finely grated lemon-peel and juice, a small table- 
spoonful of flour, and the whites and yolks of three 
eggs ; beat all well together, and drop small spoon- 
fuls into boiling lard or clarified dripping; drain 
well, lay the fritters on a napkin in your dish, sift 
pounded sugar over them, and serve very hot. 

No. 215.— ORANGE FRITTERS, 

Peel three or four oranges, carefully taking off 
every scrap of the white part, without breaking the 
thin inner skin, and tear these into the natural 
divisions of the orange, dividing each into six or 
seven pieces, according to the size of the fruit ; dip 
each piece into a light batter, fry them (not too 
dark) in hot fat, drain well, and send to table im- 
mediately, piled high on a napkin in your dish, with 
powdered sugar sifted over them. 



162 PUDDINGS, 

No. 276.— SBVILLB PUDDINa 

Boil a small tea-cupM of Carolina rice in nearly a 
qnart of milk till soil and the milk is nearly eoaked 
up, then mix as much grated marmalade with it as 
will color and flavor it ; pour it into a well-buttered 
mould, and boil it again to make it turn out. Serve 
it with wine sauce. 

No. 277.— MARMALADE BREAD AND BUTTER 

PUDDING. 

Gut some slices of bread, without crust, a quarter 
of an inch in thickness, butter them well on one 
side, and upon this spread thickly some grated mar- 
malade, and divide the slices into pieces about two 
inches long by one wide ; lay these lightly in a well 
buttered pudding-dish; beat up three eggs with a 
pint of milk and pour in upon the bread, and bake 
the pudding half an hour in a moderate oven. 

No. 278.— FRIAR'S OMELET. 

Boil six large apples as for sauce, with the rind of 
one lemon grated, two ounces of fresh butter, and a 
little sugar, and when cold add two or three eggs 
well beaten. Take a deep dish, butter it well, strew 
bread crumbs thickly over the bottom and sides, put 
in the apples, etc., and strew more bread cnimbs all 
over the top. When baked, turn it out on to a dish, 
strew sugar over the top^ and serve. 



SWEET DISHES. 153 



SWEET DISHES. 



No. 279.— LEMON SOITFFL^. 

Put a pint and a half of milk into a stewpan with 
the rind of five lemons and one ounce of isinglass, 
and let it J^oil ten minutes; beat up the yolks of 
eight eggs, and when the milk is nearly cold, mix 
them with it and put it on the fire to thicken ; take 
it off, and as soon as it cools, stir in the whites of 
the eggs which you have whipped to a stiff froth, 
half a pound of powdered sugar, the juice of the 
lemons, and about three ounces of pistachio nuts 
chopped fine, and two ounces of well-washed cur- 
rants, and mix thoroughly. Butter your mould, 
sprinkle it with some of the chopped pistachio nuts, 
then pour the souffle carefully in ; place it in ice or 
in a very cold place to set it, then turn it out of the 
mold, and serve. 

No. 280.— ORANGE JELLY. 

Squeeze a sufficient number of oranges to give a 
pint and a half of juice. Pare the rind of two 
oranges and one lemon very thin, and put them into 



154 SWEET DISHES. 

a stewpan with half a pint of water, and let it boil 
till all the flayor is .goue from the peels into the 
water, then strain it off and dissolve in it over the 
fire one ounce of gelatine (Nelson's) or isinglass, 
and half a pound of sugar; when dissolved and 
nearly cold pour into it the orange-juice, stir it 
thoroughly till mixed, then pour it into an oiled 
mould, and place it on ice or in a cold place till set. 

No. 281.— CALF'S FOOT JELLY. 

Put an ox-foot or two calf's feet into a stewpan 
with three quarts of water,, and boil very slowly 
several hours till reduced to half the quantity, skim 
well, and set by to get cold ; when quite cold and 
set, take off most carefully every particle of fet, and 
wipe the top with a clean cloth to make sure of all 
the grease being off, and put it into a stewpan (bo 
particular to leave all the sediment) with loaf sugar 
to taste, the very thinly cut peel of three large 
lemons and the juice of four or five, rubbing some 
of the lumps of sugar upon the lemons after they 
have been peeled, to get all the flavoring you can ; 
melt all together, and add rather more than half a 
pint of sherry. Have ready the whites and shells of 
five eggs well beaten, but not to snow, pour into the 
jelly and whisk well together on the fire ; let it hoil 
from twenty to thirty minutes, according to the heat 
of the fire, then run it through a jelly-bag till quite 



SWEET DISHES. 165 

clear, and when nearly cold fill a mould which you 
have previously wetted with cold water, and set in 
ice or in some cool place. 

No. 282.— BLANC-MANGE. 

Dissolve one ounce of isinglass or Nelson's gela- 
tine in a pint of milk, with ^ bit of cinnamon and 
lemon-peel, put to it a pint of cream, two ounces of 
sweet almonds, and six bitter almonds, blanched and 
beaten together quite smooth with a little* orange- 
flower water or cold water, sugar to taste, and stir 
it over the fire till it boils ; strain and let it cool, 
then pour it into a mould which you have previously 
oiled, and set it in a cold place. 

No. 283.— WHOLE EICE BLANC-MANGE. 

Put a quarter of a pound of Carolina rice in a 
quart of good milk, and boil slowly for a long time, 
flavoring with' three or four bitter almonds, lemon- 
peel, and cinnamon, and sweetening to taste ; then 
put it into a mould, tie it down close, and boil half an 
hour in a saucepan of water, taking care that the 
water does not get into the mould. When cold, turn 
it out of the mould on to a dish, place any kind of 
jam you like round it, and serve with custard or 
cream. 



166 SWEET DISHES. 

No. 284.— GROUND RICE BLANC-MANGB. 

Take a qaarter of a pound of ground rice, a 
quarter of a pound of sugar pounded, six bitter 
almonds blanched and pounded, a little lemon-peel 
and cinnamon, and put all together into a quart of 
new milk, and boil tM quite thick, stirring it well — 
it must be thoroughly boiled ; take out all the lemon- 
peel and cinnamon, and pour it into a wetted mould. 
When quite cold and set, 'turn it out of the mould, 
pour some fruit syrup round it in the dish, and serve 
it with cream to eat with it. 

No. 285.— ARROW-ROOT BLANC-MANGE. 

Mix one table-spoonful and a half of arrow-root 
and half a table-spoonful of flour with a little cold 
milk ; boil a pint of milk, flavoring it with bitter 
almonds, lemon -peel and sugar, strain it through a 
sieve upon the arrow-root, stirring it all the time, aud 
then put it on the fire, stUl continuing to stir it, and 
let it boil till quite thick. Pour it into a wetted 
mould, turn it out the next day and ser^e it with any 
kind of preserve round it in the dish, and either 
custard or cream. 

No. 286.— ICELAND MOSS BLANC-MANGE. 

Take one ounce of the moss and pick it carefully 
from aU giitty and sandy particles, soak it in cold 



SWEET DISHES. 157 

TV'ater about twelve hours, take it from the water and 
put in a colander to strain ; then put it in a stewpan 
on the fire with a pint and a half of good new milk, 
let it boil half an hour, stirring it all the time to 
prevent burning, and while boiling sweeten to your 
taste, and flavor with ratafia or vanille. At the end 
of half an hour's boiling, the moss will be almost 
dissolved, leaving nothing but a few thready fibres ; 
strain it through a fine sieve into a mould, and when 
quite cold and set, turn it out and sei^v^e. 

No. 28'7.— BED ROBIN. 

Take one pound and a half of lump sugar and put 
it into a stewpan with a pint of water, and boil till 
it becomes thick, then add two pounds of apples, 
peeled and cored, and the rind of a large lemon cut 
thin, and boil all together till it is quite stiff, stirring 
it frequently to prevent burning ; then pour it into 
a mould, and when cold turn it out, and serve with a 
rich custard, or it is very good alone. 

No. 288.— SLIP CURD. 

Take half a tumbler of sherry, a quarter of a pound 
of loaf sugar, half the rind of a lemon cut very thin, 
and on the other half rub some of the lumps of sugar 
to give more flavor, mix this till the sugar is all dis- 
solved. From a quart of milk take a cupful and 
warm it sufficiently with a piece of rennet the size of 



168 SWEET DISHES. 

a nutmeg, to make the rest of tbe milk lukewarm 
when added to it. Put the wine, etc., into a glass 
dish, pour the milk upon it, first taking out the ren- 
net (which must be well washed before it is put into 
the milk), audi when the curd is sufBciently set and 
cold, send it to table. 

No. 289.--APPLE WHIP. 

Take twelve large apples, bake them quite soft, 
pulp them through a sieve, sweeten to taste, and 
flavor with lemon-peel rubbed on sugar ; whip well 
with a whiski and then add the whites of two eggs, 
and continue whipping for three quarters of an hour. 
The quantity which will fill a pint basin before it is 
whipped would fill a large colander after the whisk- 
ing, and should be as white as snow. Pile it high in 
a glass dish, and serve at once. 

No. 290.— GINGER APPLES. 

Take seven pounds of Newtown pippins, pare, 
core, and throw them into cold water to preserve 
their color ; take weight for weight of loaf sugar, put 
half a pint of water to every pound of sugar, place it 
on the fire in a stewpan, and bring it to a boil ; then 
take your apples out of the water and put them in 
the syrup, with three quarters of a pound of nicely- 
cleaned ginger ; let them boil till they become clear 
(they take nearly an hour's boiling on a pretty quick 



SWEET DISHES. 159 

fire before they become so), and serve them when 
cold. They will keep for some time in a jar closely 
covered down, if put into a cool, dry place. 

No. 291.— ITALIAN SPONGE. 

Dissolve two ounces of isinglass in rather more 
than a pint of water, strain it and add to it the juice 
of three lemons free from pips; mix it with one 
pound of loaf sugar, and the rinds of two lemons 
pared thin, and boil all together for ten minutes ; 
strain it through muslin, and let it stand till quite 
cold and it is set ; then whisk it, and add the whites 
of two eggs well beaten to the mixture when you 
begin to whisk it, and in ten minutes it will become 
the consistency of sponge ; wet a mould thoroughly 
and put it in immediately. 

No. 292.— RUSSIAN KESALB. 

Take some cranberries, and press out the juice, and 
to six tea-cupfuls of the juice allow one tea-cupful of 
arrow-root and one tea-cupful of sugar ; put four tea- 
cupfuls of the juice into a stewpan and boil it with 
the sugar ; and while this is going on, keep stirring 
the arrow-root and the two cups of .cold juice together 
the whole timei that it may be quite smooth ; if you 
stop, the arrow-root settles down. As soon as the 
juice and sugar boil, stir it very quickly before pour- 
ing in the cold mixture, and do not stop for a mo- 



160 SWEET DISHES. 

ment when yon have added it till yoa have mixed 
it quite smooth, and let it hoil np three times in 
buhbles. Have ready a wetted mould, pour in the 
kesale, pnt it in a cold place to become firm, then 
turn it out of the mould, and serve it with cream. 

No. 293.— GERMAN CREAM. 

Take one onnce and a half of sweet and six bitter 
almonds, blanch and pound them, six ounces of 
white sugar, and a pint of cream flavored with 
ratafia, lemon-peel or van ill e, in which dissolve one 
ounce of isinglass ; put all into a stewpan on the 
fire ; then take half an ounce of arrow-root, and mix 
it very smooth with a little cold water, beat well 
five eggs, and stir them in with the arrow-root ; when 
the cream is quite warm, add the eggs and arrow- 
root, and boil only for one minute, constantly stir- 
ring lest it curdle. Wet a mould in cold water, pour 
in the cream, and let it stand till cold before you turn 
it out. 

No. 294.— MTLLE FRUIT CREAM. 

Take three quarters of an ounce of gelatine, put it 
into a basin with a little cold water, enough to cover 
it, and let it stand to soak and swell ; in the mean 
time, batter the inside of your mould, and garnish it 
with handsome pieces of preserved cucumber, angel- 
ica, ginger, cherries, etc. ; then take milk and cream. 



SWEET DISHES. 161 

of eadb half a pint, pat it into a large basin, and 
whisk it well until it becomes thick and light ; then 
have ready some nice pieces of the fruit the same as 
you garnished with, some syrup of the same, and some 
finely-powdered sugar ; stir these into your cream to 
flavor, and sweeten it to your taste. Pour on the 
gelatine as much boiling water as will dissolve it, but 
as little as possible ; stir it well till dissolved, then 
pour it through a double piece of muslin into the 
whipped cream, stirring it all the time lightly but 
quickly with your whisk, then let it stand a few 
minutes till you see it beginning to set ; you may 
then put it into your mould, being careful not to dis- 
place the garnish. Put it into a cold place for three 
or four hours, when it will be firm enough to turn out 

No. 295.— GERMAN RUM CREAM. 
Take one pint of cream, rather more than a gill oi 
rum, a quarter of a pound of sifted sugar, half an 
ounce of gelatine, the rind of a lemon, and the yolks 
of seven eggs. Rub the lemon with lumps of sugar, 
beat the yolks of the eggs with a little of the cream, 
and melt the gelatine in the remainder ; then mix 
the whole together, and stir over the fire till it thick- 
ens. Pour it into an oiled mould, turn it it out when 
cold, and serve with a fruit sauce over it. For the 
sauce, take any kind of fresh fruit, such as straw- 
berries, currants, or raspberries, bruise them, pres^ 
11 



163 SWEET DISHES. 

throngh a sieve, and add sugar to taste, and a glass 
of claret, or any kind of light red wine ; mix jveU 
together, and pour over the puddiag. 

No. 296.— GATEAU DE NAPLEa 

Take a sponge cake baked in a plain round monid, 
and cat it into slices nearly an inch thick, as you 
wonld a tea-cake ; pour over each slice some white 
wine to soak it tolerably, but not too much, then pat 
the bottom slice of your cake into the dish in which 
yon are going to serve it, and upon this soaked slice 
of cake pour gradually on the top, so as to cover it 
all over, a large table-spoonful of either noyeau, cu- 
rayoa, or maraschino ; on this place a layer of any 
nice preserve, such as apricot, plum, or pine-apple ; 
then the next slice to the bottom of soaked cake, 
proceeding as before with the liqueur, and preserve 
till you get to the top slice of the cake, which should 
only hme the wine and liqueur over it on the under 
side, and this place on the preserve of the previous 
slice. Whip up lightly half a pint of cream, sweet- 
ening with pounded sugar and flavoring it ^ith 
lemon-peel rubbed on sugar ; pour this over the cake, 

and serve. 

No. 297.— STANDING CUSTARD. 

Take a pint of new milk, set it on the fire, and 
when it boils have ready the yolks of six eggs and 



SWEET DISHES. 163 

two ounces of loaf Bugar well beaten ; whip them in 
the milk, and then set it on the fire again, bat do not 
let it boil ; then whip it till nearly cold, and add half 
an ounce of isinglass well dissolved, and whip it 
again till thick enough to put into the mould : oil 
your mould, fill it with the custard, and let it stand 
till next day, then turn it out and pour the following 
sauce over it : — ^make a thinnish syrup with some fine 
loaf sugar, cut the peel of a lemon into very fine 
chips ; when the sugar is boiling, squeeze in some 
lemon-juice, and when lukewarm throw in the chips. 
As soon as it is quite cold, pour it over the custard 
before it is sent to table. 

No. 298.— CUSTARDS. 

Take one pint of milk and half a pint of cream, the 
yolks of eight eggs well beaten, the thin rind of a 
lemon, six bitter almonds, sugar to taste, and a glass 
of brandy ; put all into a large jug, and pkice in a 
saucepan of boiling water, keep on stirring one way 
as soon as your custard becomes hot and begins to 
thicken ; and when sufficiently thick, instantly take it 
ofi*the fire, or it will curdle, and keep stirring till it 
cools. The almonds should be thoroughly pounded, 
and do not add the brandy till you take it off the fire, 
when you must remove the lemon-peel ; when cold, 
send to table in a glass dish or custard cups. 



164 SWEET DISHES. 

Na 299.— ORANGE OUSTARDa 

Boll the rind of half a Seville orange till very ten- 
der, and beat it in a mortar till quite smooth ; put to 
it a table-Bpoonful of brandy, the juice of a Seville 
orange, four ounces of loaf-sugar, and the yolks of 
four eggs ; beat all well together ten minutes, and 
pour in by degrees a pint of boiling cream or new 
milk ; keep beating the whole time till cold, then 
pour into the custard cups, and set them in a deep 
dish of hot water, and let them stand till they are set 

No. 300.— LEMON CHEBSE-OAKEa 

To a quarter of pound of fresh butter add one 
pound of loaf sugar broken small, six eggs, leaving 
out the whites of two, the grated rind of two lemons, 
and the juice of three ; put all into a clean stewpan 
(well tinned), and let it simmer over a slow fire, stir- 
ring all the time, till it is as thick as good honey and 
the sugar is dissolved ; pour into small jars, and tie 
them down closely, keep it in a dry place, and it will 
remain good for years. Use it as for other kinds of 
cheese-cakes, with puff paste in little tartlet tins. 

No. 301.— OOCOANUT CHBESB-OAKBa 

Take one pound of grated cocoanut, one pound of 
sifted loaf sugar, half a pound of butter, five yolks of 
eggs, three whites, and three table-spoonfuls of best 



SWEET DISHES. 165 

rose-water, and boil the whole twenty minutes ; the 
milk of the cocoanat to be added to the rose-water, 
and put to the rest of the ingredients while boiling. 
Pour into jars, tie them down closely, keep in a dry 
cool place, and use the cheese-cake preparation for 
filling little tartlet tins lined with puff paste when 
required. 

No. 302.— RIOB CHEESE-OAKES. 

Take a quarter of a pound of finely sifted ground 
rice, a quarter of a pound of sifted loaf sugar, a quar- 
ter of a pound of ftesh butter beaten to a cream, and 
the yolks of four eggs ; the eggs and sugar must be 
well beaten together, then the butter and rice added, 
the whites of the eggs beaten separately ; mix all 
together, and flavor with a small blade of mace, finely 
pounded, and a table-spoonful of rose-water, or the 
peel of two lemons rubbed on sugar. The quicker 
this is made, the lighter the cheese-cakes will be ; the 
batter should be poured into little tartlet tins, not 
quite full, and baked in a brisk oven. Serve them 
cold. 

No. 303.— GOOSEBERRY FOOL. 

Take a quart of green gooseberries, put them into 
a deep dish, and bake them in the oven till quite soft, 
then pulp them through a coarse sieve, and add 
pounded sugar to taste ; when cold stir in a gill of 



166 STTEET DISHES. 

cream, mix thoronghly, and serve in a glass dish or 
onstard cups. 

No. 304.— CURRANT FOOL. 

Stew ripe red currants with sufficient sugar to 
sweeten them, and when done pulp them through a 
coarse sieve, -and add sufficient cream and very fine 
bread crumbs to make it thick enough ; serve when 
cold in custard cups or a glass dish. 

No. 305.— STEWED PRUNES. 

If the prunes are not very dry, an hour's soaking 
in cold water will be sufficient ; but if they are old, 
they should be put to soak over night. Make a thin 
syrup, and put in some fine shreds of lemon-peel, then 
stew the prunes in the syrup in a stewpan closely 
covered for about three hours, till quite tender, and 
while stewing add a glass of white wine. When cold, 
serve in a glass dish, with cream or custard to eat 
with them. 

No. 306.— FRUIT SALAD, OR MAC^DOINE. 

Peel two oranges as thin as possible, then rub the 
oil from them on some lump sugar ; put the sugar 
with the rind into a stewpan, with a little water to 
make a syrup, add the juice of a lemon, strain out 
the rinds, and set the syrup by to get cold. Peel 
some apples and oranges (carefully taking off every 



SWEET DISHES. 167 

scrap of the white peel from the latter), cnt them into 
small pieces, bat do not cut the oranges so small as 
the apples ; then take whatever nice preserved fruits 
you may have, such as dried cherries, whole straw- 
berries, raspberries, pieces of pine-apple, angelica, 
cucumber, ginger, apricot, etc., all or any of these, 
and pile them up in a glass dish, with the pieces of 
oranges and apples, mixing them as you proceed ; 
then peel a couple more oranges, cut them nicely in 
quarters, and place them on the top with some of 
your best fruits ; then pour over all, first the orange 
syrup, and lastly two table-spoonfuls of cura9oa or 
noyeau. Should the apples and oranges be acid, the 
macedoine must be sweetened as it is made, by strew- 
ing finely powdered sugar over these fruits, and it 
should not stand long after making before it is sent 
to table. 



168 PASTBY. 



PASTET. 



No. 307.— PUFF PASTE. 

Take a quarter of a pound of flour and a quarter 
of a pound of fresh butter, and press the butter in a 
clean cloth, to extract all the water or buttermilk 
(this can only be done when the butter is hard). 
Take one-third of the butter, and r\ib it into the 
flour with the hand till thoroughly well mixed, then 
with a spoon stir in a table-spoonful or less of water, 
and form with a spoon into a very stiff paste ; put it 
on your board, and roll it out once each way, not 
too thin, fold in the four ends inwards, and roll first 
lengthways and then sideways, till the paste forms a 
long piece nearly a quarter of a yard wide ; put on 
half the remaining butter in little dabs, sprinkle with 
flour, fold in four, roll length and then sideways, dab 
on the rest of the butter, sprinkle with flour, and roll 
after folding in four, the same as before, twice over, 
that is, in all, three times ; then sprinkle with flour, 
fold in four, and roll length and then sideways, again 
sprinkle with flour, fold in four, and roll length and 
sideways the second time, rolling the paste thinner 
each time ; fold in four, and give a slight roll at the 



PASTRY. 169 

end, and put it away to cool for ten minutes ; then 
roll out the length very thin, and use for whatever 
purpose it is required. 

No. 308.— SHORT CRUST. ' 

To six ounces of flour take three ounces of butter ; 
put the butter into a basin with the flour, pinch off 
little bits of the butter with your fingers, and rub 
into the flour most thoroughly ; then moisten with as 
little water as possible, only just enough to hold the 
paste together (a little more than a dessert-spoonful 
MTill be sufficient if the butter has been well rubbed 
in), as the less water you use the shorter the crust 
will be. Put the paste upon your board, and roll out 
of the desired thickness. This quantity is sufficient 
for the cover of a middling-sized fruit tart, and for 
all juicy fruits this inexpensive receipt will be found 
delicious. 

No. 309.— SUET CRUST FOR MEAT PIES. 

To three-quarters of a pound of flour take half a 
pound of beef suet ; pound the suet to a soft mash, 
and take out all the fibre, then make the crust pre- 
cisely in the same way as the receipt for puff paste, 
using the pounded suet instead of butter ; but there is 
no necessity for setting it aside to cool, as it may be 
used for a pie at once. 



170 PASTRY. 

No. 310.-^RITST FOR RAISED PIEa 

Take one pound of flour to two ounces of butter; 
put the butter into a stewpan with a tea-cupful of 
water to boil, and mix it with the flour while it is 
boiling hot, first with a spoon, and then with the 
hand; roll out the proper thickness, and use as 
desired. 

No. 311.--ITALIAN PASTRY. 

Take a quarter of a pound of butter, a quarter of a 
pound of powdered sugar, and half a pound of flour, 
mix well together, and moisten with the yolks of two 
eggs; roll very thin, and cut with a cutter into 
shapes or fingers ; bake them on a baking-sheet, and 
when done place two of them together with jam 
between, and arrange them nicely in a dish. 

No. 312.— GENOA PASTRY. 

Take two eggs, and their weight in the shell in 
fresh butter, the same in powdered sugar, and the 
same in dried flour ; beat the eggs well, and mix all 
together — adding any flavoring you wish — with a 
wooden spoon into a batter, and spread smoothly 
with a knife on a baking-sheet that has a raised 
edge all round it ; bake, and while hot cut into any 
form you please, place two together with jam be- 
tween, and arrange them nicely in your dish. 



PASTET. 171 

No. 313.— FRENCH PASTRT. 

This is made with puff paste ; roll it out very thin, 
and fold over the end about half an inch deep, and 
continue rolling it round and round several times ; 
cut it across at the end of the roU in slices the 
thickness of a penny piece, and lay these slices (on 
one of the sides that has been cut) on a baking-sheet, 
not placing them too near together, so as to give 
them room to expand; sprinkle sifted sugar over, 
and bake them a very pale color. Place two to- 
gether with jam between, and pile them in a dish, 
and serve. They should be so very light that great 
care must be taken not to break them in spreading 
the jam. 

No. 314.— ALMOND PASTE FOR TARTLETS. 

Take one pound of sweet almonds, blanch quickly 
in boiling water, then throw them into cold water, 
and let them soak four hours ; then pound them well 
in a mortar, adding a little water to prevent their 
becoming oily, and after they are beaten very smooth 
and become a paste, put to them three-quarters of a 
pound of powdered sugar, and mix all together in 
the mortar. When your paste is quite fine and 
smooth, take it out of the mortar, put it into a stew- 
pan over a slow fire, and stir it with a wooden spoon 
till it becomes white and dry; then put it again into 



173 PA8TBY. 

the mortar, and mix with it a little melted gam 
tragacanth which has been strained through a fine 
muslin, and flavor it as you please with either lemon, 
Tanille, rose, or orange-flower, etc., and keep the 
paste covered to prevent its drying ; roll it out thin, 
line small round tartlet tins with it, fill each with a 
little of any choice preserve, and bake a delicate 
color in a moderate oven. This delicions paste can 
be kept ready for use for some weeks if, as soon as it 
is made, it is put into a jelly pot, and always cov- 
ered over with a damp cloth to prevent its drying ; 
it should remain in a cool place, and can be baked as 
wanted. 



CAKES AKD BISOUITS. 173 



CAKES AND BISCUITS. 



No. 315.— SPONaS CAKE. 

Put three-quarters of a pound of loaf sugar in a 
9.tewpan with nearly half a pint of water, and the peel 
of a lemon cut very thin, and let it simmer twenty 
minutes. Beat the yolks of eight eggs, and the whites 
of four in a large basin for ten minutes, then pour in 
the boiling syrup, and whip it fully half an hour, 
when stir in as quickly as possible ten ounces of 
well-dried flour ; have ready the mould well buttered 
inside with oiled butter, over which sift very finely 
powdered sugar and flour, fasten a band of buttered 
stiff paper round the edge of the mould, pour in the 
mixture directly the flour is added, and bake in 
rather a quick oven about half an hour. This quan- 
tity is sufficient for a large cake or two middle-sized 
ones, as the mould should not be filled to the top, so 
as to leave space for the cake to rise, which it will do 
considerably if the mixture has been well and lightly 
beaten. 

No. 316.— POUND OAKB. 

Take a pound of flour, a pound of sifted sugar, 
three-quarters of a pound of butter, and five eggs ^ 



174 OAKES AOT) BISCUITS. 

beat the eggs well and the sugar with them, beat the 
the butter to cream with a table-spoonful of milk, 
add the eggs and sugar to it, and afterwards the flour 
well dried ; mix aU thoroughly together, put into a 
buttered tin, and bake. 

No. 31T.— DEVON CURRANT CAKE. 

Take three pounds of flour, two pounds of cur- 
rants, half a pound of crushed sugar, half a pound of 
cream, two ounces of citron or candied peel, ten 
eggs, three or four drops of essence of lemon, one 
ounce of tartaric acid, one ounce of carbonate of 
soda, and a pint and a half of new milk. Put the 
flour, currants, and candied peels, cut small, together 
in a pan ; make the milk hot, dissolve the sugar in it, 
and pour the hot milk to the cream, giving it a stir ; 
have ready the eggs — ^the yolks and whites well 
beaten together — and add the milk, cream, and sugar 
to the eggs, stirring whilst doing so, and at the same 
time putting in the essence of lemon ; pour this 
mixture to the flour, etc., and then add the two 
powders free from lumps, and mix quickly. Put 
in a well-buttered tin and place immediately in a 
moderately hot oven ; it will take about three hours 
to bake, and the lightness of the cake depends upon 
its being made as quickly as possible. 



CAKES AND BISCUITS. 176 

No. 318.— RICH PLUM CAKE. 

Take one pom\d of fresh butter, one pound of 
sugar, one pound and a half of dried flour, two 
pounds of currants well cleaned, one pouud of citron, 
two ounces of sweet almonds, ten eggs, half an ounce 
of allspice, and a quarter of an ounce of cinnamon, 
both pounded, and a glass of brandy. Beat the 
whites of the eggs to a stiff snow-froth, then beat 
the butter to a cream, and put in the pounded 
sugar; stir it till quite light, adding the pounded 
spices, and when you have stirred it for a quarter of 
an hour, take the yolks of the eggs and work them in 
two or three at a time, then gradually add the well- 
beaten whites of the eggs, and next the citron, 
orange, and lemon peels cut in fine strips, and the 
almonds either pounded or chopped very fine ; mix 
all thoroughly together, and then put in the dried 
flour and glass of brandy, and mix again. Bake in 
a well-buttered tin hoop in a hot oven for three 
hourS) putting twelve sheets of paper under the cake 
and four or five on the top to keep it from burning. 

No. 319.— SODA PLUM CAKE. 

Take one pound of dried flour, half a pound of 
fresh butter, half a pound of moist sugar, half a 
pound of raisins, half a pound of currants, two 
ounces each of citron, lemon, and orange peels, four 



176 CAKES AND BISCUITS. 

eggs, two doves pounded together with allspice, 
nutmeg, and cinnamon to taste, and half a tea-cupftil of 
milk or cream in which you have dissolved half a 
tea-spoonfnl of carhonate of soda. Hub the floor and 
butter t^^gether first, then add the other ingredients, 
and lastly the eggs, milk, and soda ; mix thoroughly, 
and immediately put into a round tin and place in a 
slow oven, to bake about two hours. 

No. 320.— ALMOND CAKE. 

Take half a pound of sweet and two ounces of 
bitter almonds, blanched and well pounded, half a 
pound of finely sifted loaf sugar, nine eggs, the 
whites of four ; the eggs and sugar are to be well 
whisked together very fast for half an hour ;. then 
put in the pounded almonds, and continue beating 
the whole half an hour longer, when put into a tin 
mould lined with buttered paper, and bake an hour 
in a brisk oven. 

No. 321.— CINNAMON CAKE. 

Take half a pound of dried flour, half a pound of 
fresh butter, half a pound of sifted sugar, the whites 
of eight eggs beaten to a snow-froth, and sufficient 
pounded and sifted cinnamon to flavor the cake 
rather strongly and to give it a pinkish color ; mix 
all well together very lightly, put iti, into a buttered 



CAKES AND BISCUITS, 177 

mould, and bake in rather a quick oven about half 
an hour. 

No. 322.— SCOTCH SEED-TIME CAKE. 

Take nine eggs, three quarters of a pound of finely 
pounded sugar, and beat the sugar and eggs together 
till thick and white, ten ounces of fresh butter beaten 
to a cream, three-quarters of a pound of citron, half 
a pound of candied orange-peel sliced, and half a 
pound of sweet almonds blanched and cut small ; 
add one pound of well-dried flour to the beaten eggs 
and sugar, and then the butter and other ingredients ; 
mix all together thoroughly, and bake in a round hoop 
or a tin lined with well-buttered paper. If you like, 
you may sprinkle the top of the cake with large- 
sized carraway sugar-plums. 

No. 323.— DUNDEE GINGERBREAD. 

Take two pounds of well-dried flour, half a pound 

of powdered sugar, three-quarters of a pound of 

candied orange and lemon peels cut in thin slices, 

three ounces of ginger, one ounce and a half of (jar- 

raway seeds, and a quarter of an ounce of cloves 

pounded ; mix these well together with two pounds of 

treacle dissolved on the fire, and half a pound of fresh 

butter beaten to a cream ; beat three eggs till they are 

light and thick, mix with the other ingredients, and 

then beat the whole half an hour longer. Bake in 
12 



178 CAKES AND BISCUITS. 

buttered oblong tins (from two to three incbes in 
height), in a moderate oven. This gingerbread will 
keep a long time. 

No. 324.— PLAIN GINaERBREAD. 

Take half a pound of well-dried flour, half a pound 
of treacle, half a pound of sugar, a quarter of a pound 
of butter, one ounce of sifted ginger, a quarter of an 
ounce of allspice, and two eggs ; dissolve about a 
tea-spoonful of carbonate of soda in a very small 
quantity of milk; melt the butter and treacle 
together over the fire, but be careful they do not 
boil, then mix the flour and sugar together in a 
bowl, pour in the butter and treacle, stirring it well, 
and then add the eggs — which must be thoroughly 
beaten, whites and yolks separately — the spices, and 
lastly the soda ; mix aU well and lightly together, 
and put into a well-buttered tin, and bake in a slow 
oven ; an hour should be sufficient to bake it, but it 
is better to leave it in an extra quarter, with the 
oven-door open. 

No. '325.— GINGERBREAD CAKES. 
Take one pound of treacle, one pound and a half 
of dried flour, half a pound of sugar, half a pound of 
fresh butter, and one ounce and a half of ginger; 
mix all well together, roll out rather thin, and cut 
with a small round tin cutter, and bake on iron 
sheets in a moderate oven. 



CAKES AND BISCUITS. 179 

No. 326.— ROCK CAKES. 

Take one pound of dried flour, and mix it with six 
ounces of finely powdered sugar ; beat six ounces of 
fresh butter to a cream, and add it to three eggs 
well beaten, half a pound of well washed and dried 
currants, and the flour and sugar ; beat all for some 
time, adding a spoonful of brandy and a little nut- 
meg, pounded mace and grated lemon-peel, to flavor 
the batter ; then dredge some flour on tin or iron 
plates, and drop the batter on them the size of a 
walnut ; if properly mixed the paste wiU be stiff, so 
that you will be able to keep the tops of the cakes 
quite rough ; stick them with blanched almonds 
Bliced, and bake a light color in a moderate oven. 

No. 32'7.— SHREWSBURY CAKES. 

Take three quarters of a pound of dried flour, ten 
ounces of fresh butter, well beaten, six ounces of 
sifted sugar, and a very little finely pounded mace ; 
mix up the paste with a small quantity of rose-water, 
roll it out thin, cut with a round tin cutter into small 
cakes, place them on a baking-sheet which you have 
dredged with flour, and bake in a moderate oven, 
keeping them a light color. 

No. 328.— ARROW-ROOT CAKES. 

Take a breakfast-cupful of arrow-root, about a 
quarter of that quantity of white sugar finely 



180 CAKES AND BISCUITS. 

poanded, one ounce and a half of fresh bntter, the 
yolk and white of one large egg, and sufficient 
nutmeg and grated lemon-peel to flavor the cakes. 
Butter well the inside of a small stewpan, put in the 
ingredients, and boil them all together, stirring all 
the time, until very light, and of a pretty thick sob- 
stance ; then drop the paste upon a baking-sheet in 
small round shapes, the size of a shilling, and bake 
in a moderate oven a very light color. These cakes 
should look rather rough, thick, and almost white, 
and make a very nice dish for dessert. 

No. 329.--lem:on cakes. 

Take one egg^ a little flour, a small piece of butter, 
a little rose-water, the rind of a lemon grated off 
with lumps of sugar, till the paste is sweet enough ; 
then mix all well together, and roll out as thin as 
possible on a marble slab ; cut into round shapes* 
with a tin cutter, and bake on a tin sheet in a quick 
oven. Serve them for dessert. 

No. 330.— ORANGE BISCUITS. 

Take five nice oranges, grate the rind from them, 
and put into a mortar, with a quarter of a pound of 
sweet almonds and three-quarters of a pound of 
lump sugar, finely pounded ; mix all well up with 
the whites of two eggs, then work the whole 
thoroughly in the mortar with the pestle, for the 



OAKES AND BISCUITS. 181 

more it is pounded the lighter it becomes. Have 
the oven ready, moderately hot, lay three sheets of 
paper on a baking tin, and drop the mixture on 
the paper about the size of a nutmeg, but not too 
near together, as the biscuits spread so much in the 
oven. As soon as they are baked a nice brown 
color, not too dark, take them out of the oven, and 
let them stand till cold, when they will come off 
the paper easily. Serve them for dessert. 

No. 331.--WHIP BISCUITS. 

Take the whites of three new-laid eggs, and whip 
them to a very stiff snow-froth, then add by degrees 
a quarter of a pound of very finely pounded loaf 
sugar, and a dessert-spoonful of the best double dis- 
tilled rose-water. Drop about half a tea-spoonful at 
a time on writing paper, not too near together, and 
bake on a board, as you would meringues, in a very 
slow oven with the door open, as they should not get 
brown. You may color half of the quantity a 
pretty pink with extract of cochineal ; the pink and 
white biscuits, served in a little pile on a lace-edged 
dessert paper, make a pretty dish for dessert. If the 
taste of rose-water be not liked, you may add any 
other flavoring instead. 



182 OAKES AND BISOXTtTS. 

No. 332.-M30COANXJT CAKEa 

Grate the nut (scraping off the rind) very fine, 
and add half its weight in finely pounded white 
sugar ; mix them well together with white of eggy 
and drop on wafer paper in small rough knobs about 
the size of a walnut, and bake in a slack oven. Ex- 
cellent for dessert. 

No. 333.— CHOCOLATE CAKES. 

Take the whites of three new-laid eggs, and beat 
them well with a quarter of a pound of finely po^nded 
sugar, and a third part of a cake of chocolate 
scraped very fine; drop in small round cakes on 
writing paper, and bake them in a slow oven. Serve 
them for dessert or at luncheon. 

No. 334.— APPLE CAKES. 

Take one pound weight of codlings, after they 
have been pared and cored, stew them tender, and 
then pulp them through a sieve upon a ponnd and a 
half of sifted sugar ; then with a whisk beat them 
together for ap hour, and drop on writing paper in 
small round cakes. Dry them in the sun, or in a 
screen before the kitchen fire, and when dry enough 
put them by in a tin box (leaving them on the paper) 
in a dry place, to keep for use for dessert. 



CAKES AND BISCUITS. 183 

No. 33&7--GOOSEBERBY CAKES. 

Place a jar of unripe gooseberries in a kettle of 
water on the fire, and when they are quite soil, rub 
them through a fine sieve, and to every pound of 
pulp add the white of an egg and a pound of sifted 
sugar; beat all up till quite thick and light, and drop 
in small round cakes on writing paper to dry in the 
sun or in a screen before tbe fire. When dry enough, 
take them off the paper, and put them by in a box 
in a dry place, to serve for dessert in the winter. 
These cakes are also excellent made with pulped 
raspberries instead of gooseberries, but the fruit 
must not be too ripe, or the raspberry pulp will be 
too liquid for the purpose. 

No. 336.— SCOTCH BISCUITS. 

Take two ounces of fi*esh butter, and rub it well 
into one pound of well-dried fiour, add a pinch of 
salt, and sufficient milk to make it into a paste, 
which must be rolled out as thin as a sheet of brown 
paper and cut into small rounds with a tin cutter. 
3ake them on a baking-sheet in a moderately hot 
oven. If you have good cream, you may use it for 
making the paste instead of the butter and milk : 
these biscuits (and indeed cakes and biscuits of all 
kinds) should always be kept in a tin box, or they 
soon become soft and unpalatable. 



184 OAKES AOT> BISCUITS. 

No. 331— BREAKFAST ROLLa 

Pat half a pint of milk into a small stewpan, with 
an omice and a half of fresh batter, and let it remain 
on the fire till lukewarm and the batter melted; 
beat ap one egg^ then add a dessert-spoonful of 
powdered sugar, and two table-spoonfuls of yeast, 
then add the milk and butter, and beat the whole 
well together five minutes. Have ready one pound 
of the best flour, add to the mixture, and let it stand 
before the fire half an hour, then knead it very gently, 
and form it into small rolls ; let them stand three-quar- 
ters of an hour, or till they are light, then bake them 
about a quarter of an hour, in not too quick an oven, 
and send to table quite hot. 

No. 338.— TORKSHIRB CAKES. 

Take two pounds of flour well dried, four ounces 
of fresh butter, three ounces of sugar, two eggs, a 
pint of milk, and two table-spoonfulls of yeast ; warm 
the milk with the butter to blood heat, beat the eggs, 
add the sugar and yeast, and raise the flour ; work 
the dough, and divide it into four round balls, which 
drop into the middle of four tins well buttered in- 
side ; let the balls rise for three-quarters of an hour, 
and bake nicely. A little more flour may be used in 
noLaking up the dough if necessary, and while hot cut 
the cake into four slices, butter them on each side, 



CAKES AlTD BISCUITS. 185 

and return it to the oven for a minute or two, and 
send to the breakfast table quite hot. The cakes 
that are not required at the time they are made, 
must be put into the oven to heat through the fol- 
lowing morning before they are cut up and buttered 
to send to table. 



186 PBESEBTTBS. 



PRESEEVES. 



No. 339.— GRATED ORANGE MARMALADE. 

Take double weight of loaf sugar to the weight 
of the Seville oranges ; grate off the outer rind of 
the oranges, halve them, and take out the pulp and 
juice with a tea-^poon, carefully keeping back the 
pips and the divisions between the pulp. Boil the 
skins in a large panful of water for two hours-; tie 
the grated rind in a piece of muslin, and boil with 
the skins ten minutes, then take it out of the water. 
Put a pint of the bitter water in which the skins 
have been boiled to every two pounds of sugar, add 
the pulp, juice, and the grated rind that you boiled 
with the skins, and boil all together forty minutes 
after it comes to the boil. When cold this marma- 
lade will be a clear amber jelly, not too bitter, hut 
deliciously flavored with Seville oranges ; it becomes 
a liltle firmer by keeping. Preserves are said to 
have come to the boil directly the whole surface of 
the jam is covered with small bubbles, not when it 
begins to bubble round the edge of the preserving- 
pan only. 



PBESEBVES. 187 

No. 340.--CHERRT PRESERVE. 

To each pound of fruit, after it is stoned, allow 
one pound of loaf sugar ; to every pound of sugar 
put half a pint of water, and dissolve to a syrup, 
then add the fruit, and let it boil as fast as possible 
for half an hour, till it just begins to jelly, as it soon 
thickens by keeping. Put it into pots, and when 
cold cover with brandy paper, and another cover 
outside this. 

No. 341.— PINE-APPLE JAM. 

Peel the pines quite thin, take out all the eyes, 
then cut them into thin slices, and these again into 
small dice, and to every two pounds of fruit add one 
pound and three-quarters of loaf sugar, and boil 
over a slow fire twenty-five minutes. 

No. 342.— PLUM JAM. 

Skin and stone the plums, then weigh equal quan- 
tities of fruit and sugar ; pound the sugar fine, and 
sprinkle it over the fruit in layers, in a deep dish or 
large basin, over night ; the next mommg boil the 
fruit and sugar for twenty minutes after it comes to 
the boil. 

No. 343.— BLACK CURRANT JAM. 

To each pound of the fruit stripped from the 
stalks allow half a pint of red currant juice and one 



188 PBESEBVES. 

pound and a half of loaf sugar ; boil all together for 
fifteen minutes after it comes to the boil, stirring it 
all the time. 

No. 344.— STRAWBERRY JAM. 

Pick the fruit from the stalks, and to every pound 
weight allow one pound of sugar ; pound the sugar, 
sprinkle it over the fruit in layers in a deep pan over 
night, and the next morning boil the fruit and sugar 
together for thirty-five minutes after it comes to the 
boil, stirring all the time. 

No. 346.— RASPBERRY JAM. 

Proceed in the same way as for strawberry jam, 
only boiling it for from fifteen to twenty minutes 
after it has come to the boil,* according to the quick- 
ness of the fire. 

No. 346.— RED CURRANT JELLY. 

Strip the currants from the stalks, and put them 
into a strong linen jelly-bag over night, with a plate 
in the mouth of the bag, on which you place as 
heavy a weight as the bag wiU bear, so that the 
pressure may force out the juice ; let it drip into a 
basin during the night, and the next morning meas- 
ure it, and to every pint of juice allow a pound of ^ 
loaf sugar. Boil the juice and sugar together, stir- 
ring it aU the time, and watching it carefully, to 



PEESEBVES. 189 

know the exact moment it comes to the boil, when 
you must let it boil for two minutes and a half only; 
if you allow it to boil longer it wUl never jelly. 

No. 34T.-.PLUM JELLY. 

Take three pounds of either common red plums or 
mussel plums, and boil them in three quarts of water 
till reduced to one quart ; strain through a bag, and 
to each pint of juice add a pound of sugar, and boil 
till it jellies ; then put into pots, and cover with 
paper when cold. 

No. 348.— CHERRY CHEESE. 

To twelve pounds of cherries, stoned, take three 
pounds of loaf sugar ; break the stones of part of 
the cherries and blanch the kernels, add them to the 
fruit and sugar, and boil all gently till the jam be 
comes quite clear ; pour into small and rather shallow 
pots, and keep in a dry place. 

No. 349.— BOTTLED FRUITS. 
Fill wide-necked bottles with any kind of fruits fit 
for tarts as close and full as possible, and in each 
bottle put over the fruit a quarter of a pound of pow- 
dered loaf sugar ; tie a piece of wet bladder tightly 
and closely over the mouth of each bottle, and place 
the bottles in a fish-kettle of water, with cloths under 
them and between them, and round the inside of the 



190 PEESEBVBS. 

kettle, BO as to prevent breakage, and let them boil 
by the side of the fire, or on it if not too fierce, till 
the fruit has sunk considerably in the bottles, and it 
looks sufficiently done ; then remove the fish-kettle 
from the fire, and let the bottles remain in the water 
till quite cold, when take them out, wipe them dry, 
and pnt them by in a cool, dry place. The bladders 
must be kept constantly moistened, while the bottles 
are on the fire, or they will burst ; and i^ notwith- 
standing this precaution, it should happen, the bottle 
must instantly be covered with a piece of fresh, wet 
bladder. The bladders are on no account to be re- 
moved at any time till the fruit is used. This receipt 
is best for all stone fruits, and the following one for 
gooseberries, currants, and raspberries. 

No. 350.— BOTTLED FRUITS. 

Pick the fruit from the stalks and put into wide- 
mouthed bottles ; then take one drachm of alum and 
put it into four gallons of boiling water, let it stand 
till cold, and then pour it into the bottles upon the 
fruit till they are filled, bung them tight, put them in 
a large fish-kettle of cold water, packed as in the pre- 
vious receipt, and heat it to one hundred and seventy- 
six degrees ; let them cool in the water, then tie them 
over with bladder and seal them, and put them by 
in a cool, dry place. The quantity of alum must on 
no account be exceeded, or the fruit will be hard. 



LIQUEUES. 191 



LIQUEURS. 



No. 351.— CURAQOA. 

Take the rinds of eight Seville oranges and eight 
lemons peeled very thin, and steep them three days 
in one gallon of best French brandy, adding a very 
little saffron to color it) ; strain, and put to it three 
pounds of loaf sugar, and, when quite dissolved, filter 
the liqueur quite clear, and bottle it. 

No. 352.— NOTEATJ. 

Take half a pound of bitter almonds, and the thinly 
pared rind of a fine lemon ; blanch the almonds, and 
shred the lemon-peel into small bits, put them to- 
gether in a mortar, and bruise them to as fine a 
powder as possible. Put the powder into a gallon 
stone bottle, and add a gallon of good spirits of wine 
and a quart of water ; cork the bottle particularly 
well, niake a point of shaking it once a day thor- 
oughly, and at the end of a week it will be ready for 
the syrup. Make a syrup of two pounds of lump 
sugar to a quart of water, let it stand till cold, and 
then pour it into the bottle, mix the whole well by 



192 IiIQUETTBS. 

shaking the bottle, and let it stand another week ; at 
the end of this time, strain the liquor from the aknond 
powder, and filter through white blotting paper. A 
conmion tin funnel will do for this purpose, putting 
a few slips of wood down the inside of the funnel ; 
and to make the filter, take a sheet of white blotting 
paper, square it, put comer to comer, and double it 
again ; the slips of wood prevent it clinging closely 
to the sides of the funnel, and in that way quicken 
the process. The noyeau is now ready for bottling, 
and it should be most carefully corked ; it should not 
be used for two months, but does not reach per- 
fection for a year, and goes on improving for many 
years. 

No. 353.— LIQUEUR DB QUATRE FRUITS. 

Take scarlet strawberries, raspberries, red cur- 
rants, and morella cherries, as they ripen in succes- 
sion. Extract the juice from them separately, and 
add to it a small proportion of white sugar-candy, 
so as to make it sweet and rich, but not a thick 
syrup, and strain it off as clear as possible. When 
you have the juices of the four fruits ready, mix 
them together, observing to put in a smaller quantity 
of currant and raspberry juice than of the cherry and 
strawberry, and to a pint of the juice add a gill of 
strong brandy, and then bottle it. The addition of 
some cherry and apricot kernels will be found a great 



LIQUEURS. 193 

improyement. The fruit ought to be picked in very- 
dry weather. 

No. 364.— CHERRY BRANDT. 

Fill as many wide-mouthed gooseberry-bottles as 
you require rather more than half full of fine ripe 
morella cherries, and to each bottle put twenty bitter 
almonds scraped^ not blanched, and five ounces of 
pounded white sugar-candy. Fill up the bottles with 
the best pale French brandy, .cork them well, resin 
the corks, and place the bottles in the wine-cellar. 
The brandy will be ready for use in the following 
winter, but is much improved by keeping another 
year or more. 

No. 355.— MILK PUNCH. 

Steep the thinly cut peels of twenty lemons and 
four Seville oranges in six quarts of fine brandy or 
rum for twenty-four hours, then add two quarts of 
lemon and orange juice (almost three-fourths orange 
juice), five quarts of water, four nutmegs grated, and 
two pounds and a half of loaf sugar ; when this has 
stood twenty-four hours, add seven pints of boiling 
milk, then let the whole stand about twelve hours ; 
after which run it through a jelly-bag till the liquor 
becomes quite clear and fit for bottling. Keep it in 
the wine-cellar and do not use it for some months. 
Age improves this excellent liqueur greatly. 

13 



104 LIQXnSXJRS. 

No. 356.— SHEUR 

To three quarts of red currant juice add three 
quarts of fine rum, and two pounds of best lump 
sugar. When the sugar is well dissolved, stir it all 
thoroughly together, and run it through a jelly-bag 
till perfectly bright ; then bottle it. 



PICKLES AND SAUOES. 196 



PICKLES AND SAUCES. 



No. 357.— INDIAN OHUTNEE. 

Takb a pound of sharp apples, pared and cored, 
half a ponnd of tomatoes, four ounces of muscatel 
raisins, four ounces of sultana raisins, four ounces of 
red chilies, four ounces of brown sugar, half a pound 
of brown sugar-candy, half a pound of salt, four 
ounces of bruised ginger, two ounces of garlic, two 
ounces of shaHots, a stick of horse-radish, and two or 
three sprigs of mint. Cut the apples in slices rather 
thicker than a penny piece, and these again into 
small squares ; stone the muscatel raisins, and chop 
them coarsely, and also the red chilies, garlic, shallots, 
and the sprigs of mint and the horse-radish, having 
previously scraped the latter; pound the sugar- 
candy, mix all the ingredients together, add a pint 
of lemon-juice or of the best vinegar, and let all 
simmer gently by the side of the fire till clear; 
if too dry, add more lemon-juice or vinegar; if too 
liquid, reduce more on the fire. The chutnee should 
be of a moist, syrupy consi^stency, without being 
liquid, and the chopped apples, muscatel raisrus. 



196 PICKLES AKD SAUCES. 

garlic, shallot, and whole Sultana raisins, should be 
tender, but not allowed to boil to a pulp. When 
cold, stir well, so that all the ingredients may be 
equally mixed, and put the chutnee into wide- 
mouthed pickle bottles ; cork them well, and cover 
the bungs with either bladder or resin, and keep 
them in a co&l place. 

No. 358— PICCALILLL 

This is to be made of all sorts of vegetables that 
can be pickled. Pull cauliflowers in bunches and slice 
cabbages, and put them on earthen dishes -or sieves 
sprinkled over with salt, and let them stand three 
days to dry. Onions, gherkins, sliced cucumber, 
radish-pods, capsicums, green tomatoes, or whatever 
can be pickled, put into salt and water one day, the 
next day dry tbeoi, and scald all iu brown vinegar, a 
few at a time, take them out as dry as you can, and 
when all are scalded, put away that vinegar. To one 
gallon of fresh brown vinegar add four ounces of 
ginger bruised, two ounces of whole white pepper, 
two ounces of allspice, two ounces of turmeric, four 
ounces of shallots, and boil slowly half an hour, then 
mix half a pound of the best flour of mustard with 
some boiling vinegar as you would with water for 
common use, and stir it into the vinegar and spices, 
but keep it from the fire, for it must not boil after 
the mustard is put to it. When the prepared vege- 



PICKLES AND SAUCES. 197 

tables are put into the jar (which should be a large 
one), strew in some brown mustard-seed amongst 
them, and put them in by degrees with the mixture 
of spices, stirring it up well when all are in the jar, 
that the spices and vegetables may be well mixed. 
The piccalilli will require looking to sometimes, and 
if it becomes too dry, add sufficient cold boiled vine- 
gar, and stir well in. If you cannot get all the vege- 
tables at the same time, you may keep on adding 
afterwards, taking care to prepare them in the same 
way by drying after they have been in salt and water, 
and then scalding them in boiling vinegar; but they 
must be cold when added to those in the jar, or they 
will not keep, and the whole must be occasionally 
stirred up, and the vegetables covered with the vine- 
gar mixture. Tie over the mouth of the jar with 
bladder to keep out the air. 

No. 359.— HOT GBEEN PICEXE. 

To two quarts of good vinegar add a quarter of a 
pound of salt, one ounce of ginger, two ounces of 
shallots, two large tea-spoonfuls of cayenne pepper, 
two ounces of mustard-seed, and one ounce of white 
pepper. Boil all these spices in the vinegar, and 
when cold put into a jar, with any green fruits or 
vegetables yoii choose, fresh as gathered. 



198 PIOKLES AND SAUCES. 

No. 360.— MOaUL SAUCE. 

Bake eighteen largensized tomatoes, and when done 
remove all the water and skin; the pulp only is to 
be used. Take eight omices of green apples pounded, 
eight ounces of salt, eight ounces of common raisins, 
stoned and pounded very fine, three ounces of 
ground ginger, two ounces of chilies pounded, half 
an ounce of garlic, and eight ounces of brown sn^ar, 
to which add a quart of the strongest brown vinegar. 
Care must be taken that all the ingredients are com- 
pletely bruised to a paste before the vinegar is added ; 
this done, bottle for use, and resin over the corks. 

No. 361.-.TUMS SAUCE. 

Take rather less than half an ounce of cayenne 
pepper, one ounce of pounded sugar-candy, six small 
shallots, six anchovies, six cloves (all these ingre- 
dients to be pounded), one quart of vinegar, one gill 
and a half of soy, and a gill and a half of mushroom 
catchup. Stir the whole together, and shake it up 
frequently ; in ten days it will be fit for use, then let 
it stand, and pour off the clear into small bottles ; 
the thick is good for hashes, etc. Cover the corks 
of the bottles with resin. 

No. 362.— TOMATO SAUCE. 

Break tomatoes into a preserving, pan, and draw 
them down till they are fit to pulp through a sieve, 



PICKLES AND SAtTCES. 199 

then rab them through a sieve, and boil them down 
till they are of the consistency of very thick cream ; 
add garlic and shallot while boiling, and before 
taking it off the fire some chilies, or cayenne pepper, 
and salt to taste. To half a sieve of tomatoes, two 
omices of shallots and one ounce of garlic is the right 
proportion. Bottle in wide-necked pickle bottles, 
and cover the corks with resin. Two table-spoonfuls 
of the above is sufficient to flavor the sauce of any 
dish. 

' No. 363.--WALNUT CATCHUP. 

Take walnuts when fit for pickling, pound them, 
and to every hundred of nuts add a small handful of 
salty put them into a pan, cover them over, and let 
them stand three or four days, stirring them once 
a day. Then press through a canvas bag (the easiest 
way is by sewing up three yards of canvas like a 
round towel, put the pulp into the folds, and pass a 
stick through each loop ; two persons in this manner 
will wring the walnuts much drier than by squeez- 
^g)) let the liquor settle, pour off the clear juice, and 
to each quart of it put half a pound of fine anchovies, 
and boil them with the juice till dissolved; strain 
the liquor so boiled, and to every quart put half a 
quarter of an ounce of mace, cloves, black pepper- 
corns, and ginger, ten cloves of shallot, and a gill 
of the best vinegar, and boil all again half an hour ; 



300 PICKLES ANB SAUCES. 

when cold bottle it for use, and put in each bottle 
ten cloves more of shallot, and a small quantity of 
the above spices: it improves by keeping. Resin 
the corks. 

No. 364.— MUSHROOM CATCHUP. 

To every peck of mushrooms put a handful of 
salt, break them up, let them lie all night, and then 
strain through a coarse cloth; to every quart of 
liquor put a quarter of an ounce each of clones, 
Jamaica pepper, black pepper, and ginger, two or 
three anchovies chopped, and a glass of port wine. 
Let all boil slowly together till half the liquor is 
wasted ; skim it well, and, when cold, bottle it, and 
resin the corks. 

No. 366.— OYSTER CATCHUP. 

Take one hundred large oysters (well cleaned, 
the eye and the gut should be carefully taken away), 
with all their liquor, one pound of fine anchovies, 
three pints of white wine, and one lemon, with half 
the peel cut very thin, and boU gently half an hour; 
then strain, and add a quarter of an ounce each of 
cloves and mace, and one nutmeg sliced, and boil a 
quarter of an hour, then add two ounces of shallots. 
When cold, bottle with the spices and shallots, and 
resin the corks. If the oysters are very large, they 
should be cut in two. 



PICKLES AND SAUCES, 201 



No. 366.— TARRAGON VINEGAR. 

Strip the leaves from a quantity of sprigs of tarra- 
gon, cut before the plants begin to bloom, and put 
six or eight large handfuls into a large-sized Notting. 
ham stone pickle jar, and pour a gallon of good 
vinegar upon the leaves. Cover over the mouth 
of the jar with a plate, and let it stand on the comer 
of the oven or boiler, the farthest from the fire, for 
three or four vreeks, then strain and filter it, and 
bottle for use. 

No. 367.— CHILI VINEGAR. 

Bruise one pound of large red ohilies, put them 
into a large pickle jar with a gallon of good vinegar, 
and proceed as in the above receipt 



903 HISOSLLAKSOUS BEOEIPTS. 



MISCELLANEOUS EECEIPTS. 



No. 368.— PICKLE FOR HAMa 

Taks one ounce of saltpetre, a quarter of a pound 
of bay salt, two pounds of common salt, half a pound 
of coarse sugar, a quart of strong ale, two ounces of 
black pepper, one ounce of allspice, and boil all to- 
gether ; pour it hot upon the hams, and turn them 
twice a day in the pickle for six weeks. Smoke them 
three we^ks, and then keep them in canvas bags till 
wanted for use. 

No. 369.— TO CURB A MILD HAM. 

To a ham of twenty-four pounds weight, take one 
pound of common salt, two ounces of bay salt, one 
ounce of saltpetre, and one pound of the coarsest 
brown sugar ; mix all well together, and rub the 
ham with the mixture. Rub well, and turn the ham 
twice a day for one week, and then hang it in wood 
smoke for a fortnight. 

No. 370.— TO KEEP FISH GOOD FOR SEVERAL DAYS. 

Put into a fish-kettle or large stewpan, spring 
water, vinegar, and salt, in the proportion of three 



MI80ELLANE0CS RECEIPTS. 203 

quarts of water to one pint of good yinegar, and a 
table-spoonful of salt ; place it on the fire, and when 
it hoils^ put in the fish, and let it remain only two 
minutes ; then drain, and let it hang up in a cool 
larder or cellar. Smelts and other small fish should 
only remain in the boiling liquid one minute, and be 
then drained, and hung up in wicker baskets, through 
which the air can easily pass. After being thus pre- 
pared the fish will remain good any reasonable time, 
and may be cooked in any way that may be desired. 

No. 371.— TO REMOVE TAINT FROM MEAT OR POULTRY. 

If meat, poultry, or game Ms become rather 
tainted in hot weather, the unpleasant flavor may be 
quite removed by washing the part affected with 
chloride of soda first, and then in fresh water only ; 
dry the meat well, and then cook it in any way that 
may be wished. 

No. 372.— TO KEEP MEAT, GAME, OR POULTRY IN HOT 

WEATHER. 

If there is any danger of meat being affected by 
hot weather, and you wish to keep it for a day or 
two longer, sprinkle it over with roughly pounded 
charcoal, and put the same under it; for birds, 
put a lump of charcoal in the inside, and sprinkle 
the pounded charcoal over the breasts and between 
the pinions of the body. 



204 MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. 

Ko. STS.—TO CLARIFY DRIPPING. " 

Have ready a large panM of boiling water, and 
into this pour the hot dripping, stir it thoroughly for 
a few minutes, and then leave it to get quite cold, 
when the clean dripping is easily removed from the 
top of the water, all the impurities sinking to the 
bottom. Dripping may be treated in this manner 
twice after using it for frying. 

No. 374.— BREAD CRUMBS FOR FRYING. 

Any pieces of crust may be dried in a cool oven, 
then pounded and put by in a bottle well corked for 
use. These bread' crumbs are always ready for fry- 
ing fish or cutlets on short notice, and they answer 
very well for all ordinary occasions ; but for a dinner 
party, use fresh bread crumbs. 

No. 3T5.—CELERY FLAVORING. 

At the time of year when celery is not in season 
you may obtain nearly as good flavor from celery 
seed, which you can buy at the seed shops. Tie a 
tea-spoonful in a piece of muslin, and boil in any stock 
or gravy where it may be required. 

No. 3T6.— AROMATIC HERB SEASONING. 

Take three ounces of basil, three ounces of mar- 
joram, two ounces of winter savory, three ounces of 
thyme, one ounce of dried bay-leaves, one ounce each 



MISCELLANEOUS EEOEIPTS. 205 

of mace and nutmegs, two omices of cloves, two 
ounces of peppercorns, half an omice of cayenne pep- 
per, half an ounce of grated lemon-peel, and two 
cloves of garlic. Dry all the herbs, strip the leaves 
fcom. the stalks, pound them in a mortar with the 
spices ; mix all well together, sift through a fine wire 
sieve, and put away in dry corked bottles for use. 

No. 377.— TO KEEP VEGETABLE-MARROW FOR WINTER 

USE. 

Gather the vegetable-marrows when they are very 
large and fully ripe, hang them up singly in string 
netting in a dry, cool, place, where they will have 
plenty of air, and they will keep good all the winter, 
and may be used as a vegetable, mashed like turnips, 
or they will make an excellent thick soup. 

No. 378.— SALAD SATJCE. 

Boil two eggs for ten minutes, then throw them 
into cold water, and, when quite cold, put the hard 
yolks into a basin and pound them quite smooth, 
then add to them the yolk of a raw eggj and mix 
well, and season with half a tea-spoonful of finely 
chopped onion (or less of shallot), a large tea-spoonful 
of salt, and half that quantity of pepper and of 
pounded sugar ; then add by slow degrees, a drop or 
two at a time, and stirring well all the while, oil and 
vinegar, in the proportion of six table-spoonfuls of 



206 MISCELLANEOUS REOEIPTS. 

good salad oil to two of vinegar ; working in the oil 
first, till the sauce becomes too thick, when thin it 
with vinegar, then add more oD, and again vinegar, 
till you have as mnch of the sauce as you require, 
and it is quite smooth and thick. In the summer 
time, stir into this sauce a dessert-spoonful of very 
finely chopped tarragon and chervil mixed, two- 
thirds of the quantity being tarragon; and in the 
winter, when the fresh herbs are not to be had, use 
tarragon vinegar and a little chili vinegar instead of 
the common kind. Taste the sauce, and if it needs 
more salt, pepper, or vinegar, add it, and should you 
l^e made more than you require to use, put what 
is left of the sauce by in a cold place, well covered 
from the air, and it will keep good for a day or two. 
The only art in making this sauce is to keep stirring 
it for a long time, and to add the oil veiy slowly, or 
you will curdle it. 

No. 379.— STRAWBERRY ACID FOR MAKING JELLY, Etc. 

Put twelve pounds of ripe strawberries into a pan, 
and pour over them two quarts of spring water, pre- 
viously acidulated with four ounces of tartaric acid, 
and let them remain twenty-four hours ; then strain 
them, taking care not to bruise the fruit. To each 
pint of clear liquor add a pound and a half of lump 
sugar finely powdered ; stir it frequently, and when 
dissolved bottle the syrup. The whole process must 



HISOELLANEOTTS BBOEIPTS. 207 

"be cold. Raspberry or currant acid is made in the 
same manner. The quantity fills twelve bottles, and 
for making jeUy, to a bottle of the syrup allow one 
ounce and a quarter of isinglass dissolved in as little 
water as possible ; strain it, and pour the syrup upon 
it by degrees, mix it well together, and then pour it 
into a jelly mould. This acid makes a very good 
sauce for boiled puddings by adding a sufficient 
quantity to give the flavor to either melted butter 
or water arrow-root, putting in also a few drops of 
cochineal, if the color of the sauce is not inviting ; 
and it also makes a very good summer drink, by 
stirring a little of it into iced water till thoroughly 
mixed. 

No. 380.— BROWNING FOR MADE DISHES. 

Take four ounces of loaf sugar, beat it small, put 
it into an iron frying-pan with one ounce of butter, 
and set it over a clear fire ; nux it well together all 
the time, and when it begins to be frothy and the 
sugar is dissolving, hold it higher over the fire till 
the sugar and butter is of a deep brown ; then pour 
in a little red wine, stir them well together, then 
add more wine, and keep stirring it all the while; 
put in the rind of a lemon, a little salt, three table- 
spoonfuls of mushroom catchup, two or three blades 
of mace, six cloves, four shallots peeled, and half an 
ounce of Jamaica pepper ; boil slowly fbt ten min- 



208 HISCELLAKEOTJS KEOEIFTS. 

ntes, pour it iato a lipped basin, having previonsl/ 
Btrained it, and when cold, skim it carefully and bottle 
for use. Resin the eorks and keep in a cool place. 

No. 381.— COCHINEAL COLORINa. 

Put a quart of spring water into a small preserv- 
ing-pan, with eight ounces of loaf sugar, and set it 
on the fire to boil, then add one ounce of cochineal 
and one ounce of salts of wormwood, both weU 
pounded in a mortar, and when this has boiled up, 
add two ounces of cream of tartar, and slir well 
together with a wooden spoon, and then put in one 
ounce of ponnded roche alum, stir well again till 
mixed, then strain through a jelly-bag. When cold, 
bottle the coloring in small bottles, cork them tight, 
and keep them in a cool place. 

No. 382.— MINCE-MEAT. 

Take five pounds of currants, three pounds of 
raisins, stoned and chopped, five pounds of very 
finely chopped suet, two pounds and a half of grated 
apples, two pounds and a half of sugar, the juice of 
five lemons, and five Seville oranges, one nutmeg 
and a half grated, and the weight of one in mace 
and in cloves very finely powdered, and a little more 
than one pound of shred citron and candied peels; 
moisten all with sweet wine and three glasses of 
brandy, mix all very thoroughly, put it into a jar 



HISOELLAKEOnS BEOEIPTS. 209 

^nd ooyer down closely. At each baking of pies use 
a little fres^ grated apple with the mince-meat. 

No. 383.— SAVORY JELLY. 

If you shonld want savory jelly in a hnrry, take 
a pint of good-flavored stock, or any clear soup you 
may happen to have, add to it a table-spoonful of 
tarragon vinegar and a glass of white wine, and 
warm them together in a stewpan over the fire. Put 
half an ounce of Nelson's gelatine to soak in a little 
cold water, and as soon as swelled, stir it in with the 
stock, etc., till melted, then clear the jelly with the 
white of one or two eggs, as you would calTs foot ; 
run through a jelly-bag till clear, pour it on a large 
dish about half an inch thick, put it on the ice or in 
a very cold place, and as soon as the jelly is well set 
and quite firm, cut it in dice, or chop it up for 
garnish as may be required* 



INDEX. 



SOUPS, Etc. 



No. 

OalTsTail 128 

Carrot , 116 

Chowder, or Cod^s Head.. . 109 

Clear 2 

Economical White Ill 

French 124 

Ghreen Pea 119 

Green Pea without Peas. . . 120 

Jenny Lindas 127 

Mock Turtle 126 

Oyster , 108 

Parsnip 117 



Pig's Head Mock Turtle. . . 

Potato 

Rabbit 

Scotch Fish and Soup 

Scotch Hare 

Scotch Hotch-potch 

Scotch Mutton Broth 

Soupe i la Bonne Femme. . 

Stock 

Turnip 

Yegetable-Marrow 

White 



Ho. 
125 
lU 
122 
110 
123 
121 
129 
113 
1 
115 
118 
11^ 



R]6CHAUFP]6S OF FISH. 



Cod flla Fran^aise 20 

Cod 4 la Oaronne 18 

Cod i la ProTcngale 13 

Cod, Bonne Bouche of ... . 14 

Cod, Boulettes of 19 

Cod, Croquettes of 15 

Cod, Curried 12 

Cod Fritters 17 

Cod, Vol-au-Vent of 16 

Fish and Eggs 5 

Fish and Macaroni 7 

Fishcakes... 6 

Fish la White Smioe a 



Fish Pudding 8 

Fish Salad. 23 

Fish, to dress a second 

time 4 

Kedgeree 25 

Mackerel, Soused. 24 

Salmon and Salad 22 

Sabnon Cutlets 21 

Turbot k la Cr^me 10 

Turbot i la Sainte Mene- 

hould 11 

Turbot Cutlets 9 



212 



INDEX. 



DRESSED FISH. 



No. 

Crah, Hot 138 

Lobster & la Murphy 136 

Lobster CiiUets 13*7 

Mackerel i la Ravigote.. . . 133 

Mackerel, filleted 132 

Oyster PiUau 139 

Oyster Sausages MO 

Oysters, Fried 142 

RifiCHAUFFfiS 

Bechamel of. 26 

Blanquette of 34 

Broiled Shoulder of 21 

Broiled, with Tomato Sauce 28 

Croquettes of. 45 

Curried 37 

Cutlets i la Parmesane 31 

Cutlets & la Sainte Mene- 

hould 29 

Grilled Cutlets 33 

Grosvenor Cutlets 30 



No. 

Oysters, Larded 141 

Oysters, Sorento 144 

Oysters, Stewed. 143 

Salmon with Piccalilli 

Sauce 134 

Smelts i la Russe 135 

Soles aia Colbert 131 

Soles, Filleted, with Oysters 130 

OF MXTTTOK 

Hashed, with Mushrooms. . 36 

Minced, with Cucumber. . . 41 

Minced, with Poached Eggs 40 

Prussian Cutlets 32 

Pudding of 38 

Rissoles of 44 

Stewed i la Jardiniere. ... 43 

The Epicure's Hash 36 

Timbals of 39 

Vegetable-Marrow Stuffed 

with 48 



R£CHAUFF£S of BEEF. 



Croquettes in Potato Paste 47 

Fried with Onions 50 

Gallimaufry 56 

Hafhed 48 

Minoed au Gratin 49 

Mouldof ^6 



Pcdpetti 64 

Potted 55 

Scalloped 51 

Stewed 4 la Poulette. 52 

Stewed en Matelote 53 



R6CHAUFF£S of VEAL. 



1 ritalienne 57 

Blanquette of. 62 



CalTs Head i la Poulette. . 63 
CalTs Head Frittersw 64 



INDEX. 



218 



Calves' Feet Fritters 67 

Fritters of, with Tomato 

Sauce 61 

Glazed Cutlets, with Sorrel 60 



No. 

Hashed Calf s Head 65 

Larded Cutlets of. 69 

Mould of CalTs Head 66 

Yeal and Bioe Pie 68 



RfiCHAUFFlfiS OF PORK. 



Broiled, & la Milanaise 71 

Broiled, with Mog^ Sauce . 10 

Curried 73 

4 

R:6CHAUFF:fiS 
Fowls. 

Blanquette of 74 

Capilotade of 78 

Cromesquis of 80 

Croquettes of 79 

Hashed 75 

Quenelles of 85 

Chickens. 

Fried 76 

Kajonnaise 86 

Minced 77 

Pudding, i la Reine 83 



Minced 68 

Minced, with Onions 69 

Rissoles of 72 

OP POULTRY. 

Rissoles of. 84 

Scalloped 81 

Vol-au-Vent of 82 

Turkey. 

Capilotade of 89 

Grilled Legs of 87 

Quenelles of 88 

Salad of 90 

Rabbit. 

Fritters of 93 

G4teau of. 91 

Hashed *. 92 



r£chauff£s of game. 



'V'bnisok. 

Hashed 94 

Minced 92 

Puffs of 97 

Sausages of 96 

PABTBmaBS. 

Saladof 102 



Sahnisof 100 

Salmis of Cold 101 

Pheasant. 

Hashed 103 

Quenelles of 105 

Salad of 104 



314 



INDEX. 



Oame Patties. , , 
(Hteau of Hare. 



98 
99 



Na 

Grouse Salad 107 

Salmis of Woodcocks . . . . 106 



SAVORY DISHEa 



MtrrroN. 

BndsedLegc^ 145 

Cabobof. 148 

Haunch of, to taste like 

Roebuck 146 

Loin of, Yenisonized 147 

Saut^sof 149 



Beef and Macaroni d, Tlta- 

lienne 153 

BouilU 150 

Boulettes of 154 

Cured Brisket of, for Christ- 
mas 151 

Cured to eat Cold 152 

YSAL. 

Knuckle of, with Barley . . 155 
Neck of. Cutlets 156 

Curry, Bengal 159 

Curry, Madras Dry 160 



Curry, to boil Rice for ... . 161 

Grouse, i la Russe 177 

Hashed Calf s Head 165 

Indian Fowl Pillau 158 

Indian Puff^ 162 

Jugged Hare 163 

Kidneys 4 la Frangaise. . . . 164 

Roman Pudding 169 

Scotch Collops 168 

Scotch Eggs 167 

Turkish Pilaflf 157 

Westphalia Loaves. /..... 166 

Pies. 

Colonel Courtenay*s 176 

English Pat^ de Pole Graa 174 

Grouse 170 

Hare 172 

Partridge 171 

Sausage 175 

Standing, for Breakfast ... 173 



DRESSED YEGETABLES. 



Broccoli Sprouts k Pltalienne 185 

Cabbage, Red, Stewed 184 

Carrots, with Parsley 189 

CauHflower, with Parmesan 

Cheese 106 

Endive, Stewed 179 

PrenchBeana,ilaPran9aise 178 



Parsnips, Mashed 188 

Peas, Stewed 182 

Peas, Stewed, without Ham 

or Bacon 183 

Potato Chips 196 

Potatoes tlla Crdme 195 

Potatoes a la Maitre d*H6tel 194 



nn>x!z. 



216 



Potatoes & la Ruase 19*7 

Potatoes, New, au Beurre. 193 
Potatoes, Old, how to boil. 192 
Salsify or Scorzonera in 
Batter 191 



Ko. 
Salsify or Scorzonera in 

Brown Sauce •'. . 190 

Spinach, Stewed 180 

Spinach stewed with cream. 181 
Vegetable-Marrow, Mashed 188 



SALADa 



Beet-root 198 

Cauliflower 201 

Haricot Bean 200 



Potato 202 

Tomato 199 



SAVORY REMOVES. 



Buttered Eggs 209 

Cheese Omelet 207 

FoiKiue 204 

Prench Stewed Cheese. . . . 208 

German Cheese 206 

Ham or Tongue Toast .... 210 



Lobster Salad 214 

Macaroni 211 

Macaroni i Tltalienne .... 212 

Macaroni with Tomato. ... 213 

Parmesan Balls 205 

Scotch Woodcock 203 



SAUCES. 



Bread 215 

Brown Onion 222 

Cream, for Fish 220 

Dutch, for Pish 219 



Horse-radish 216 

Lobster 218 

Oyster 211 

White 221 



PUDDINGS. 



Amber 226 

Apple Charlotte 268 

Apricot 259 

Baden 266 

Bakewell 234 

Berkeley 238 

Bread and Butter Marma- 
lade 211 

Bread, Boiled 232 



Bread, Brown, German . . . 265 

Buckinghamshire 256 

Cabinet, Cold 231 

Cabinet, Grerman, with 

" Quicken" Sauce 267 

Canadian 228 

Castle 258 

Citron 260 

College, Baked 253 



216 



INDEX. 



No. 

OusUrd, St Leooftrd's 224 

Deyti«% 236 

ExhibittoQ 243 

Fig 269 

Friar's Omelet 278 

Fritters, Orange 275 

Fritters, Potato 274 

German 263 

Hanover 225 

Houiton Sponge 241 

KhaU Khan's 242 

Lemon ;i50 

Lemon i54 

Lemon, Baked 262 

Madeira 229 

Orange 249 

Pancakes, Keithoch 273 

Peas 250 

Potato 234 

i 

Princess Amelia's 240 , 



SWEET 

Apple Whip 289 

Blanc-mange 282 

Blanc-mange, Arrow-root. . 285 
Blanc-mange, Ground Bice 284 
Blanc-mange, Iceland Moss 286 
Blanc-mange, Whole Bice. 283 

CalTs Foot Jelly 281 

Cheesecakes, Gocoanut. ... 301 

Cheesecakes, Lemon 300 

Cheesecakes, Bice 302 

Cream, German 293 

Cream, German Bum 295 

Cream, Mille Fruit 293 

Custards 298 



No. 

Plum, Christmas , 251 

Plum, Bich 252 

Bavensworth 223 

Bice, Boiled 255 

Bice, French 245 

Bice, Grerman 264 

Boyal 227 

Scarborough 235 

SeviUe 276 

Sir Watkin Wynn's 244 

Souffle 247 

Souffle, Almond 272 

Souffle, Apple and Bice. . . 270 

Sonffl^ Arrow-root 271 

Souffle, Strawberry. 248 

Treacle 230 

Twenty Minutes' 233 

Victoria 261 

Wollaton 246 

Yorkshire 239 

DISHES. 

Custards, Orange 299 

Custard, Standing 297 

Fool, Currant 304 

Fool, Gooseberry 303 

French Plums, Stewed. . . . 305 
Fruit Salad, or Macedoine. 306 

Gateau de Naples 296 

Ginger Apples. . . . .( 290 

Italian Sponge 291 

Kesale, Bussian 292 

Lemon Souffle 279 

Orange Jelly 280 

Bed Bobbin 287 

SUpCurd 28* 



nnoEZ. 



217 



PASTBT. 
No. 



Almond Paste for Tartlets. 314 

Crust for Raised Pies 310 

French Pastrj 313 

Grenoa Pastry 312 



No. 



Italian Pastry .*. . 311 

Puff Paste 30*1 

Short Crust 308 

Suet Crust for Meat Pies.. 309 



CAKES AND BISCUITS. 



Almond 320 

Apple Cakes 334 

Arrow-root 328 

Breakfast Bolls 33*7 

Chocolate Cakes 333 

Cinnamon 321 

Coooanut Cakes 332 

Devon Currant 317 

Gingerbread Cakes 325 

Gingerbread, Dundee 323 

Gingerbread, Plain 324 

Gooseberry Cakes 336 



Lemon Cakes 329 

Orange Biscuits 330 

Plum, Rich 318 

Plum, Soda 319 

Pound 316 

Rock Cakes 326 

Scotch Biscuit 336 

Scotch Seed-time 322 

Siirewsbury Cakes 32t 

Sponge 316 

Whip Biscuits 331 

Yorkshire Cakes 338 



PRESERVES. 



Bottled Fruits 349 

Bottled Fruits 360 

Cherry Cheese 348 

Cherry Preserve, Kentish . 340 

Currant Jam, Black 343 

Currant Jelly, Bed 346 



Orange Marmalade, Grated 339 

Pine Apple Jam 341 

Plum Jam 342 

PlumJelly 347 

Raspberry Jam 346 

Strawberry Jam 344 



LIQUEURS. 



Cherry Brandy 364 

Cura^oa 351 

Milk Punch 366 



Noyeau 362 

Qu&tre Fruits 353 

Shrub 356 



FI0ELE3 ANB SAUOBS. 



Chili Vinegar 361 

Hot Qreen Pli^b 359 

Indiuk Ohutnee SGI 

ilogai Smuoe 360 

UuBhroom Sauoe 364 

OytUr Cab^ap 366 



Ha 

PNaOiUl 368 

Tsrr^OD Vinegar 366 

Tomato Sauoe 36S 

Turns Sauce 361 

Walnut Catchup 3S3 



inSCBIXANEOnS REGECTa. 



Xromatia Herb Seascaiing. 3T6 
Bread Grumba for frTing . . 314 
Brownii^ for Made DiaheH 380 

Celery Flavoring 315 

Cochineal Coloring 381 

Mince Ueat 382 

Pkkle for Hams 368 

Salad Sauce 318 

Savory Jell; 383 

Strawberrj Add for m^dng 

Jelly 319 



To Clarify Drippng 313 

To Cure a ISM Ham 369 

To keep Fish good for 

several days 310 

To keep Ueat, Game, <x 

Poultry, in hot weather. 312 
To keep Tegetable-Marrow 

for Winter uae 311 

To i«inove taint bont Ueat 

ofPoultiT 311 



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